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Modding A Game Without SDK or Scripting Lang, Possible?

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There are quite a number of games out there that if tweaked just a little bit would be totally kick ass and bring new life to their existence. Also, there are plenty of games that would dramatically increase re-playability if they had just that extra option. What I am wondering from the "Mod Gods" out there, is it feasible to take a game like, for example, EA Sports Madden 2004 (or others) that does not have an SDK or scripting language and never will and attempt to mod it in some fashion? I realize with an incredible programmer and the patience of time, just about anything can be done. But would it be worth the effort in hopes of making the mod come to fruition? Take care, PS - Yes, I do have a mod in mind for Madden 2004, I believe it would be quite an improvement to the game and bring a whole new life to it. MJG

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Well to be honest I don''t know if Hex Editing would accomplish what I am designing.

Basically what I am designing is a new play mode for Madden, there would be no editing of how the game engine actually works. The mod would just be adding a new game mode ala Franchise, Practice, Season and what have you.

Sorry for being vague, just don''t want to let the cat our of the bag just yet. I also understand you may need more information on the mod before it could be determinded if it is possible.

Just trying to get an idea if modding a game that is not normally modded doable.

Take care,

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What you want to achieve would require access to the game''s
source code. Reverse engineering - apart from being illegal -
would require too much effort.

So to answer your question directly: Modding is possible
in principle but it''s practically impossible - if
only due to legal reasons.

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Is there a definite guide that tells the legal limitations of reverse engineering programs in the US?

Scott Simontis
e-mail:ageofscott@NOSPAM.comcast.net
AIM:ssimontis

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quote:
Original post by Kylotan
Reverse engineering is not illegal in most countries (despite corporations trying to make it so).


What about EULAs then?

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I think an excellent example of what you are looking for is Multitheft Auto (www.mta.tk ?!).

They''ve basically added multiplayer support to gta3 and gta:vc although how much was already implemented I don''t know and also added there own features/gameplay etc.

Check it out and maybe ask those guys.

-Meto

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Multitheft from what I've seen is an external app that utilizes exsiting code within Grant Theft Auto (Rockstar Games added multiplayer support but never implemented it...I think) though it does appear that Multitheft adds options to the game once you run the game via this external app. I honestly have no idea how the options were added to the game, or if the app is just tricking the game into thinking these options exsit. Or if the app just accesses this code that Rockstar put in the game to begin with.

I really don't know if an external app could be used for what I want to accomplish. Though i'm sure if someone could figure out EA's dat files, then an editor of some sort could be used.

Also, Multitheft is not considered illegal because Rockstar, though they do not "support" it, do allow the team to continue development. EA on the other had may frown on someone attempting to "change", in their minds, a perfect game.

Take care,

MJG



[edited by - mjg on March 8, 2004 1:51:43 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Kylotan
Most EULAs attempt to take away your rights. They are not always legal or binding.


So this implies that reverse-engineering might be perfectly legal
in the EU? I still doubt that, but then again - I''m not a lawyer


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This is true. Got a really good pinball game from Microsoft and it said I cannot reverse-engineer it.




However, if you look on the internet you will see where courts have ruled reverse-engineering legal; this is mainly so competitors can look at each other's implementation and create better and better products, which is good for consumers. I believe the way the law has been ruled is that the person reverse-engineering the product has to write a description of what the program does-- no copying of the actual assembly or whatever-- and then that person passes the written description to others to write the actual program.





[edited by - Sluginator on March 10, 2004 10:27:24 PM]

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I can''t think of any country where reverse engineering is actually totally illegal. It''s a myth that software developers would like you to believe. Imagine if you were prohibited from taking your own car apart to see how it worked.

Look: here and
here.

Other applications of reverse engineering may run up against different issues depending on where you are and what you''re doing.

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Someone needed to point out that the EU in EULA stands for End User, as in End User License Agreement, not for European Union.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
In Germany (don''t know if this is valid in the whole EU) reverse-engineering is legal. You may even fix errors yourself in the code, and study how it works.
All other agreements that forbid this are rendered invalid by this law. And I pretty much like it

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