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Prince Of Persia 1 design not POP3D??

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hello i am the same person who asked abt the design of Prince Of Persia couple of days ago, i am interested in making the original POP1 for mobiles not POP3D, i asked abt the sort of 3D view of POP which gave the impression that if i want to develop POP3D using MIDP2, no, thats not the case, what i m intersted in is that POP1 has a inclined view not like other 2D games which have straight 2D view, so how i can do this, and also the collision detection, screen scrolling , how can i do these things Hope its now clear that i m asking abt POP1 which was developed more than a decade ago bye

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If I remember well, the screens of the original Prince of Persia were basically an 2D array of tiles (block, ground, ground that will fall, trap...). Only the graphics were in (some kind of) 3D. I think that is isometric oblique perspective, but I really don''t know.
You can do all the collision detection and similar stuff like in a Mario Brothers (or other 2D side-scroller) clone. Then, for graphics, translate the things you need to draw further (the background, the torchs, etc...) or closer (the columns, some little rocks, etc...) from their position in the screen along the diagonal you''re using as Z-axis.
Anyway, the thinks you''re asking will have more solutions in the "Game programming" or "Tilebased and Isometric" forums than here, in "Game design".

theNestruo

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POP always bugged me because it was tough to line up jumps and such. Take a look at Flashback: The Quest for Identity. It uses the grid system in a more rigorous way, and it makes things like big jumps and awkward traps a little bit more intuitive. I don''t think that a crossover of Flashback''s controls and POP''s content would cause trouble, except maybe with swordfighting (Falshback used guns), but even that would be simple. Easier coding, easier playing.

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Prince of Persia is a tile-based, page-scrolling action/puzzle game.

Tile-based
Each screen is composed of a grid of rectangular cells or tiles. There were roughly 20 tiles across the screen and 4 tiles vertically, with the ability to see an upper and lower level passage through the dungeon. The Prince could only occupy one tile at a time, though the smooth running animation cleverly hid that (he always stopped smack in the middle of a tile - including when the spikes got him).

Page-Scrolling
When the Prince exited the screen in either direction, an entirely new screen was presented with the Prince entering from the opposite side (exit left, enter right, and vice versa). There were never traps on the very first tile the Prince would encounter, as that would have been an unfair disadvantage.

Action/Puzzle
The majority of the game consisted of navigating the maze-like dungeon (simple in the early stages, then progressively harder), but the Prince also came across guards and other characters whom he had to fight with a sword picked up in level 1 (you can''t exit the level without the sword, which neatly avoids backtracking). The villains include skinny and fat guards, skeletons, a mirror image of the Prince and the evil Grand Vizier Jaffar himself.

The Prince
The Prince had three heart icons to begin with, indicating how much damage he could sustain. For every drop from too high, every cut with a sword and other non-fatal injury, a heart was deducted. These could be restored with red potions, and could be increased with purple potions to a maximum of, I believe, six.

Fatal drops existed (fall more than one screen height - splat!), as well as spikes that came out of the floor. The Prince ran most of the time, but by holding down the Shift key he would take single, deliberate steps forward (got you through spikes as well as lined you up with a ledge).

The Prince could run, jump and climb up, climb down, perform a running jump, and thrust and parry when swordfighting. When an enemy was encountered, pressing the Shift key drew (and sheathed!) the sword, Up parried a blow, Space thrust the sword and Left and Right cause the Prince to advance and retreat (in classical sparring pose, natch!)

Conclusion
That''s a fairly concise description of the design of Prince of Persia. Note the elegant and efficient control scheme.

Prince of Persia 2 was much more visually interesting, and included quite a few visceral additions: more frenetic action, more varied attacks (one character throws his sword in the first level, when you have none; duck to have it kill a guard approaching from your rear), higher skill requirements (the end of the first level has you run and jump off a pier onto a sailing ship) and more interesting puzzles (took me a while to figure out how to get pas the sandpit at the start of the dungeon). When you''re done implementing PoP 1, consider trying your hand at 2.

quote:
Original post by Iron Chef Carnage
POP always bugged me because it was tough to line up jumps and such.
The Shift key, my friend. Moves you to the edge, lines you up perfectly.

quote:
Take a look at Flashback: The Quest for Identity. It uses the grid system in a more rigorous way, and it makes things like big jumps and awkward traps a little bit more intuitive. I don''t think that a crossover of Flashback''s controls and POP''s content would cause trouble, except maybe with swordfighting (Flashback used guns), but even that would be simple. Easier coding, easier playing.
Nah. Flashback was an okay game, but it''s no Prince of Persia. It''s claim to fame is the interesting story and its use of rotoscoping for character animation.

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
The Shift key, my friend. Moves you to the edge, lines you up perfectly.


Provided you aren''t needing to do a running jump, which launched about 2 tiles after you pressed jump (IIRC)

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Oluseyi:
quote:
(...) he had to fight with a sword picked up in level 1 (you can''t exit the level without the sword, which neatly avoids backtracking).


