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QT worth anything to Game Developers?

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I''ve been hearing and seeing a lot about QT of late, and I''m curious if its of any worth to game developers. For those who don''t know, QT is an open source, C++ GUI application framework from Trolltech. As I understand it, the code is completely platform-independent, but the applications are compiled and run natively. It does look like its more geared toward traditional, windowed GUI apps, but I thought I''d ask anyway.

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QT is pretty cool, but as it is functionally impossible to render to an abstract device (such as an OpenGL context or Direct3D device surface) without jumping through hoops and monumental slowdown, I''d have to say that it has no relevance to the actual game.

It could be useful for tools development, if it weren''t completely eclipsed by the proliferation of MFC in past years and the current ease and flexibility of Windows Forms (Gtk# for Mono users).

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That''s about what I figured.

Side note: I assume that your comment about jumping through hoops to use an OpenGL context does take the QT OpenGL library into account?

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Qt is excellent in every respect except that it costs a lot of money. I''d look at wxWindows, which seems to be only slightly less nice and doesn''t cost money. I thought Qt had a way to make an OpenGL context but a MODERATOR said it''s hard so who knows. I know that wxWindows does.

Still, they''re both more useful for tools than for games.

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QT does cost a fair bit
They have a library for OGl.
Its possible to use DirectX/3d also.
http://lists.trolltech.com/qt-interest/2003-03/thread01272-0.html

Paul.

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quote:
Original post by bobstevens
Qt is excellent in every respect except that it costs a lot of money.
Actually, there is an Open Source distribution available under the GPL. Of course, this means that you can only use it for Open Source products. Also, it appears that it''s only available for Linux platforms.

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I expect QT is of use to game developers but only for tools and/or setup programs, not for actual in-game GUIs, which tend to have rather different requirements. It makes windowed-mode overlapping windows style of a GUI, which is not what''s used in most games.

Mark

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quote:
Original post by irbrian
Actually, there is an Open Source distribution available under the GPL. Of course, this means that you can only use it for Open Source products. Also, it appears that it''s only available for Linux platforms.


I''m aware of this, but using it under the GPL is not desirable or feasible in many cases. And they don''t let you switch licenses in the middle of a project.

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quote:
Original post by irbrian
quote:
Original post by bobstevens
Qt is excellent in every respect except that it costs a lot of money.
Actually, there is an Open Source distribution available under the GPL. Of course, this means that you can only use it for Open Source products. Also, it appears that it''s only available for Linux platforms.


It can (and has) been used for close source. If I somehow missed something making it so it can''t be, it''s sure broken a lot

I''m sure I''ve seen more than just Linux versions...

A bit more on topic... QT might be nice for GUIs once you get used to it, but after having been through the QT embedded source code a few times, I highly doubt you''d want it for anything ingame

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quote:
Original post by Drakonite
It can (and has) been used for close source. If I somehow missed something making it so it can''t be, it''s sure broken a lot

I''m sure I''ve seen more than just Linux versions...
I believe they also have a Mac version of the GPL distro, and maybe some others -- I didn''t see a Win32 GPL version. Anyway, the main product (including the Win32 distro) is Closed Source and VERY expensive.
quote:
A bit more on topic... QT might be nice for GUIs once you get used to it, but after having been through the QT embedded source code a few times, I highly doubt you''d want it for anything ingame
Yup, that seems to be the consensus. My question''s answered. Thanks all.

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Your question was not answered because no one mentioned the fact that Qt provides a platform independent interface to threading, networking, and file systems. These are very useful since games are not all graphics and only graphics.

Further, it does provide an interface to openGL and you do not have to jump through hoops in more recent versions (i.e. two years ago).

The product is open source but you need to pay for a commercial lisence. If you are making a commercial product, Qt is favourable to wxWindows because someone is accountable for the library. When you pay for the lisence you get the source files and can edit them to your heart's content. You do not need to release the source for your programs that you have written using the commercial lisence.


FURTHER, MFC is not worth mentioning in the same light as Qt or Windowforms. MFC is locked to a single platform, requires an obscene amount of script written code amongst your own code, and to be honest, I don't know anyone who has come away from MFC without the look of someone who has just witnessed a train wreck.

Windowforms is locked to the .Net (mono, dotGnu, etc) platform. It might be ok if you don't mind vendor lockin to Microsoft or to have no one accountable for your libraries. It isn't ok if you want a nimble third party organisation (.Net version 2 is three years in the making; Qt has gone from 2.x to 3.3.1 in that time -I believe Qt4 is coming out q3 this year) to help you out without costing you your firstborn child (Microsoft Developer Support is not inexpensive).

[edited by - flangazor on April 16, 2004 3:19:30 AM]

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