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Grain

Really Real Water.

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What''s the best way to represent water? I want to completely model the physics involved, not just simple waves on there surface and stuff, (although it should do that too). I want it to be ‘scoop-able’ and ‘pour-able’. It should maintain a constant volume, those volumes should be ‘split-able’ into smaller volumes and small volumes joined in to larger ones. It should take the shape of its container, unless it’s poured onto a flat surface in which case it should form puddles. It should be able to flow through pipes and over surfaces. I was thinking of using a particle system, in which each particle represents a discreet volume of water, like a droplet. The partials could be attracted by cohesion when very close to each other. If each particle had a list of adjacent particles it could work. What do you think? Do you have any ideas how to implement the particle system? Is there another way other than particles?

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I think that I''m leaning towards the particle system. Physics including surface tension / cohesion / pressure / gravity could easily (relatively, of course) be represented by "particles." I don''t know how much I would consider them particles as I would consider them control points for the water.. heh

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Do a search on "metaballs". Combined with a physics model it could be used for small scale water simulations. It''s been a long while since I''ve looked into them, but I do remember seeing a demo about 2 years ago featuring water droplets on a glass slide which worked pretty good.

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quote:
Original post by Cibressus
a pressure model would probably be the best way.

Tell me more.

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The best method for doing this is called Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). This has been the leading method in many fields for modelling fluids and fluid-like systems. However, be warned... while the results are very good, the amount of effort required to implement it is considerable. Consider it a very advanced project. For example, studying surface tension using SPH was a whole PhD for a friend of mine!

Cheers,

Timkin

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You might find this interesting:

http://www.flipcode.com/cgi-bin/msg.cgi?showThread=04-01-2004&forum=iotd&id=-1

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
You might find this interesting:

http://www.flipcode.com/cgi-bin/msg.cgi?showThread=04-01-2004&forum=iotd&id=-1

That not really water, more like an amorphous solid.

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