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Are programmers "supply falls short of demand"?

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just curious. in a game company, generally speaking, the employers can always be diveded into two kinds of people: technical employers & artistic employers. i guess technical employers is harder to hire than those artistic ones because there are fewer people who like programming than those who like art. the situation may be different in various countries/regions. what about the situation in US & Canada? thx! [edited by - Challenger17 on March 25, 2004 10:05:35 AM]

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quote:
fewer people who like programming than those who like art


Says who? Liking something and being good at it are two different things. I would say it is just as hard to find good artists as it is to find good programmers.

[edited by - CodeMunkie on March 25, 2004 10:14:17 AM]

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I would disagree. Programming is easier to learn. Like you said it a technical disicipline that has methods for learning and measuring that are clearly defined. While art is ...., well its art. No one can be honestly say what is good art and is not. Its nebulous.

Just look all the open source game projects out there. There always tons of programmers but usually the games lack good graphics, music, sound effects, writing, etc. There are exceptions, but normally its easier to find programmers than artists.

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While it''s true that there are many programmers out there, there are very few who have actually completed a game that''s made a profit. So, in some ways there''s not enough programmers. Having said that, I''ve worked at companies where it appears that an ability to type is enough to get a job as a programmer.

Skizz

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Well I must say, there will always be artists out there willing to draw. The question is what is thier style, and thier medium. And if it works with your project. In regards to programming. This is a hard question as there are different fields. I myself am looking into doing AI programming then moving on to game design (oh my ideas ) . But some programming types may be in more demand then others. And in a situation in which you do independant and merc work, you would always be employeed. The problem is keeping people coming to your website and interested in your work.

There will never be a lack of demand for those with a gift, practice, get good, show em what they havn''t seen and you can get somewhere.

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Good programming is artistic, anyone could learn to programme, but being able to program in a well structures cost effective way is difficult. Have a think, do your comments in your C++ code tell you any more than the line of code itself, it is known that programmer''s comments say why its doing what it does. Also being able to develope an app/game with a team is a major factor. Im 19 and developing a graphics engine which is currently at around 2000 lines, ill look back in a years time and wonder why i did it the way i did. Writing a program i easy, but being a programmer is difficult.

ACE

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quote:
Original post by yspotua
Programming is easier to learn. Like you said it a technical disicipline that has methods for learning and measuring that are clearly defined.

So it's just like math. Yet, for some reason, most of the pupils in our school take the path with less math and more languages and such. Shouldn't languages (not the programming ones ) be harder to learn due to their huge word lists and all the exceptions their grammar have..?


[edited by - nonpop on March 25, 2004 2:00:07 PM]

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HA HA!!!

Tangenting off the last post:

I would rather solve a equation than "find what is wrong with this sentence." Although I currently do like both math and english, math because its not too difficult for me, and english because my teacher dosn''t do lame "make your paper this long" assignments and I have learned to write alot better (if I want, I don''t "want" on this post).

Anyways, I will say that most markets have plenty of people to chose from. Game development is the same. We got probably 5000 (over estimate?) on these boards that would be interested in taking a game dev job in a heartbeat, and only 50 that would actually be profitable to the company. Question is what group you are in, or want to hire from. I know where I''m at right now, and so do all the other 4950 people here with me.

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I agree, i believe that in 5-10 years time i may possibly be profitable for now im still learning the techniques of direct. What keeps me motivated is that i know that with practice i could program a better program than alot of people in terms of its logic. There are 1000s out there who can code more DirectX but i find it a challenge binding that and general C++ skill into one package

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quote:
Original post by nonpop
So it''s just like math. Yet, for some reason, most of the pupils in our school take the path with less math and more languages and such. Shouldn''t languages (not the programming ones ) be harder to learn due to their huge word lists and all the exceptions their grammar have..?

But in math there''s generally one right answer, whereas people can rely on their BS skills to get them through some other courses. So math is generally more critically graded, but you might be able to write a 10-page crap essay that won''t get picked over as closely.

Tadd
- WarbleWare

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quote:
Original post by Challenger17
just curious.
in a game company, generally speaking, the employers can always be diveded into two kinds of people: technical employers & artistic employers. i guess technical employers is harder to hire than those artistic ones because there are fewer people who like programming than those who like art.

the situation may be different in various countries/regions. what about the situation in US & Canada?

thx!

[edited by - Challenger17 on March 25, 2004 10:05:35 AM]



Actually in the US today your quote would actually be "demand falls short of supply" and programmers are losing jobs by the dozen.

An estimated 350,000 developers are up to get cut this year alone in the US.


Also people in design, 3d modelling, and animation are now making a lot more money and are in higher demand than programmers.

[edited by - Imperil on March 25, 2004 2:52:44 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Imperil
Also people in design, 3d modelling, and animation are now making a lot more money and are in higher demand than programmers.



but people on www.cgtalk.com don't say so. they said:" nowadays, everyone wants to be an animator." and the job situation seems very hard for them. i heard from one guy who said in his 30-students animation class, only 10 of them got a job after graduation.

sorry i had no idea about the amount of developers in US.

[edited by - Challenger17 on March 25, 2004 10:15:16 PM]

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