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Programmers: what development tools do you use?

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Hello, I just wanted to get some feedback as to what tools YOU use when programming and WHY (compilers, debuggers etc.) I'm just curious what everyone uses around here (mainly when programming in C/C++). Also, what operating system you program on might help as well. To get the ball rolling, I have used... OS - Windows XP Compiler/debugger - Microsoft Visual Studio .NET -- Nice programming environment, loads of documentation, nice debugger etc. Compiler - Dev-C++ -- A good, simple programming environment (for me), easy to whip up code, can quickly compile small segments of code etc. Well, that's all I've used so far. :-) I'm particularly interested in the development tools for Linux and Unix because I've heard there are some pretty good ones... Anyway, feel free to post (please add a short statement as to why you use what if you don't mind); thanking you all in advance [edited by - NeonStorm on April 5, 2004 8:19:22 AM] [edited by - NeonStorm on April 5, 2004 8:21:05 AM] [edited by - NeonStorm on April 5, 2004 8:23:19 AM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
OS: Windows XP Home, because That''s Where The Money Is

Development environment: Python w/IDLE. Perl, used from EditPlus. A handful of other interpreted languages, used from their native environments. Delphi for writing DLLs accessible from other languages. Why? Because life is too short to waste on C/C++. Computers are damn fast these days (they were damn fast five years ago, and now they''re 10-15x as damn fast!). My rule is to whatever make development totally pleasant and addictive, and everything else falls out of that.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
OS: Windows / Linux
Compiler: GCC
Editor: Notepad / VI

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OS: Linux for server-side stuff
Compiler: GCC
Editor: Xemacs

OS: Windows for client-side stuff
Compiler: VC++ 6.0
Editor: VC++ 6.0
API: DirectX (sometimes I have to use OpenGL when interfacing with openGL stuff)

I also mix it up with some assembly when needed, but as far as scripting languages go, I like to make my own tools with C++ or maybe Java... (call me a control freak).

When adjusting 2D stuff I use Photoshop.
When adjusting 3D stuff I use 3DSMax or sometimes just AC3D.

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For my primary development machine:

OS: Mac OS X 10.3.3
Compiler: gcc -v
Reading specs from /usr/libexec/gcc/darwin/ppc/3.3/specs
Thread model: posix
gcc version 3.3 20030304 (Apple Computer, Inc. build 1495)
javac version 1.4.2-34, for when I work in Java.
IDE: Xcode 1.1
API:
Java: standard Java API, including JFC/Swing
C++: C++ STL(don''t make GUI C++ programs on Mac, yet)
Objective-C: Cocoa

For my PC:
OS: Windows 2000 Professional
IDE: Borland C++ Builder 6 Professional
API: Borland VCL with C++ STL

Yea, being stuck between platforms is interesting, and fun in a way that I never run out of things to learn. Although I somewhat cheat, and build my programs with visual editors when I can get away with it.

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Visual Studio .NET 2003 for compiling/debugging
EditPlus for most interpreted languages, with Python 2.3 being my preferred language at the moment. For GUI, I switch between Win32 and WTL a lot. For quick and dirty GUI stuff, it''s usually a toss up between C# and wxPython


daerid | Legends | Garage Games | Spirit | Hapy | Boost | Python | Google
"Doomed to crumble, unless we grow, and strengthen our communication" - Maynard James Keenan, Tool

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Havent seen any of you guys mention C++ BuilderX. It is a new IDE from Borland and very different from the previous versions. It is based on JBuilder, written in Java and is cross platform compatible. I downloaded it a few days ago (one of the editions is free!) and have used it for OpenGL programs. You could get the DirectX9 compatible Libs on the net for DirectX Development. You could also use the Cygwin and MinGW toolset from within the IDE. Also check out CDT from Eclipse.

