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frogsinmyhair

Changes in C++ in the last 12 years

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I dusted off a book to learn C++ at the local library. 1992 doesn't seem that long ago, but the book gives examples of RAM as 640k. Its written for Turbo C++ but the code is the same, and it really doesn't mention that old DOS compiler much. Question is, what major changes (if any) happened to C++ since that book was published in 92. I have a modern book on programming games in c++ , but you need to know c++ before starting it, so I'm taking some mountain dew and crashing through the intro to c++ book (300 out of 700 pages the first afternoon not to mention all the chapter excercise). I know that direct3d/x, openGL, and ummm,well, 256 colors didn't exist back then, but anything structural/innovations I'll be missing out on? Floating point notation, variable types, new commands.... theres no mention of STL, but thats hit in my game programming book. Its my first programming language I've learned, but I did computer science two years back, so it all seems rather straight foreward and simple after having a test where we wrote only in machine code, and had to use it to alter L1 and L2 cache arrays Thanks, -Erik [edited by - frogsinmyhair on March 28, 2004 12:59:58 AM]

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The most recent C++ standard was published in 1998. Lots of stuff has changed, as I understand it. You''d be better off getting a newer book.

(MSVC still follows the older standards in at least one area. They just got around to fixing it in 2003... 5 years after the standard was published.. and the correct behavior is OPTIONAL, not the default! Absurd.)

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quote:
and the correct behavior is OPTIONAL, not the default!

False. VS .NET 2003 is standard compliant out-of-the-box. Even the older .h headers of the STL are not included.

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quote:
Original post by frogsinmyhair
VS.Net? I know about the C*.net''s, but never heard of that.

It''s just an IDE for C++ VB C# and other .NET languages. Nothing special

I don''t know how C++ was back in 1992, but the most bizzare change I have known is this:

int x = 0;
cout << x << " " << x++ << endl;

output:
1 0

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quote:
Original post by alnite
I don''t know how C++ was back in 1992, but the most bizzare change I have known is this:

int x = 0;
cout << x << " " << x++ << endl;

output:
1 0


That''s not a change. Nor is it staying the same. The order of evaluation in a statement like that is explicitly undefined. It''s completely up to the compiler to decide.


"Sneftel is correct, if rather vulgar." --Flarelocke

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