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Sorry if this has been answered before, the search function isn''t working for me right now. I''ve been using the Borland C++ compiler to compile console games, and wanted to start making games in Windows. All the books that I''ve been reading on the subject use Visual C++, making it very hard for me to follow on some things (nearly all of the examples won''t compile in Borland). I''m a student with very little money, so I was wondering if it is worth it to buy Visual C++. Would there be any other benefits besides compatibility with my books? Any opinions would be appreciated. Doug

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Some may disagree with me, but I think its worth it. See if you can get the academic discount on it through your school. That might save you around 1000 dollars.

Visual C++ has a good IDE in my opinion, I really like intellisense etc. The compiler is also pretty good, 98% compliant (on 2003) last time I looked.

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C++ is C++ regardless of the compiler. I''m not gonna get into the debate of VC++ vs. whatever other programs there are out there, but you should be able to get code from the book to compile under borland (if it''s directX related stuff, that, admittedly, is difficult to get going under borland, but not impossible). What kind of errors does it give? You might not be setting up the include and library directories properly.

As mentioned, many schools will give you a significant discount on VC++, so that''s worth looking into as well.

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it might just be the UK, but try and see if your uni/college are part of the ''academic alliance'' with MS... if so, you can get the standard edition (I think!) for free! Granted, there''s no optimizing compiler and a few wizard-like things missing out... but essentially its the same compiler your books use, and for free

check it out.

regards
Jack

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quote:
Original post by jollyjeffers
see if your uni/college are part of the ''academic alliance'' with MS... if so, you can get the standard edition (I think!) for free! Granted, there''s no optimizing compiler and a few wizard-like things missing out...

You get the Academic edition through MSDNAA, which is the same as the Professional edition. Optimizers, wizards and everything.



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quote:
Original post by Chris Hare
Wrong. Certain compilers are more standards compliant than others. Look closely at the compiler''s features and compliance before you purchase.


blah blah blah.


While this is technically correct, both borland and VC++ have very high compliance and it''s hard for me to believe that the majority of sample code in a book is based on C++ features that VC++ has correct and borland has wrong.

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The majority of the code is based on DirectX. The one error code that I can''t figure out (From non-DirectX code) is:

error: Unresolved external "_main" referenced from C:\borland\bcc55\lib\c0x32.obj

This is a linker error btw. The borland error help files were very vague about this one.

I will look into VC++ through my school, thank you for all the responses.

Doug

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you have to compile using 'create win32 application flag' if you're using winMain instead of main. I believe it's -W, but it's been a while since i've used that so i could be wrong.

As far as DX, it is possible to work it in borland if you have the time and patience, but it's definately much easier in VC++.

[edited by - kdogg on March 26, 2004 7:24:31 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Berill

error: Unresolved external "_main" referenced from C:\borland\bcc55\lib\c0x32.obj

This is a linker error btw. The borland error help files were very vague about this one.




c0x32.obj is used for compiling win console apps. If you''re compiling normal win apps, which I believe DX needs, you should be linking with c0w32.obj instead. Normally, you don''t have to worry about this if you''re not invoking the ilinker separately; the compiler should invoke the linker automatically unless you say otherwise. You just need to worry about passing in the correct switches when compiling. Like kdogg suggested, you can use the -W switch to compile a normal windows app or -tW will work the same too.

Just post back here if you still have problems or you can also ask in the borland newsgroup.

Hope that helps





--{You fight like a dairy farmer!}

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