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is C# the future for game developers too?

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before you answer with a HELL NO, let me just say a few things. Please dont think i am raised this question to stand on my soapbox and shout at you about the awesomeness of .NET and all that is microsoft. I will admit that i do like .NET, because its a great tool for developing applications, and i just am wondering if it is/could be used for game development as well. I am not a game developer. The farthest i have gone was tinkering around with the half-life engine. I dont know how to program in direct x, or managed direct x for that matter. so i really dont know what i am talking about. anywho, after stumbling upon this forum i must say it raised my curiosity about how the whole .net mumbojumbo could be applied to game development, and a few questions/scenarios began running through my head. So these "what ifs" are meant to answer my stupid questions, nothing more. 1. It seems to me that game development is going the way of dx. With each new release it appears to be gaining popularity over opengl, both with developers and graphics card makers. So a few releases of dx on down the line, ms, wanting to solidify .NET as the platform that all developers should use, drops "unmanaged" dircectx, and hence further directx uses native code. 2. VM allowed java to be used on any platform with the same code, running on a plethora of processors. Is a VM for the GPU that unreasonable? Whereby each GPU has a different VM that would garbage collect and all that jazz on the graphics card''s memory, and, say, manage the directx extensions on the card so the developers dont have to program for each different version of directx. Is that even a problem? 3. I cant think of a more practical use of events than a computer game. Performance issues aside for a second, i think the added bonus of simplifying game development and design would be enough to use it, even does cause a small slowdown in performance. I know raising an event is much slower than calling a function, but from what i remember about tinkering with the halflife stuff a few years back, there were alot of function call by different classes to check their state. So if there are 10 objects each calling a function every few ms, would the cost of a slow event be more than made up by the unnecessary function calls? 4. Performance is everything in an engine. But nowadays a computer game takes three years to develop, and by that time the engine cant utilize current advances. If a game engine could sacrifice performance in terms of efficiency for easier development, could that engine gain back the performance lost by utilizing current technology. What i mean is, if a game engine took one year instead of three, would it in fact be better performing because it could use the newest advances, instead of the advances made 3 years ago. just a few thoughts.....

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This post is flame bait.

Perhaps PC game developement MIGHT be headed that way, but consoles make up a larger part of the overall game market. I can''t ever see Sony or Nintendo locking themselves in to a Microsoft tool set for their development. I know C# has been standardized, but its still MS''s baby.

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quote:
Original post by yspotua
This post is flame bait.

Perhaps PC game developement MIGHT be headed that way, but consoles make up a larger part of the overall game market. I can't ever see Sony or Nintendo locking themselves in to a Microsoft tool set for their development. I know C# has been standardized, but its still MS's baby.


Like C and C++ are AT&T's babies? Like Java is Sun's baby? C# the language is an open standard, if Nintendo or Sony see it fitting well to develop games, they just need to write themselves a compiler (or port Mono).

With that said, I sincerly hope that they consider things like O'Caml to develop, that would rock.

[edited by - GnuVince on April 13, 2004 11:26:29 AM]

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Althought this probably isn''t what you want.... DotGNU supports the Playstation 2(although I bleieve it requires linux)
http://www.gnu.org/projects/dotgnu/

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quote:
Original post by GnuVince
Like C and C++ are AT&T''s babies? Like Java is Sun''s baby? C# the language is an open standard, if Nintendo or Sony see it fitting well to develop games, they just need to write themselves a compiler (or port Mono).

With that said, I sincerly hope that they consider things like O''Caml to develop, that would rock.

Microsoft has a (free) O''Caml compiler for .NET, so just porting Mono would be enough to get access to it :D

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quote:
Original post by ggs
quote:
Original post by GnuVince
Like C and C++ are AT&T''s babies? Like Java is Sun''s baby? C# the language is an open standard, if Nintendo or Sony see it fitting well to develop games, they just need to write themselves a compiler (or port Mono).

With that said, I sincerly hope that they consider things like O''Caml to develop, that would rock.

Microsoft has a (free) O''Caml compiler for .NET, so just porting Mono would be enough to get access to it :D



F# misses many O''Caml features, and also the development of F# seems to have stalled.

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