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ichiban_addict

3d tools

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What do most 3d applications use for there gui''s...MFC?? what would you guys recommend for making (a simple) one? I have heard of winforms and stuff like that, but mfc seems pretty cool actually. thanks

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Yeah, change is coming. Longhorn will be radically different to the Win32 programming we''re all used to. Learn MFC for the time being (it''s been sufficent for the past 10 years), but don''t get into it too deeply. Looks like we''ll all have to learn a lot over the next few years...


Windows 95 - 32 bit extensions and a graphical shell for a 16 bit patch
to an 8 bit operating system originally coded for a 4 bit microprocessor,
written by a 2 bit company that can''t stand 1 bit of competition.

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and the lucky ones are those never bothered with it ^_^

i would still stick to pure win32 coding... this won''t change that heavy.

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Most 3D applications, if you''re talking games/interactive, write their own GUIs using just plain bitmaps and mouse events.

Most 3D applications, if you''re talking modeling applications and CAD, probably use plain Win32, rather than MFC or Windows Forms.

You should pick whatever you''re comfortable with, although I''d recommend plain Win32 over MFC, and Windows Forms over any of those (if you''re OK with living in a Managed World (tm)).

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quote:
Original post by RPTD
i would still stick to pure win32 coding... this won't change that heavy.

According to what I've heard, Longhorn will be radically different to Win32. The way Microsoft see it, the Win32 API is now Windows' biggest weakness, and needs to be done away with. That's what Longhorn does. Look at .NET's Windows.Systems.Forms namespace. That's what it's gonna be like from now on. It's like when C++ superceded C as the language of choice for game programmers. There was a reason for that shift: C++ provided better modularity than C. There are reasons for the shift away from Win32. I don't have the details, but take a look here for the answers: http://longhorn.msdn.microsoft.com/portal_nav.htm.


Windows 95 - 32 bit extensions and a graphical shell for a 16 bit patch
to an 8 bit operating system originally coded for a 4 bit microprocessor,
written by a 2 bit company that can't stand 1 bit of competition.


[edited by - iNsAn1tY on March 29, 2004 6:03:52 PM]

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