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timmay314

Good C# tutorial?

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I know C++ pretty well and can use D3D and win32, but I''ve seen managed code in C# and it looks much easier and is still pretty fast. I finally got a copy of Visual Studio .NET (2003), but I don''t know C# at all (I''m also confused by the layout that''s different from Visual C++ 6). Can someone show me to a good C# tutorial?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by wyrd
Plenty out there - search google.


He asked for a good one. Google won''t separate the wheat from the chaff. Quit being an ass.

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Good point Anonymous,

I can''t stand that 99% of the people here say go search google. Sometimes its needed other times just down right annyoing...

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and yet there still hasn''t been a good answer

try this one, m looking at it right now
http://www.softsteel.co.uk/tutorials/cSharp/contents.html

let me know if you find a good one for Directx or opengl

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quote:
Good point Anonymous,

I can't stand that 99% of the people here say go search google. Sometimes its needed other times just down right annyoing...

(not directed at OP)

Why should I take time to answer something that is found on the first or second page of Google? Or in MSDN for that matter? Or has already been answered four times this week? I have no sympathy for people who can't learn to fend for themselves and actually buckle down and spend sometime researching things on the web. Sometimes, more than an hour looking up information and sifting through posts. That is one way to learn. IMO that is far more effective a teacher than simply asking every single little question on the forum. If you knew how many silly Win32 questions I have had, I could have easily filled up the first page when I do work on Win32. But, they all end up at groups.google.com, and occasionally I annoy the heck out of daerid and company in #programmers with them.

All I'm saying is, learn to be independent, not dependent on any forum or group of people. Dependence of this sort is grating to all parties involved over time.

As for learning a language, I'd go with a book, can't beat good old paper. Failing that, I'd suggest making a default WinForms application and just feeling your way around. Add a few controls and try doing simple stuff like that, and move up from there. I think at work we had a few C# books but I used them for reference mostly. There is a wealth of code out there, learn from it.

[edited by - antareus on March 18, 2004 9:39:36 PM]

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quote:

He asked for a good one. Google won't separate the wheat from the chaff. Quit being an ass.



I wasn't being an ass. What I might consider a good C# tutorial may differ from what he considers a good C# tutorial.

How about you provide some actual help rather than making random posts as an anon?

[edited by - wyrd on March 18, 2004 11:33:37 PM]

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quote:
Original post by antareus
Why should I take time to answer something that is found on the first or second page of Google? Or in MSDN for that matter? Or has already been answered four times this week? I have no sympathy for people who can't learn to fend for themselves and actually buckle down and spend sometime researching things on the web. Sometimes, more than an hour looking up information and sifting through posts. That is one way to learn. IMO that is far more effective a teacher than simply asking every single little question on the forum. If you knew how many silly Win32 questions I have had, I could have easily filled up the first page when I do work on Win32. But, they all end up at groups.google.com, and occasionally I annoy the heck out of daerid and company in #programmers with them.



Don't be such a hypocritical ass. The OP had a completely valid question and just wanted opinions. Looking through your profile, 80%+ of the questions you have asked are actually trivially answered with a few minutes of research. I mean no offense, but I completely agree with most everybody else here -- telling the OP to google isn't going to accomplish anything besides give somebody a bad taste in their mouth for the GameDev forums.

Now on the other hand if I see another post of somebody asking why their DirectX app is running at 65fps instead of 400fps after upgrading the code to Direct3D 9, I will explode.

[edited by - haro on March 19, 2004 4:02:11 AM]

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If you object telling people links, don''t tell them to search - you use up as much, or more, of your time ranting than just helping!
Isn''t one of the points of a community that they help by sharing information? OO teaches us don''t reinvent the wheel - everyone doing the same search is pointless if people can suggest useful links.

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quote:
Original post by SarsDP
and yet there still hasn''t been a good answer

try this one, m looking at it right now
http://www.softsteel.co.uk/tutorials/cSharp/contents.html

let me know if you find a good one for Directx or opengl
That tut does look pretty good on first impressions, I''ve been ytoying with the idea of learning it too. Does msdn have a good series of tuts or just isolated articles (like for asp.net grrr)?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
A very good one is Dr. GUI .NET (it''s on MSDN).

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Guest Anonymous Poster
If you''re such a cheapass that you won''t buy a book to learn a language, then wtf are you doing in this industry?

quote:
Original post by timmay314
Bah, I don''t want to spend money on a book unless I can''t find a good, free online tutorial. Are there any good ones online?


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My recommendations are as follows:

Use the MSDN tutorials (msdn.microsoft.com) and buy a book. There is no tutorial that can substitute for a good book, such as Deitel and Deitel''s C#: How to Program. I already know C# but finally got myself around to taking a look at that book to see if it''s worth recommending to people and it definately is. The book as is good as any other in their series and seems to be a good teacher and have all the reference information you need as well. Believe me, spending the extra $65 on a book is well worth it.

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quote:

If you''re such a cheapass that you won''t buy a book to learn a language, then wtf are you doing in this industry?



I''m a high school student who makes $5 a week allowance. I have far too much school work to get a job, and probably won''t have a lot of time to mess around with C#. Spending $60 on a book is 12 weeks of allowance, or about 3 months. I don''t want to spend a quarter of my yearly allowance on something that I can get any other way.

Thanks for the tutorials, to those who recommended them. Since you all seem to recommend it, I''ll look into getting a book on ebay or something.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by timmay314
quote:

If you''re such a cheapass that you won''t buy a book to learn a language, then wtf are you doing in this industry?



I''m a high school student who makes $5 a week allowance. I have far too much school work to get a job, and probably won''t have a lot of time to mess around with C#. Spending $60 on a book is 12 weeks of allowance, or about 3 months. I don''t want to spend a quarter of my yearly allowance on something that I can get any other way.

Thanks for the tutorials, to those who recommended them. Since you all seem to recommend it, I''ll look into getting a book on ebay or something.


Check your local library first. If you''re in a larger city they may actually have some good books. Also, if you''re near a university your high school may have a program where you can check out books from the universities library. A lot of stores have bargain bins too. I recently went to a used books store that was going out of business. I could''ve bought a ton of stuff, but there wasn''t much I didn''t already have or was interestedin at the time. Don''t buy fad books either. Buy the books on fundamentals, scrape by with on-line tutorials, and then buy the reference books when you have the money. There''s no use buying every C#/.Net book you come across because they''re 99% crap and 99% the same.

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I''ll go against the grain and say that if you actually know C++, Win32 and DirectX as well as you said, you don''t really need a book. Unlike C++(for which you DO need a book), C# the language is fairly simple to learn and a good tutorial in addition to the language spec should suffice.

I still haven''t read a book on C# the language, although I have read quite a few on the framework.

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quote:
Original post by SarsDP
and yet there still hasn''t been a good answer

try this one, m looking at it right now
http://www.softsteel.co.uk/tutorials/cSharp/contents.html

let me know if you find a good one for Directx or opengl


That looks like a good tutorial. I''m also looking for a good guide to C#/DirectX (there''s NeHe code for C#/OpenGL), as I''m a beginner in both. I don''t really care about unmanaged DirectX.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
http://gotdotnet.com/quickstart/howto/

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