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I''m writing a solar system trivia game (trial version available in a couple weeks). I''m getting question content by researching various journals, websites, books, etc. A typical question is something like: Q Mercury has a large core made of which element? a. Hydrogen b. Magnesium c. Carbon d. Iron Now, this type of info can be gleaned from any of the aforementioned sources. Do I need to include some kind of bibliography for stuff like this? If so, which do I choose if there are multiple sources? I''m phrasing the questions myself based on the material I research, not copying word for word. -- Dave Mikesell Software

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Usual disclaimer - I am not a lawyer. Talk to one if you are unsure.

If you are creating the questions based on general knowledge you have learned from a number of sources then there shouldn''t be any legal problems. If you want to include a bibliography so that users can do further reading then go ahead.

Dan Marchant
Obscure Productions (www.obscure.co.uk)
Game Development & Design consultant

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Does trivial pursuit have a bibliography? (I guess those questions are not that relevant to science)..

I would say no. Justt because there will never be proof of "Where you got your info from".

Off topic, is the answer d) iron?

Almost all stars/planets have iron as core, just because it''s the most dense abundant mineral.. is that correct?

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I am not a lawyer either, but facts like that are not protected by copyright, so you are free to ask questions like that, as long as you don't steal the verbatim from another trivia game.

[edited by - twanvl on March 4, 2004 4:18:47 PM]

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quote:
Original post by superdeveloper
Does trivial pursuit have a bibliography? (I guess those questions are not that relevant to science)..

I would say no. Justt because there will never be proof of "Where you got your info from".

Off topic, is the answer d) iron?

Almost all stars/planets have iron as core, just because it''s the most dense abundant mineral.. is that correct?


Yes, it''s iron.

--
Dave Mikesell Software

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quote:
Original post by twanvl
I am not a lawyer either, but facts like that are not protected by copyright, so you are free to ask questions like that, as long as you don''t steal the verbatim from another trivia game.

[edited by - twanvl on March 4, 2004 4:18:47 PM]


I am not a lawyer either, but my wife is (and an IP lawyer to boot). twanvl is correct -- individual facts are not copyrightable and are free for the taking (collections of facts are more complicated and typically protected).

Your example question is a perfect example of a non-copyrightable fact.

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