Jump to content
  • Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

bob123452

compilers

This topic is 5256 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

how different are all of the c++ compiler''s? Does anyone know what compiler the c++ how to program by deitel book uses? Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Compilers are differnt, syntax tends to remain the same from compiler to compiler. However sometimes some compilers are a bit differn''t im not to sure about the book your talking about though so maybe someone else may know more info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For the programs from Deitel & Deitel, any old C++ compiler will work just fine.


"Sneftel is correct, if rather vulgar." --Flarelocke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"That damn bug book," is what my friends call it.

With C++ compilers are judged on how closely they follow the C++ standard, a gargantuan document outlining the language.

If anything, get yourself a recent compiler and avoid Visual C++ 6.0 like the plague.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
well i''ve heard that microsoft visual basic is a kind of standard so i wanted to know how to write syntax for the compiler. what do you guys think the best compiler is?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
erm, I hope you didn''t mean MS Visual Basic... that isn''t C++!

Basically:
GCC (GNU Compiler Collection) - this is free and fairly standards complient - you can get a windows version of this called MinGW, I''d suggest downloading DevC++ which has mingw included with it

Microsoft Visual C++ (part of MS Visual Studio) - as antareus said version 6 is worth missing, the latest version .NET are pretty good on standards complience - also MSVS is used frequently by professional windows developers (in its various versions)

Borland C++ (version 5 I think) - Borland have released this for free - I don''t know too much about it.

Other options, if you''re only interested in C programming I''d suggest lcc (google LCC-WIN32 for windows).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yes i did mean microsoft visual c++ .net 2003. how hard would it be to change form writing in syntax for the gcc compiler for a while and then switching to visual c++.net 2003?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Almost all C++ programs that compile on MSVC++ will compile on GCC without any changes. A textbook should not contain any compiler-specific code; I would think it likely that every example will compile on MSVC++ and GCC.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All of the CURRENT C++ compilers are very compliant to the standard on every aspect which a learning programmer is likely to write ... there are abolutely no differences in their treatement of basic types, classes, functions, code orgranization, namespaces, etc ...

As you get into advanced C++ coding, very advanced, then each compiler''s quirks begin to show up .. but only rarely even so, and usually in a way that is easy to identify and work around. The complete C++ lanaguge standard is a fairly complicated thing, and in fact there are even a few areas of it whose interpretation are still being discussed ... so when you download libraries like boost (www.boost.org) which is a very advanced library meant to give programmers very many helpfull tools to use, there are some noticable differences ... but don''t worry about them for now, as long as you have ANY recent compiler ...

I personally know of GCC 3.1 or later, Microsoft Visual C++ 7.1 or later (Visual C++ 2003), Borland C++ 5.5 or later (the free compiler, and Borland C++ Builder 6, and Borland C++ Builder X).

I personally don''t now 100% the relationship between Dev-C++, Bloodshed C++, MinGW, and GCC ... but anyone who does now what they are exactly and how good their standard compliance is, should please post it here.

I have not used it at all, but I too have heard Comeau is supposed to be a good standard compliant compiler. In fact supposedly that is the primary goal of the creators (to be the most compliant compiler).

I used to use Visual C++ 6.0 for over 2 years, back when DirectX 6 was the big thing, and I can tell you personally, it SUCKED completely for any sort of template writing or new standard library stuff. Back them I used to compile programs with Visual C++ until they broke, then I''d run Borland C++ Builder 5 to get usefull "correct" error messages, fix the compliance issue, or sometimes even have to break my code to get VC6 to compile it. Now I use Visual Studio 2003 at work, and am very happy with it for writing good general C++ as well as windows programs of course - but I''m still a Borland fan myself, and highly recommend you check out the free version of Borland C++ Builder X.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!