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Which is better for C++? MS VC++, Borland C++ Builder, Others.

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Hello. I'm a little confused about which is better to use. The game development industry seems to prefer Microsoft Visual C++. Why? But, I want to know how C++ Builder compares to the other, and the pros and cons of each (speed-wise or others). I'm going to use OpenGL as the 3D graphics API. Do you know of big-time games (such as Quake, Halo, Counter-Strike, Warcraft, Starcraft, etc.) made with Borland C++ Builder? There is also a Borland C++ BuilderX w/c is free. Also, I think coding in MS VC++ using MFC is really dirty. C++ Builder (and Delphi) abstracts the underlying MFC with its own framework--VCL--which is very well designed and easy to use and extend. Comments anyone? Currently, I use Delphi 5 for my 3D games. I am really doing great at it. I have made my own game engine and 3D 3rd-person multiplayer shooting game for a school project. [edited by - cbjurado on February 21, 2004 9:07:46 PM]

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With C++ BuilderX you can actually use microsoft''s visual C++ compiler MFC, Win32, .Net, etc. (so long as you have it already installed) as well as Borland''s and the GNU compiler. However I think their free version is only able to use the gnu and borland compiler, you may be able to set up the VC++ compiler manually but I have not looked into that. Another good IDE is Eclipse it is free, pretty professional, has everything you could want in an IDE and you can get a plugin called CDT that allows you to write C,C++ it is mainly used in Java development but is worth a look though.

If you do a quick search for information relating to the performance of each compiler you will probably find that microsoft''s compiler is the best, but is for windows only.

I find for game development you probably won''t need to worry to much about api''s such as MFC / Win32 as they are more designed for applications that use standard gui elements. You will probably just create a window and then use OGl, STL or wrappers like SDL, etc at most.

As for what games are created with I don''t know.

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They perfer MSVC++ because Microsoft basically controls all of the majority of the computer industry.

Therefore there compiler obviously will most likely work in the future as well, due to the fact Microsofts operating system is currently the most popular.

Plus most games are not coded in MFC, only applications and not as frequent as one may belive, that what the resource section in an exe is for.

Also, Miscrosoft Visual C++ will most likely not fail, since Microsoft is such a big coperation.

However I find it can be useful at times to use multiple compilers, such as intels c++ compiler.

You can make good use of dll files used for your mathmatical related stuff, or other related things that have a large tick counts.

This will help the performance, of games since intels compiler is built around the idea of optimization and stuff.

Which is always a good thing to consider. Then you can use DLL's that are super optimized that way you don't end up with lotsa lag, but it really depends on what your doing, lotsa dlls can probably cause lag if you don't use them correctly >.<

[edited by - DevLiquidKnight on February 21, 2004 9:46:04 PM]

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I don''t like MFC either. It''s ugly.

VC.NET is a package of a) a C++ compiler b) an IDE c) a collection of libraries like MFC.
What is important to you? The programming libraries are usually not well suited for game-programming and proprietary.

VC.NET has a nice C++-compiler, it''s very standard compliant and generates fast code.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
if you are OK with delphi, why don''t you just use delphi?
c++ builder is OK, but you''ll find some trouble with some libraries as DirectX and SDL, but all those problems have a solution (or more ;P). is as fast as any other C++ compiler (in the resulting exe) but compilation times are a little slow... i don''t think there is a BIG game made with c++ builder (i''m wrong, for sure, but i don''t know it all...), but i know a few made with delphi. C++ builderX is a little crappy and they don''t provide support for it (in the free version). quake, also, is not programmed in Visual C++, i believe they used the Watcom compiler, as they used DJGPP for wolfestein/doom (i think), so, you see, is not the compiler, is the genius behind it...
if you don''t want to spend money, you could use dev-c++, is more or less like visual c++ 6 (not .net), there are packages for SDL/Directx/etc for it. you can do anything (or almost) with it. and it''s free.
if you are planing to join ''the industry'', you may prefer to use (buy) some version of VC++ .net. else, you can use any compiler/ide you want, it''s all a matter of taste.
finally, i advice to keep going with delphi, if you like it and find it easy/useful. but, knowledge doesn''t hurts, so it''s good to know some other languages (C/C++/python/etc) and ide''s. just in case...

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I just answered this question on flipcode (so did a lot of other people). I guess you''re the same person?

Avoid BCBX! The IDE is bollocks. MAJOR bollocks.

sam

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Yeah C++ Builder 5 and 6 were (are) excellent products. They tend to be more standards-compliant than most others which is a good thing. Plus you have the VCL to use, which is arguably the best Windows RAD programming tool ever. This allows you to write Windows GUI games very easily, and to share large chunks of code between your tools and your game engines, since you don''t have to resort to VB or something to make the tools. Furthermore the VCL goes far beyond the visual components. Many can be used in the actual game engine, and help a lot! Everything from MD5 encrypting/decrypting, to web-server integeration, to easy threading, etc. Not to mention CodeGuard... the single best way to eliminate memory leaks, invalid accesses etc. from your code in the Debug phase! Just tons of goodness.

That said, I don''t know what the hell they were thinking with C++ BuilderX. I''ve never used the full version, but the free one loses the whole VCL and stumbles back to a SLOW compiler with a sub-standard interface. About the only thing it has going for it is the cross-platform/compiler stuff.

The major drawback is money. BCB6 costs a ton more than VC++, because quite frankly, it has a lot more stuff. If you feel like using .NET, you can even do that in BCB. MFC? Sure. If you feel like shooting yourself in the foot with straight Windows API, you can even do that. Basically anything that compiles and runs under VC++ can be made to work without too much trouble under Borland. There are the odd annoyances, but overall it''s a pleasant experience.

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Hm, actually the BCBX compiler is the same version as the BCB6 compiler. Actually, it''s apparently slightly newer. BCBX is 5.6.4 whereas BCB6 is 5.6

I always found the BCB (not X) ide somewhat buggy. And when you compile VCL projects it always seems to drag in about a billion source files and takes *forever* to compile! Apart from that though the whole BCB RAD thing really is quite fabulous. The forms designer along with the properties dialog are the two most useful things ever! The ability to just click and you''ve automagically got an event handler.. brilliant!

sam

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quote:
Original post by AndyTX
Yeah C++ Builder 5 and 6 were (are) excellent products. They tend to be more standards-compliant than most others which is a good thing.

You''re calling VC++ 6 standards-compliant??

Don''t get me wrong, I used to use it (now use .NET), and it was a very decent IDE/compiler, but it''s hardly standards compliant. It can''t even handle scoping in for statements properly.

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He said "C++ Builder 5 and 6" not VC++ 6... unless you meant VC++6? I''ve heard that VC++6 wasn''t particularly standards compliant, but it never held me up before.

sam


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