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ZadrraS

To all programmers, how well di you learn math and phisics ;]

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Im just curious, how all of you had learned/are learning math and physics at school? (And please, when replying, tell me your grading system). Megrading, between 2 and 10) Math:~8 Physics: 7-8

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It entirely depends on the level of education. A guy who gets 5 in a 1-10 range on a certain year would have got 10 on that range when passing tests from two years below.

Your having a 7-8 in math & physics doesn''t tell me if you know the same math as I do, or if you get 7-8 on math I''ve been mastering for 3 years.

Anyway, my average grades are 5-6 out of 1-10 (actually, 10-12 out of 1-20), but this is due to the (quite higher) level of math and physics I''m studying. But in 2 years I''ll be looking back on these tests and be able to get 10 out of 10.

Victor Nicollet, INT13 game programmer

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Are we talking primary (Elementary) school, high (secondary) school or university level?

Grades are largely irrelevant. It''s what you remember 6 months to a year after learning a topic that really counts, especially in maths and physics, where more advanced topics are usually built on top of earlier work learned.

Furthermore, how you perform in high school is not really an indication of how you will perform at university level (if you choose to go that far). The learning environment is very different, as is the social environment (distractions)!

It''s also very difficult to compare the education equivalence of one country to another. Me telling you that I earned a particular mark on a test in my final year of high school, or final year of university is of little relevance unless you know what the subject material on which I was tested was and can compare that to an equivalent examination level in your system.

Cheers,

Timkin

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Ahem. Quite often some moderators cry cause topics are not directly gamedev related, thus literally waste bandwidth. At least most of these topics are interesting. This one is not. How can you admit such a "loss of bandwith"?

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I don''t think this is a waste of bandwidth. If I understand correctly, the point of this discussion is that the original poster wants to know how much other programmers know about math and physics. The reason, I''m guessing, is to know if he (or she) has a chance of being a successful programmer with his (or her) abilities in this area.

That said, I personally suck at math. Basic algebra and geometry were super simple for me, but when I began working with Calculus, I was screwed. But that didn''t stop me from programming using radian math, for example. I still don''t really understand radians, but I DO use them. With sufficient determination and a willingness to at least try, your math and physics education becomes less of an issue. Especially when working with others. This is why places like GameDev are so important. No one knows it all - except maybe The Carmack . When you have access to other people''s knowledge, through teams, tutorials and forums like this one, what you don''t know becomes less important compared to what you can know...

Rattlehead

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quote:
Original post by Rattlehead
I don''t think this is a waste of bandwidth. If I understand correctly, the point of this discussion is that the original poster wants to know how much other programmers know about math and physics. The reason, I''m guessing, is to know if he (or she) has a chance of being a successful programmer with his (or her) abilities in this area.

Thats exactly why i created this thread
I don''t know how does it work with schools in other countrys, but here, i go to a middle school and when ill finish 12 classes ill go to university, im in 8th class now.


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Guest Anonymous Poster

Realistically, there is little to learn in lower level schooling that will prepare you to be a good game programmer. Physics is actually a subject you will have to un-learn. Implementing physical simulations on a discreet timestepping computer is not helped by classical physics, because one of the main goals of classical physics is to provide tools to model reality (which is not a disceet integration problem).

Math and physics is really only the cream on top of a game (besides matrix math, which is really just simple algebra after a while).

The most important subject you can learn in school is DataBase Design 101. This is really a university level subject, although in todays world it should be a high school course.

To be able to weild complex math in a game, you first need a real-time 3d graphics engine. The best skill you have to attempt this very daunting task is Database design. Pay attention in this class!

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atm in the 12th grade, studying calculas based physics and calculas. our grading system is in precentages %.
physics = 98%
calculas = 105% (our teachers gives loads of extra credit).

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First we have comprehensive school, grades 1-9, then high school or something like that for three years, which I've just finished (the grades I told earlier are from there). University will come next.

EDIT: And, yes -- it doesn't really depend on how well you know math/physics but how well you can apply your knowledge to your games.


[edited by - nonpop on March 23, 2004 9:51:29 AM]

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quote:

Realistically, there is little to learn in lower level schooling that will prepare you to be a good game programmer



Define lower school? If you mean less than university, then I totally disagree. I learnt linear algebra, pretty advanced calculus, geometry ( pretty useless now, when the hell will I use the directrix property of something? ), and so forth. The mechanics I learnt was useful ( did stuff like springed systems, things moving in circles, non-constant acceleration, and so on ), though, only constrained to 2D, it''s pretty arbitary to move it to 3D. This was all upto when I was 18.

You have to remember that you''re unique, just like everybody else.

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