• Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Game Programming Careers

This topic is 5099 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Ive been programming for about 2-3 years now, im fairly good at C++ and other languages. I do want to pursue a career in games programming but im just not good at maths, it just doesnt come easy to me if i were to even learn somthing simple id have to sit for hours trying to understand.. So my question is, what kind of careers in games programming dont require alot of maths? And what should i improve on and do to increase my chances of a carreer in games programming? Because otherwise im stuck programming things i can allready do!. Regards Ash. [edited by - ACAC on March 6, 2004 7:01:23 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
hmm.. so you probably want to stay away from graphics and physics. i dont know how common it is do some hardcore sound effects for which you better know the theory of it inside out. but the overall architecture, scripting systems and a few other things should be quite possible without a lot of math.

i guess one approach would be to check site like gamasutra for job offers and see what they need/expect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
You could probably do some tools work or GUI work. Maybe AI if you''ve got the knack of it. Lack of math skills will really cripple your ability in the graphics end -- unfortunately this will cripple your chance of getting an eye-catching demo.

I''d shoot for AI myself. There is always a shortage of good AI programmers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AI is pretty maths intensive if you do anything more then production or expert systems.
Buy a decent maths book and get better ;-)

In the industry an end product speaks volumes, start off with attainable goals and demos, and delve into the maths as appropriate.

"Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 9.0" by Frank D. Luna explains the maths via 3d graphics examples... always easiest to learn by doing.

Rob Callan has written a few books on AI that have a good learning curve too if you do decide to go down the AI route.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tools, networking, sound, interfaces, input, low-level hardware stuff, general game programming (ie putting the game-play around the grphics/physics engines)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Excuse me for the question, but i cannot understand the role of math in programming?
What should you know about it?
What more than coordinate systems,matrices,binary operators?
I have also heard many times that you need to study math in order to be a decent programmer but why?
Maybe i would understand it better if you give me an example.
Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
For 3D graphics, you should understand (at the very least) linear algebra and trigonometry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Honestly, all programming requires at least a solid understanding of algebra to exploit its functionality. Other then that, its usualy looking up formulaes when you need them, and or working things out by hand and doing little "hacks". When coming up with my isohex rasterization engine, I had to come up with a process of turning mouse coordinates into the current map position (No, i didnt like the tutorials out there). Everything I looked at gave me extreemly hard (and processor heavy) formulaes, so I developed my own method. By dividing the tiles up into "pips and vents", and using some common sense, I was able to achieve this. (mostly using absolute graphs taken from alegebra II level) I do have a background in math going as far as statistics, but I dont think it is necessary.

*please note, when going into 3d, you are changing alot of things, and much more mathamatics is required. If you can convert a 2d equasion to 3d though, you should do fine. As long as you study up on matrix mathamatics (AlgebraII/Trig).

Thanks
Richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by proveren
Excuse me for the question, but i cannot understand the role of math in programming?

The study of mathematical topics enhances your general problem solving skills, which is very helpful in programming. A lot of the math you are taught at school/college most probably won''t actually be used directly in your work, though it''s still very worthwhile to learn this math because it makes you a better thinker/problem solver. But I''m not exactly speaking from experience here, so feel free to ignore me.

Oh, and speaking of the math that you''ll actually use whilst programming, it really depends on what type of programming you''re doing. For example, if want to be a graphics programmer then you''d better know your stuff with linear algebra and trigonometry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you have problems understanding mathematical topics?

here in germany you have grades from 1-6 where 1 is the best

in the 8th grad i usually got 5 in math until i started learning the math we did in school and suddenly i get a 2++ tending to 1, well don t tell me you have problem learning math, your only problem is you lack some of the foundations, once you got those the rest won t be a problem anymore

of course there are people who have problems with math, but in most cases its poor imagination, just start with the simplest foundations and you will get the hang of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most of the game industry programmer entrance-tests focus on a lot of math anyway. So you''d be better off knowing it. Linear Algebra and Trig''s kung fu is best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Anonymous Poster
Basiror may have the solution for you. Learn math. Seriously. Take it easy and go make to the level that you started feeling lost and ground yourself on those topics till you no longer feel lost. If you realize that you are still missing something go back even further.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement