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Not an easy study or topic to undertake.

But if I am correct in assuming that this is for somekind of academic challenge such as a degree (projects in computing are in my case academic (research) rather than technical (working product that gets you a job and gives you experiance))...

You would want to devise a way to test the effectiveness of the implementation methods.

So for example maybe building the game in the latest version of OpenGL using the newest methods for creating things.... Then doing the same thing with an older version.

(DirectX example: Drawing Primitives using triangle lists \ strips which are supported in the latest versions and then try to do the same thing in an older version (before ver 5.0) using the Execute Buffers)
I don''t use OpenGL, so I don''t know its history....


Just an idea.....

Also... why DOES it have to be a game... you could just as easily justify a simple application that renders a number of cubes, uses sound and any other things that you wanted without turning it into a game.... although a game is a lot more fun

I reckon you need to figure out what your aims are:
Aims: What the actual goal is (How well has OpenGL advanced since it was first created)
Objectives: What you are going to do to complete your aims (Build sets of applications that do the same thing, but make use of the new developments that each new version brought)

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quote:
Original post by aeleneski
Well I am doing an independant study using OpenGL. By December I am supposed to have a completed project, which in my case will be a game. I am supposed to show how technology has advanced and all so I was thinking of doing a 3d version of Spacewar. Does this sound like a good idea? Or is there something better that you guys can think of?


It would be a better idea if you coded the game with a split-screen option. In one screen (while you play) the game would be seen as it originally was, and in the other the new kicking ass 3D version. Then you could go fullscreen any of both and notice the difference (if any )

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If you are looking to demonstrate how technology has evolved and you have access to a newer graphics card you could demonstrate the power of programmable shaders by performing some sort of technique that is normally done in software on the hardware. A presentation I was at yesterday demonstrated the use of programmable shaders to do global illumination but there are lots of other things that can be done, per pixel lighting, phong shading etc etc.

"Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day, drown a man in the water and the fish will eat for a week!

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