Allow me to disagree, I can skip level 1 without geting the sword

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Yes, you can complete PoP1 in under 20 minutes if you know what you''re doing and practice a good deal.

http://www.phys.uu.nl/~dijkema/prince/

Never was patient enough to get past level 8 though.

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POP was one of those games where you had to learn almost every move by heart.
I dont remember the level number, but I clearly remember this one where any jump you make involves falling several stories to your death if you failed.
Running jumps were a bitch because of the way the animations were captured.

The key was timing. And knowing how to hold onto ledges, too

The only reason I kept going was the sheer joy of the fighting system. Oh, how I loved the feint/parry/lunge. Probably the most satisfying fencing system I have used TO THIS DAY !


Sancte Isidore ora pro nobis !

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to reiterate... it''s already been done. near perfect conversion. I''ve got it on my phone

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Flashback really should not be compared to POP. POP got kind of repetative, while Flashback really got you involved in the story and environment. Meanwhile POP was more action intense, and Flashback was just cool as hell.

By the way, the main POP guy was rotoscoped which is what gives him that eary realistic animation.



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Hrm, little off topic here, but could someone point me in the direction of a good article or tutorial on rotoscoping. I''ve tried searching, but all I''ve been able to find is definitions and stuff about the old animation technique (as in the non-computer technique).

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quote:
Original post by Kazgoroth
Hrm, little off topic here, but could someone point me in the direction of a good article or tutorial on rotoscoping.
LOL!
quote:
Rotoscope:
1. In computer graphics, to rotoscope is to create an animated matte indicating the shape of an object or actor at each frame of a sequence, as would be used to composite a CGI element into the background of a live-action shot.
Obviously, you hardly need an article or tutorial to capture live action and draw over it!

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Ah yes, you appear to be quoting the second result of my google search (the first was a website for a band).

quote:
Obviously, you hardly need an article or tutorial to capture live action and draw over it!


Dont I? How exactly am I intended to create this ''animated matte'' mentioned in that definition? The only work I''ve done with graphics is coding to make them work, I''ve never created any of my own, but I''ve been starting myself off with some basics, and this ''rotoscoping'' sounds like something I''d be interested to learn of. Just because it seems simple to you doesnt mean it is to others.

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Rotoscoping flash tutorial
found this by typing in "how to rotoscope" in google. sometimes throwing a couple extra helpful words like how to can help out. instructions, directions, tutorials, and lessons all are words to that could refine a search. that flash tutorial on rotoscoping was the 2nd result in the list. It explains the generalized process of how to do it extremely well.

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Ah, yes - that tutorial is excellent. Thanks for the link and the searching advice iNfuSeD.

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quote:
Original post by rizwanahmed24
hello
i am the same person who asked abt the design of Prince Of Persia couple of days ago, i am interested in making the original POP1 for mobiles not POP3D, i asked abt the sort of 3D view of POP which gave the impression that if i want to develop POP3D using MIDP2, no, thats not the case, what i m intersted in is that POP1 has a inclined view not like other 2D games which have straight 2D view, so how i can do this, and also the collision detection, screen scrolling , how can i do these things
Hope its now clear that i m asking abt POP1 which was developed more than a decade ago
bye


I believe the visual style is a form of forced perspective. A similar style was used in the original "Theme Park" game by Bullfrog.

The style is similar to the more common style popularly known as "isometric", which is seen in many Sim [SUBJECT] games and the likes of ''Rollercoaster Tycoon''.

Drawing graphics in a forced perspective viewpoint isn''t particularly difficult if your graphics artist knows what he''s doing. In POP1, the game ignored the perspective effect by ensuring all the sprites were placed on the same 2D plane halfway ''into'' the screen. Collisions are much easier to handle this way as the same technique as would be used for, say, a Mario Brothers-type visual style can be applied.

Rotoscoping is a surprisingly easy technique. Just get your video footage into the computer and use an art package that can deal with such footage to create the animation. All you do is trace over the bits of the video footage to create the outline of your animation, then fill in the details as you would normally do. (A "matte" is the film/TV term equivalent to a "mask".)

To produce the POP animations, Jordan Mechner created footage of an actor--I think he borrowed his brother for the purpose, though my memory is a bit hazy on this--against a simple backdrop performing the movements. The footage was then brought onto the computer and the artwork produced by tracing over the footage, touching up as necessary, frame by frame. (The simple background is needed to ensure the artist always has a good image of the actor.)

Software for this is surprisingly cheap. I would probably use Corel Painter 8. This has a dedicated (but little known) animation and tracing mode and has additional features to ensure accurate registration of the animation. Photoshop isn''t a package I use any more, but it does support a filmstrip mode if my memory serves. I don''t think it''s quite as suited as Painter 8, but if you already have it, you could do worse than try it out.

PaintShop Pro 8 doesn''t support any of the movie file formats itself, but it comes with Animation Shop 3 which does.

--
Sean Timarco Baggaley.

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
When an enemy was encountered, pressing the Shift key drew (and sheathed!) the sword, Up parried a blow, Space thrust the sword and Left and Right cause the Prince to advance and retreat (in classical sparring pose, natch!)


In the version I played, shift caused him to thrust, and down caused him to sheath it.

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