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picklejuice

where did you guys pick up all this stuff?

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where did you guys learn all this, independant study or school? (if so, where exactly?) I''m trying to learn maths more on you guys'' level, but there doesn''t seem to be a learning curve here so I assume you guys got this in college?

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almost all of my math (calculus ab/bc & multi-variable calc) and physics i got in high school. Linear algebra i''ve self taught myself as it became necessary for 3D programming.

coding i largely learned in high school and college and self-taught a lot of the more advanced c/c++ && openGL/DirectX stuff. My first couple of jobs in the internet BOOM were largely responsible for refining my coding skills by forcing me to work on large projects and give lots of thought to architecture/code organization and extensibility.

most of my game specific knowledge was self taught by taking on the exercise of writing a game engine & multiplayer code for a 1st/3rd person game that never got off the ground but made a solid demo. as with the coding above, my game industry job has been largely responsible for helping to organize my thinking for my game coding.

so in summary: education -> self-learning -> on the job training, with the latter 2 intermingling in the end. i still read a lot of literature and teach myself things all the time while the jobbo continues to force more learning down my throat

-me

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I''m talking about programming, but it applies to anything.

One thing at a time. If you''re good, two things at a time. :-)
It didn''t happen overnight, happend over time, honest.

Books, books, books.

And it never stops, keep on learning.

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I am sure most people her learned maths from highschool and college, programming was self-learning, and others started to learn at college. The more advanced graphics programming was done on there own.

Myself, I started coding at an early age, on a basic level, I learned a great deal more at a tech school I went too then I am learning even more stuff from .NET to graphics programming on my own since my job requires that I know .NET.

My maths well I will be going to college to learn what I should have in HS.

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I learned some math in highschoool took the general math classes required... and after sitting on this comp a lot and learning assembly, c++, and other various languages I got good at the general concept and flow of how lots of mathmatical things work and gradually learned more, I plan to take a college class this summer on math. I will be out of highschool and it would be nice to take another math class mainly because I've always liked math, I have already taught myself lots of what I'll be learning though from reading drmath.com so it shouldn't be TOO complicated. I tend to be really good at the concept of how it works but I don't understand lots of the advanced calculus stuff because I never got to take calculus.

I however helped in my math teachers class for advanced algebra which was basically Alebgra Topics + College Algebra in one class, but I never took the class however mainly because I get sick easily and when I get sick I fall really far behind. That same math teacher was my math teacher for like all my years in highschool mainly because I really learned easily from him because he is genius and could answer other questions I had.

Which made me like math and I got really good at it, (since a few years before this in gradeschool I fell behind in math even though for a-lot of years before that I was really far ahead in math.) He knows I could take the class and pass, but he also agreed that since I get sick easily I would probably fall behind sometime and it would be kinda hard to get caught up.

So I ended up helping him in his class as a teacher assisant a few times, and it was in the advanced class and he let me do all the same work as them and take all the same tests and he would grade me on the papers and such and I learned a lot of advanced things from that I even bought a TI 83+ calculator.

Oh yea, and my math teacher is the teacher that sponsors my highschools robotics club, they challenge robots at compatitions and build a new one every year.

[edited by - DevLiquidKnight on March 4, 2004 12:21:02 AM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Mostly just "doing it"

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I slacked in high school, but only over the last year and a half or so I''ve been back in college and I''ve always had a mathematics class every semester and now going beyond the Calculus II level. Math just takes doing alot of problems. I see some people that study assigned sections out of the textbook and then do maybe one or two problems in that section and move on to the next one. While that may be fine for some people, most that follow that technique do very poorly. Word problems would be my weakest area, and its something that I work on improving. Word problems should be fun though, because its applying your knowledge in a very real and practical manner. If you aren''t in college yet, don''t worry, because if and when you do go, you can take successively higher math classes each and every semester till you''re drowning in it.

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Self taught BASIC on a C64 all the way up to C++ on x86.
Took some C++ in college to pick up what I missed elsewhere.
Self taught MS VB6 and VB.Net, and now C#.

Math and physics I learned in school and re-learned to do 3d games. Still haven''t learned multi-var calc.

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all you need for a start is a basic understanding of linear algebra and trig (vector maths / cartesian systems / polar systems / basic trigonometry / matrices, possibly quaternions although they are quite abstract).

then for physics, a good understanding of newtonian physics (forces, mass, torques, impulses, momentum, inertia, friction and restitution, simple integrations and derivations are the basis of particle and rigid body physics).

then collision detection, physics simulation and other maths intensive stuff just rely on that knowledge.

You''ll find it easier to draw stuff on paper to get a clear picture of what''s going on (except quaternions, which are a mindf**k).

then from there, a lot comes from experience and experimentations. All that is pretty much A-level maths and physics. You keep building up your knowledge, and after a little while it is second nature.

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