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For Win2k, it''s offically:

Textpad for Web development
Dev-C++ for Code development
GCC/Cygwin for quick command-line stuff
The GIMP for Image manipulation
Audacity for Audio manipulation
Doxygen for Code/Library documentation
Perforce for Configuration Management

But unofficially...I wish I had legal copies of:

Microsoft Visual Studio .NET
Adobe Photoshop

Regards,
Jeff


[ CodeDread ]

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J2ME game development:
- Editor / IDE : Eclipse (also vi or kate sometimes for editing non-java code)
- Build tools: Ant, some shell scripts (only simple ones)
- Misc data migration: Perl scripts to do easy data migration; C++ programs to manipulate big complex binary data (currently a 28k word dictionary being compressed into a custom efficient binary format); occasionally custom Java programs to do data migration
- Graphics design: Gimp mostly, Pov-ray occasionally (other things very occasionally)
- Graphics conversion: Imagemagick, pngcrush
- J2ME emulators:
- Sun Emulator (WTK1.0
- Microemulator
- SonyEricsson emulator (occasionally)
- Misc tools:
- retroguard Java jar obfuscator
- preverifier from Sun WTK1.0
- info-zip as a better jar packer

OS: Linux mostly, Windows sometimes. (All of above run on Linux except for SonyE emulator which is Windows-only; some are Linux-specific but most run on both)

---

C++ game development

In my recent (strictly amateur) C++ games I''ve mostly used kate as an editor and built stuff with Makefiles (kate under Linux, the Makefiles under Linux or from Ming/W for Windows). I''ve used many of the above for C++ games also, plus Allegro games library, some Allegro-based tools (grabber, datafile maker). I also used a rather dodgy SVG editor "Sodipodi" to create 2d vectored levels for a recent game. I''ve experimented with some success with various other vector editors (Kontour for 2d). Kludge3d for 3d work (which is very kludgy)

My 2d games tended to use software rendering (with some hardware acceleration in some circumstances) with Allegro.

For 3d stuff I''ve been using OpenGL and SDL (but I haven''t got very far with any 3d projects).

Generally I try to make tools I know do as much as possible, only trying to learn new ones if it really seems necessary. Some things I''m not currently very good at with any of my existing tools (3d modelling I have no decent results with; but I have rendered models in game test programs). Textures (for 2d or 3d games) also aren''t my strong point.

I''m planning soon to code some 2d (gameplay-wise) games that use OpenGL for hardware acceleration, that provides a pretty mean combination in most cases

Mark

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quote:
Original post by KrisKo
Havent seen any of you guys mention C++ BuilderX. It is a new IDE from Borland and very different from the previous versions. It is based on JBuilder, written in Java and is cross platform compatible. I downloaded it a few days ago (one of the editions is free!) and have used it for OpenGL programs. You could get the DirectX9 compatible Libs on the net for DirectX Development. You could also use the Cygwin and MinGW toolset from within the IDE. Also check out CDT from Eclipse.


I tried C++ BuilderX, and was somewhat disappointed that it wasn''t RAD, since that is the only reason I use Builder for Windows development, I decided to stay with BCB 6. Although the new JBuilder for OS X is fairly cool, I still prefer Xcode for the simple reason that I use it for C++ and Objective-C as well.

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OS: Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition
IDE: Visual Studio .NET 2002 and 2003, Eclipse
Text editor: SciTE, gvim
Build: NAnt
Test: NUnit, Draco.NET
Source control: Subversion, AnkhSVN, (CVS)
Email: Outlook
Diagramming, UML: Visio, Enterprise Architect
SSH: PuTTY
RSS: RSS Bandit


--
AnkhSVN - A Visual Studio .NET Addin for the Subversion version control system.
[Project site] [Blog] [RSS] [Browse the source] [IRC channel]

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OS: Windows 2000/XP
IDE: Visual Studio .NET 2003, Eclipse, Codewarrior for ARM
Text editor: SC Unipad and Editplus
Diagnostics: VTune, DevPartner
Source control: ClearCase (:/)
Diagramming: Visio, Enterprise Architect

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OS:WindowsServer2003, Enterprise Edition Build 3790
IDE: Borland C++ BuilderX
or Borland commandline compiler,notepad, and turbo debugger (seriously)

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