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benutne

Good place for C#?

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Where is a good place to learn some intermediate C# topics? I''m not all that great at programming, but I''ve made a few functional programs with the help of some friends (a Timeclock program and an XML catalog manager that stores mesh and texture information.) What I REALLY need are some "assignments" of sorts. I''ve learned the most by doing, and not reading. The two programs I''ve made have taught me more than anything I''ve read from books. TIA

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You''ll get the most pleasure out of it if you''re making something that you will actually use (or at least that someone will actually use). Utility programs are a good place to start I think.
Think of utilities that you or your friends/family would find useful.
Here''s a list off the top of my head. A few of these I''ve written myself at one point or another. Many (read: all) of these are available in some form or another, free or commercial, and you may decide you don''t want to spend time writing things when there are perfectly good alternatives, but that''s your choice.
A calendar; calculator; note pad (to easily write short notes to yourself, not something to replace a text editor); something to find broken shortcuts; a reminder utility (something that sits in the system tray); a source code formatter; something to search through your file system looking for redundant copies of files; something to download and archive sets of web pages (the equivalent of wget, but probably with fewer features and a nice GUI); file format converters, a chat client for your favourite chat system (IRC, MSN, whatever; assuming you can find or reverse engineer protocol specifications); a very light-weight app to sit in your system tray and check your mail every 5 minutes (more or less useful depending on what email client you use).

Any of those would be relatively easy to write. Some could be written easily in less than a day, others might take up to a month if you want to include lots of features (longer if you have a life). Don''t forget though that after you''ve written the program, that isn''t the end of it. Use it, or give it/sell it to people who will use it. Get feedback. Fix bugs (there will be bugs). Add features that would be useful. Remove features that aren''t used. Tune the interface so that the things done most often are very quick to do. Fix the new bugs that you''ve introduced.

John B

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