Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

naqvi

Help needed for getting started with 3D engine development

Recommended Posts

naqvi    100
Dear friends I am new in to game programming so any can any one help me in giving me a direction for getting started with 3D engine development .please give me some links of usefull tutorials which i can read. i''ll be very thankful for your quick answers. Zeeshan --- http://www.shadionline.tk ---

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
naqvi    100
I have heard that DirectX will be the best option for this task so answer me in this regards.

Zeeshan

--- http://www.shadionline.tk ---

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nonpop    122
An extremely useful tip: DON'T START WITH A 3D-ENGINE.
To get started in game development, click on View Forum FAQ above the posts or just click Here.


[edited by - nonpop on March 22, 2004 7:16:05 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
naqvi    100
thanx for your help. but i have got a project to make a 3D engine and i have to work on it.

--- http://www.shadionline.tk ---

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DeepCover    122
What I did to start learning is to start with a single large room - Four walls and a floor. This is where you will learn how to do your calculations for 3d viewing (move forward, back, mouselook). Once you have that, you can build on it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ToohrVyk    1595
Your first step would be the choice of a language, preferably one that supports widely distributed 3D APIs (such as C, C++, C#, VB, but not O''Caml for instance).

Then, you have the choice of either directly starting your 3D engine and learning along the way, or learning the language, API, and design the engine before you actually start coding it. As a rule of thumb, if you start an engine without any prior planning or experience, you''re bound to start it over again every month or so because your design is unexpandable and you can''t add the things you want.

Assuming you want to go the "plan&learn first" way, I would advise you to choose an API ( DirectX is good if you are going for windows only, even better when using a managed language such as C#, which supports directX easily through .NET ) and start creating small demos with it to get a hang of both the API and the language (triangles, rotating triangles, texturing, mesh loading, etc...).

Once you''re done learning the basics, decide on what the final features of your engine will be (dynamic shadows? lightmaps? multipass rendering? culling systems? visibility systems? space partitioning systems? scene hierarchies? bumpmapping? displacement mapping? file formats? etc...), and find a way to make them work together and be easily accessible. This step might take as long as a month if you want to make sure everything will fit in flawlessly.

Now, start coding. Depending on the features you''ve chosen your engine will be between 100 and 1000 functions tall (if you''re ambitious, even more), which involves quite a long time to actually type it in (two months if you''ve already planned everything and doing it full-time, half a year or more if not), and to test it (very important - you DO want your engine to work on the players''/judges''/human resources'' computer, don''t you?).

The minimum time to create a small (by small I mean a basic scene manager with camera, texture and mesh loader, and the ability to choose resolutions easily) engine is something like 3-4 months, every feature you decide to add will just add 1-4 weeks to the whole thing. (Increase this time if you''re working on it part-time, decrease if you have a full-time team on it).

Victor Nicollet, INT13 game programmer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites