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Why switch to DirectX9 ?

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Hey @ll, if I would ask you why a guy (who knows OpenGL pretty good) should switch to DirectX9, what would you answer ? Bye, Leoric

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well, theres no all encompassing reason. From what i hear (i only know some directX) DirectX and OpenGL are pretty equal. But some reasons would be if you wanted to work on a project using DirectX, or if you liked C# and microsoft alot.

Overall as long as you like OpenGL and are relatively proficent at it i see no good reason to change.

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If you join a team that''s working on a DirectX 9 based game, you''d have a pretty good reason.

I personally strongly prefer Direct3D to OpenGL, but there''s absolutely no reason to switch to another if you''re already proficient in one. They do the same thing, after all.

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It depends on your needs, what kind of work you''re going to be doing, and who the end customer is.

Both API''s are just ways to access the same underlying hardware. Both expose roughly the same functionality. One may do so in a more straight-forward fashion than the other, but in the end, the results will be the same.

neneboricua

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I'', an ex-OpenGL programmer. I worked with OpenGL for about a year or so so I wasnt a ''John Carmack'' But I''ll tell you my personal reasons why I changed from API.

What I really lik about DirectX is that you have once company that develops the API, with OpenGL you have the ARB which slows things down. DirectX is one massive superb documented API with some nice samples and tutorials. Also if you want to have the latest tech then you need to download 3rd party hearders to make use of it (like shaders and multi-texturing) and also ATI and nVidia have there own OpenGL calls.

Well this is just my 2 cents. If I said something that is not correct then please tell, I dont want to spread any falls info

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quote:
Original post by twix
I personally strongly prefer Direct3D to OpenGL, but there''s absolutely no reason to switch to another if you''re already proficient in one. They do the same thing, after all.

I agree with the guy completely. Except that I prefer OpenGL.

Er oh, and I don''t like Microsoft. So I guess I don''t really agree with him....

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If nothing else, knowing both APIs could potentially be helpful in the future for getting a job or something. I only know DirectX, but whenever I feel like I have enough time, I hope to learn OpenGL as well. My employer has asked me a few times what it would take to move my stuff from Windows to Linux. Unfortunately, I have to tell him quite a bit, due to my lack of proficiency with Linux, and my utter lack of knowledge concerning OpenGL (and other libraries for things such as video playing and such). It''d probably look a lot nicer if I could offer employers options, as opposed to, "I can do it in DirectX, but that''s all."

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Just on a side note, supporting Linux is ridiculous.
Blizzard can easily make their games run on linux because they support DirectX and OpenGL (since their games also run on MAC), but they never release Linux versions of their game because there isn''t a big enough user base to warrent supporting them.

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quote:
Original post by Unsuspected
Just on a side note, supporting Linux is ridiculous.
Blizzard can easily make their games run on linux because they support DirectX and OpenGL (since their games also run on MAC), but they never release Linux versions of their game because there isn''t a big enough user base to warrent supporting them.


Oh, if Blizzard doesn''t support Linux I suppose there''s no reason for anyone else to, then...

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It''s not that it''s difficult for Blizzard or any other company to make a Linux version. It''s just more cost effective to not have a Linux version of the game because of projected sales.

So we don''t go off topic, from what I''ve seen each one has pros and cons. There isn''t really anything that makes one vastly better than the other. If you already know OGL, a little DX9 knowledge couldn''t hurt. Many engines use both and knowing a lot about one and a fair amount about the other one will probably make you look "more valuable to the team" when looking for jobs.

Or maybe I''m just saying things...

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quote:
Original post by Leoric
Hey @ll,

if I would ask you why a guy (who knows OpenGL pretty good) should switch to DirectX9, what would you answer ?

Bye,
Leoric


The reasons may be many:
Managed DirectX
HLSL shader compiler
D3DX math -- highly optimized toward 32-bit CPUs
D3DX texture and mesh loading libs for tools
Other fun D3DX stuff

There are likely equivalents for OGL, but probably scattered tot he four corners of the web and maybe not as optimized. Also, no extensions sorcery needs to be done to use the latest tech.

I like pie.

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quote:
Original post by Unsuspected
Just on a side note, supporting Linux is ridiculous.
Blizzard can easily make their games run on linux because they support DirectX and OpenGL (since their games also run on MAC), but they never release Linux versions of their game because there isn''t a big enough user base to warrent supporting them.


In general, outside the Lounge, changing the subject so sharply is quite unwarranted. Please don''t go there.


There are 2 good reasons to learn Direct3D:
1) You have some actual reason to learn it
2) You''re like most of the rest of us--i.e. a young amateur with a passion for learning and nothing better to do.

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I know both. I prefer DirectX. Why? No real reason. I just do. I originally moved for the unified shader support, but now that glSlang is taking hold it''s not really an issue. I find that DirectX forces me to keep my code structure more defined. With OpenGL I could place hacks all over the place and I just confused myself.

It''s your choice.

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Hi,

some of your statements are quite funny to read. Personally, I made the decision to dig into DirectX. Today was my first day with Direct3D9. Setting up that beast is as much work as writing a simple game with OpenGL (ok, a very simple game :-P )

But, with all that nice helper functions it shall be a pleasure in the end. I''m pretty sure it will soon pay making the step towards DX. I liked DD very much a few years ago.

Oh, and one thing is right: I have never ever seen anything better commented than the DX-SDK. Awesome.

Bye guys,
Leoric

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I initially tried using Direct3D back in the DirectX 3 days (the first incarnation of Direct3D). I had no experience working in 3D and needless to say it didn't go well. I tried OpenGL and had a lot more success with it. OpenGL is a MUCH better API to learn the basics with than D3D. After using OpenGL for a few years in my spare time I decided to try Direct3D again since I had heard that the API had matured and I had some experience. Now I use Direct3D exclusively.

I think Direct3D has quite a few advantages over OpenGL (provided you're developing exclusively for a windows platform). The Direct3D documentation is beautiful. I loved my OpenGL Red Book, but the help file distributed with the DirectX SDK is sensational. Another big plus, IMO, is the Direct3D debug output. If you're running Direct3D in debug mode you can have it print warnings and errors to the debug output. It'll even offer performance suggestions and tell you of any unallocated resources when you release the device. The D3DX library and native support for the .X file format are also extremely compelling reasons to use Direct3D for people looking to get something up and running quickly. Also, if you're in the gaming industry (or are looking to get into it) you're much more likely to work on a project that uses Direct3D than OpenGL.

[edited by - Dodzilla on April 14, 2004 3:26:09 AM]

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