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i`m trying to learn how to make games, but i dont know how to get started, i dont know things are etc. so i put up some questions for the pro`s to answer... 1. is there a good tutorial on how to get started? it should cover: -good explaining on what things are -how to get started(duh..) -making your first game(basic 2d thingey) 2. i want to learn C++, is this for hard for a newbie? 3. what games did you guys start with? 4. i want to make a 3D RPG game, how much experience do i need for to even start thinking about it?

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quote:
Original post by Zainal
1. is there a good tutorial on how to get started?


I don''t think so. There are a lot of beginner''s tutorials out there and I''m sure someone else will point you to them, but last I checked they were crappy.
quote:

2. i want to learn C++, is this for hard for a newbie?


Maybe. There''s no reason not to try, though, unless you want to start with a nicer language like Python.
quote:

3. what games did you guys start with?


Space Invaders
quote:

4. i want to make a 3D RPG game, how much experience do i need for to even start thinking about it?


A lot. You''re not going to be there for a very long time, and you will never ever complete it without help from a lot of motivated people, no matter how long you spend on it.

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Regarsding question 2, I would say probably...I know someone that is tyring this and he finds it very difficult. I would suggest starting with something super easy like QBASIC to get some concepts down before trying c++. This is what I did and I never had any problems with C++.
3. I made a Space Invaders game!!.
4. Umm...You nedd TONS of experiance to do this. It isn''t impossible, but it isn''t easy.

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1,2.)
Seriously consider Scheme.

How to Design Programs
Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
Schemers.org

3.)Number guessing games, chat bot, Ball-block games (one player pong, 2 player pong, aykroid). Some suggest starting with a tetris clone but I think that relies on graphics too much and people get stuck trying to make mincey graphics without even making a fun game.

4.) I don't think it's experience per se, but they take a snot load of man hours. More than you have if you worked alone. Your best bet is probably to get good and join a project or two and when you are involved in a community, put your ideas forward and try to form a project group.

[edited by - flangazor on March 25, 2004 1:27:25 PM]

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quote:
Original post by flangazor
1,2.)
Seriously consider Scheme.

How to Design Programs
Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
Schemers.org


That would be an interesting way to start, and definitely not without its benefits. I agree, give it a try.

I'd avoid that second book until you've got some experience, though. I enjoyed it, but you won't unless you deeply appreciate programming.

[edited by - twix on March 25, 2004 1:36:37 PM]

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1) most definitely there is a good place to start. up above in the menu of this site, click on For Beginners under the Resources section. it''s a nice brief "getting your feet on the ground" kind of question.

2) C++ shouldn''t be that hard. C was my first real language ( discounting Basic on the Atari 800 when i was a wee lad ). C++ is essentially C with a lot of extra stuff, but the basic syntax for beginner stuff is the same. there are some good suggested books in the same thinger i pointed out in 1)

3) my first game was a 3D 3rd person FPR/RPG distributed network game based loosely on the books SnowCrash & Neuromancer . i''ve been working on it for about 1.5 yrs and probably at least that many to go in the future

4) you need to at least know whatever language you choose to learn pretty well. i was a Java engineer for about 3 years professionally before i jumped into gaming. knowing how to work on big projects was one of the reasons i decided to choose a big project for myself. i''d start by going through the normal pong->tetris->pacman->3d something iteration if you''re a true beginner to the language. even before that i''d start with text only things or you''ll break your brain quickly.

-me

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In my opinion mate:

1. I bought several directx 7 books and was learning the basics. I have moved onto the DirectX 9 Extensions and that is easier but gives you less knowledge of how direct x works. Buy some directx 7 books. The look on msdn.microsoft.com for DX9 tutorials.

2. I would learn C before C++. If you dont you may easily get classes and structures confused and also C obviously sets u up for C++.

3. I havent made any games, im just learning how to make interesting scenes. I am hoping that by just learning about meshes and stuff i will then be able to program more games more easily afterwards.

4. Dont start with a game. It may seem more exiting now but u will hit a dead end because of lack of experience.

regards ACE

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1. Assuming you have some experience with a/some programming language(s) (obviously not C++, from your post, but maybe something simpler)... well, I don''t see why you''d need a tutorial to "get started": programming a game is only slightly different from any other program. There''s absolutely no universal way to do so. There are, however, guidelines you can follow. And in one fell swoop, I''ll cover...

2. ...also. There was a sticky on creating a tetris clone in C++ here not too long ago. I''m not sure if you could find it, but if not try to look for something like "c++ tutorial tetris" on google; someone else hosted it elsewhere. You might be able to find it. If not, try your hand at something simpler before C++ to get a feel for programming. Then, just start learning the ropes and try basic stuff.

3. Hello World, an MMORPG that involves the words "Hello" and "World" being placed side-by-side. Sadly, only one player could play it and it wasn''t interactive, not did it feature online play. But hey, that''s pretty impressive for a first game, no?

4. Well, it doesn''t take as much experience as people make it out to sound like, but it does require a lot of determination. That''s why it''s best to tackle a number of smaller projects first, like arcade-style games (space invaders! That game rocked!!). When you''ll be fully comfortable with the language of your choice and know the concepts used in 3D well enough to write a couple of basic games, you can try moving on to a more demanding project. Just don''t aim too high.

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There is a "So You Want To Be A Game Programmer" guide here. (Amazon). Bear in mind that the objective of the guide is probably to sell you books (of course) but nevertheless it''s not a bad overview of what an aspiring game programmer would need to know.

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