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Jeeo

Commander Keen

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Hey, does any one know what language Commander Keen was written by? Commander Keen or Duke Nukem, either''s good. Thanks

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Just a guess, but I''d say a combination of C and assembly. That''s basically what id software has worked in right through Quake 3.

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What the hell? Why can''t he/she know what language it was written in. It may be pointles to you, but who cares. If you don''t know the answer, don''t post just to post.

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quote:
Original post by Promit
Just a guess, but I''d say a combination of C and assembly. That''s basically what id software has worked in right through Quake 3.


ID didn''t make Commander Keen or Duke Nukem. They were made by 3D Realms.

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quote:
Original post by Mr_Ridd
What the hell? Why can''t he/she know what language it was written in. It may be pointles to you, but who cares. If you don''t know the answer, don''t post just to post.

i was curious why the OP wanted to know, that''s all. i didn''t flame or anything (notice the "not to be rude" part?)... hell, i didn''t even say it was pointless... sheesh!

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quote:

ID didn't make Commander Keen or Duke Nukem. They were made by 3D Realms.


ID did make Commander Keen, but you're right about 3D Realms making Duke Nukem. Oh and I agree with Promit, Commander Keen will have been writen in C and ASM.

[edited by - Monder on March 18, 2004 6:15:11 AM]

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quote:
Original post by yspotua
quote:
Original post by Promit
Just a guess, but I''d say a combination of C and assembly. That''s basically what id software has worked in right through Quake 3.

ID didn''t make Commander Keen or Duke Nukem. They were made by 3D Realms.

Commander Keen was created by John Carmack, Adrian Carmack, John Romero, and someone-else-I-don''t-remember-although-he-is-famous-too when they were working at Softdisk.



Muhammad Haggag
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AFAIK it was ID Software (notice the id-software-pickups throughout the game?) which was working for SoftDisk (monthly issues of games).

I think they used Turbo C plus assembly (which people had to do that time).

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This is going little off-topic but as long as I know/remember Commander Keen was published by Apogee Software and yes, they were working on SoftDisk that time (when working on first Commander Keen) but they did it without telling to SoftDisk (and still by using their computers) and published it through Apogee..

and the fourth guy that Coder didn´t remember was Tom Hall I guess (game designer).

I have read "Masters of doom" (great book!!) couple of times so that´s where the info (it can still be that I don´t remember everything right).

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Hey, great question, I''d like to know that too. I suspect it''s C and assembly, as the others said. And you are correct that it was ID software that made the game. You can validate this by visiting their website. Also, as someone else pointed out, there were several pickups on id throughout Commander Keen.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
its easy

Commander Keen - id software - C & ASM
Duke Nukem - Build engine - 3D Realms-Apogee - public source code - C & ASM

100% sure

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Every game id Software has ever made except for Doom 3 has been C & ASM. That incldues Quake 3 (the software renderer is ASM).

Pretty much every DOS game in existence that uses graphics is ASM or C & ASM, mostly because DOS graphics are really hard (impossible?) to use without ASM, and it''s a real pain doing an entire project in ASM so they sue C for other parts.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
id first started using c and asm with wolfenstine 3d. keen was built using something older like pascal.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
id first started using c and asm with wolfenstine 3d. keen was built using something older like pascal.

Uhm.
1: Pascal and C are about the same age. Both were in general use long before Commander Keen was around.
2: id certainly was using C long before Wolf3D.
3: You wouldn''t be able to make Commander Keen without assembly; it''s required for the graphics routines.


"Sneftel is correct, if rather vulgar." --Flarelocke

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Having disassembled most of the Keen engine, I can tell you with 100% certainty that it used C and assembly.

However, assembly was in no way at all "required" for graphics. Why would you think this? Graphics in DOS are just writing to EGA (in this case) ports and dumping pixels into memory, both of which C can do quite well.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Promit
Every game id Software has ever made except for Doom 3 has been C & ASM. That incldues Quake 3 (the software renderer is ASM).



Except Quake 3 doesn''t have a software renderer...

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Onemind
You could probably email Id and get the Commander Keen code for yourselve - they''ve already GPLed DOOM/Quake.


Id doesn''t have it anymore.

But John Romero does.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Promit
Every game id Software has ever made except for Doom 3 has been C & ASM. That incldues Quake 3 (the software renderer is ASM).



Except Quake 3 doesn''t have a software renderer...




I always assumed it did, and never bothered to check, lol. Well, the software renderer, if there was one, would be at least partially ASM. So there.

quote:

However, assembly was in no way at all "required" for graphics. Why would you think this? Graphics in DOS are just writing to EGA (in this case) ports and dumping pixels into memory, both of which C can do quite well.


How do you call interrupts in C?


By the way, anyone happen to have a live id software e-mail I can send a question to?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by Promit
How do you call interrupts in C?



Why would you need to?

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