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What comes after MSVC++ 6?

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Hi, This is maybe a stupid question, but anyway: I am programming a desktop application for Windows in C++ under MSVC++ version 6. I know there is version 7 but that one is also quite old I think. If I want to be up-to-date, what should I buy? Is it .NET? But from what I read it is mainly meant for web-applications and needs a new programming language (C#). Is .NET a programming environment or just some name for applications with a specific interface? Thanks

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Microsoft Visual C++.net 2003 is the latest version.

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Thanks for your replies

So basically can I buy Microsoft Visual C++.net 2003 and continue working in the same way? (without changing to C# or having to use different Windows libraries). In short: will my application compile without modification under that new development environment?

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In my experience, anything that compiles in VC6 will compile in .NET. In fact, it will import your old project files and create the necessary .NET project files automatically.

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quote:
Original post by ZealousElixir
In my experience, anything that compiles in VC6 will compile in .NET. In fact, it will import your old project files and create the necessary .NET project files automatically.


In general this is true, however upgrading compilers is likely to have some hassles attached. Most of the time, C++ code written in VC6 will only fail to compile in VC.NET because the code is wrong (by wrong I mean not complying to the standard).

The code that was worst to upgrade were the modules which use lots of templates, one of the areas that VC6 was broken badly in. Most of the time it''s really obvious how to fix the errors, add a typename here and there and the problems go away.

VC7.1 is well worth the effort of upgrading

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Is it the case however, that the standalone versions of Visual C++ .Net do not come with the optimizing compiler? That, in order to use it, you need to get the enterprise edition of Visual Studio .Net . I know either the Windows Platform SDK or the .Net SDK ships with the standard version of the 7.0 compiler. I think I got the x86 version from the .Net SDK and the IA64 version from the Platform SDK. I've been wondering if I should switch to it instead of the optimizing compiler I got with Visual C++ 6.0 Pro. Guess I should benchmark it and see huh?

[edited by - Mastaba on March 29, 2004 10:01:12 PM]

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MFC & ALT both were updated, so if you use them, be careful - make a copy of your project first. We brought forward a couple of apps, and gave-up on one of them.

[edited by - Magmai Kai Holmlor on March 29, 2004 10:57:14 PM]

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You do not have to get the enterprise edition to get optimization abilities. You only need the professional edition. If you are a student, you can get the academic version for like $100. The academic version is the same as professional, with a few add ons for students. But the academic edition is the full professional edition with optimizations and all.

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My foresight suggests that MSVC++ 8 will come after MSVC++ 7 which itself succeeded MSVC++ 6. The mystery of this numerical pattern has been cracked.

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