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asha101

workload difference between low polygon model and high polygon model

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Hi, can anyone tell me the workload difference bewteen low polygon model and high polygon model? I have hired an artist, he''s charging me the same rate for a low polygon model and a high polygon model. I am wondering if that is fair. I want to create some monster model, some with high details for animation, some for realtime. I feel that the realtime model should take a lot less work, but I am a programmer and know nothing about art. I''d appreciate it if someone can tell me the likely ratio between the two type of work?

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That''s a very ignorant view of modeling difficulty. Number of polygons does in no way, correlate to the time required to design a model. Unless of course you''re considering the difference between a wooden crate and a "monster" model.

In many aspects, high poly modeling is easier than low poly, especially in the case of animation. An example of this, is that with a high polygon model allows the artist to pile vertices up around joints in order to make joints rotate with less visually displeasing deformation. It takes a more experienced and talented modeler to achieve a nice asthetic with low poly animated models in this case.

As for a ratio, there isn''t one. It''s art, and artists are incredibly underappreciated (and underpaid for what they do).


Klowner
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http://dugnet.com/klown

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The difficulty lies in making the good low-poly model. After that, all you have to do is press a single "Smooth" button in your modeling program, and bam! ... high-poly deliciousness.

(assuming he''s using a high-end modeling program)

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I always make my model very have poly and then when i am done I use a very good tool the comes with my program, Lightwave 3d, which is qemLOSS2, which i can take a 200,000 poly model and what it does it you enter a numberof polys you want and it will do it best to keep current shape a form and lower it to the number. Its work very well when the number it at least 1000 pols or higher.

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quote:
Original post by asha101
Hi, can anyone tell me the workload difference bewteen low polygon model and high polygon model? I have hired an artist, he''s charging me the same rate for a low polygon model and a high polygon model. I am wondering if that is fair. I want to create some monster model, some with high details for animation, some for realtime. I feel that the realtime model should take a lot less work, but I am a programmer and know nothing about art. I''d appreciate it if someone can tell me the likely ratio between the two type of work?


What everyone above has said is so true. Low poly modeling takes much more time and skill that high poly.

The fact that you are getting the same price for each type of model is good for you. Would it make you feel better if he/she charged you more for the low poly versions?

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Veovis is dead right. A high poly is just a smoothed version of a low poly. It would take forever otherwise. Ask your artist why you''re paying him for two models when all he''s going to make is one.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by MessageBox
Veovis is dead right. A high poly is just a smoothed version of a low poly. It would take forever otherwise. Ask your artist why you''re paying him for two models when all he''s going to make is one.


Low poly is smoothed, but to optimize it for gaming (triangles) requires additional work, hence two prices.

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Very little extra work. Just press "Triangulate" and maybe make some very minor adjustments. Not enough to justify two prices.

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quote:
Original post by MessageBox
Very little extra work. Just press "Triangulate" and maybe make some very minor adjustments. Not enough to justify two prices.


You never know what tool set the aritist is using. All programs do not triangulate equally. It then might take considerable adjustment especially where animation is concerned.

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