• Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

The time it takes to build a FPS

This topic is 5027 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Yes yes, from the topic you can see i''m a scrub that doesn''t know anything about making a game. This is my situation: I''m in a game programming class and the team i''m assigned to is 4 other people that have also never designed a game. Not only that, 3 of them seem completely unmotivated and probably would prefer to not program. The other one, the guy calling the shots atm, is this overly ambitious person who has wanted to design his game idea since before he entered college. He wants it to be a FPS where you are inside a mech. He believes we will be able to design a feature in it where you can get out of the mech and play as the human inside. Something he''s sure he wants to do is build the game engine from the bottom up. Now, on top of everying else, we have only 8 weeks to do this. Now i consider myself to be pretty realistic. I don''t think this is a good idea at all. I think we won''t be able to get much of it done and probably won''t have anything to show the teacher at the 8th week. Does anyone disagree? So i would like to make the case to the rest of my group, who is unmotivated, that this guys idea will probably lead to failure to all of them and convince them to attempt another idea instead (namely mine). But i would like my argument to be based on factual information, so what i need is a list of techniques that a FPS like this would need to use along with an estimated time of how long each one should take to code and debug. Please keep in mind at all times that this is everyone''s first game and there will probably be only be 2 people doing most of the programming. Here''s a couple of examples: Collision detection with walls/obsticles: 3 days Collision detection with weapons: 3 days Designing a level editor to make levels: 2 weeks Using Frustum Culling: 1 week ...... PS: If you have any other suggestions for my situation, they would be greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
sorry I can't even begein to answer this, it takes me at least 2 - 3 weeks to learn a single function/process thing, to a point where I'm "sort of" happy with it. Each one of those things you mentioned has hundreds of functions/processes (not quite hundreds, but lots any way).
If you worked really hard you could probably get a 2d background image up with your player running about picking things up or something, but do you guys even know any programming language yet? You are right your freind doesn't have much of a clue

[edited by - Stevieboy on April 16, 2004 6:33:19 PM]

[edited by - Stevieboy on April 16, 2004 6:34:25 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 weeks? A FPS? Even if you''re a highly experienced programmer, this is nearly impossible if you''re planning to build your engine from ground up!

I think I do not have to provide a more detailled insight. Just a recommendation: forget about it, try something simple instead.



Indeterminatus

--si tacuisses, philosophus mansisses--

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It sounds a bit too optimistic yes..

Questions:
What language are you making it in? Prior experience in the language? How many levels is the game supposed to be? Single player + AI or network? What APIs/ toolkits can you use? What have other teams made in the past, what are the other teams in your class making? I don''t know what level your class is.. If other''s are making pacman or tetris clones, why should you make a (possibly non-working) FPS?

Tips:
1. scrap the level designer plan. Get a Q3 BSP editor or something. An additional bonus is the readily availability of info on how to get it into the game.
2. Make it simple. A "dual" game with both mech combat and outside the mech doesn''t seem simple. Choose one. You can make the player model look like a mech, or like a human.

A game is just as good as it''s content. You need decent models, textures, levels, particle effects, music, sound effetcs. Possibly shaders, story, AI.

If the guy calling the shot''s have wanted to design this since before he entered college, did he really plan on making it only 8 weeks? Can''t he wait until this grade-hinging project is finished?

No clickies because it''s *your* assignment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The short answer would be "ROFL!!"

This, of course, is of no help.

The somewhat longer answer would be something more along the lines of... wow. Someone is WAY over-ambitious. In 8 weeks' time, building an engine from the ground up, getting media for your game (even if you rip it from an other game), designing levels (even if it's just a test level), and coding the game AI, is practically impossible. Unless your name happens to be Carmak, possibly.

Tell the guy calling the shots, plain and simple, that this is impossible. It's not impossible, but it might as well be. Pick a smaller project, possibly something 2D. Setting up a 2D engine with, say, SDL, is pretty easy. You could probably get a decent platformer up and running in 8 weeks' time if you're willing to put effort into it. With a willing and able team, you might even be able to have something somewhat impressive if you really put your heart into it.

The important part is getting your project to work and to have the bare minimum first. You'll probably be able to do this in 4-6 weeks' time. Then comes the debugging and the actual meat and flesh. Take advice from someone who's done the same kind of project (only, solo, as there weren't enough of us in the class to make groups): do NOT work on unecessary features until your game engine works. That's the most important piece of advice anyone can give you. You want something that works. Purdy flashes and cool moves can be added afterwards.

Good luck; just remember that nothing's preventing you or your team from working on that FPS after this project's done. Just don't stake your grades on something that you most likely will only be able to do after many, many sleepless nights of hardcore work (if at all).

Edit: Wait, never designed a game? Ok, forget this idea completely. Please. Start by writing something boring yet simple, like a Tetris clone. See how long it takes your team to understand the basics of a simple graphics API, handling player input, etc.. Then think back to your FPS. You'll be glad you changed your mind. Plus, you'll have time to improve on your project afterwards, so it won't be bad or anything in the end.

[edited by - RuneLancer on April 16, 2004 7:15:30 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by frostburn

Questions:
What language are you making it in? Prior experience in the language? How many levels is the game supposed to be? Single player + AI or network? What APIs/ toolkits can you use? What have other teams made in the past, what are the other teams in your class making? I don't know what level your class is.. If other's are making pacman or tetris clones, why should you make a (possibly non-working) FPS?



We plan to make it in C++, we all have prior OpenGL experience but i really believe mine is better than most of them. This optimistic guy claims to have made his own raytracer, but then i looked at some code he showed me that he was implying used some techniques for this FPS and all it was was a fucking pyramid floating around in mid air surrounded by walls: Basically the "hello world" of OpenGL. I asked to see the raytracer and he refused to show it to me, i don't think he actually made one

He innitially suggested it's going ot have all these modes of play like capture the flag, destroy the enemies base, multiplayer with teams, and all that crap. Then i said we should just try to make it single player with a couple of AI on totally flat ground and with no ability to get out of the mech. So he agreed, but i think the guy actually thinks maybe by week 6 we'll have done enough to add some of those features!

We will be using OpenGL and GLUT. I suggested SDL and he's like, "We have no time!" I also suggested using CVS as opposed to his idea of putting the code on his website and he also acted like, "We have no time!" until i really tried to get him to do this. Because i was planning on making the level editor (which i may not plan now thanks to valid advice in this thread) I was expecting to use WTL (sp?) to make the user interface but probably will not have to worry about that now.

The level of the class is: Almost everyone has taken a graphics theory class. Each person knows lighting and how to create objects and stuff and at the end of this graphics theory class everyone had to work on a little mini-project like "make a particle engine" or "make shadows" or "make a ball bounce around a box", etc. I know that one other group was planning on making a RTS, but unlike this guy in my class, they actually understand how much work they will end up putting into it. Another group was going to make a little Mario Party Clone: where they make a bunch of really crappy games that are easy to make and put them together in one game. I think everyone in the class is a little more ambitious than tetris and pacman.



[edited by - tieTYT on April 16, 2004 7:27:34 PM]

[edited by - tieTYT on April 16, 2004 7:46:06 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It totally depends on the features and stuff you want. I mad a mostly complete FPS in a couple days...but it was a Doom style raycaster with no AI, menus, or multiple levels. I also started a small FPS engine in Direct3D in about a week, but all I made was the level rendering and collision detection. However, you''re friend has much higher goals and it''ll take you a lot longer. You just need to be realistic in what you try based on your experience. There''s no way you can make a complete Mech Warrior style game, but a simple FPS is probably with your grasp if you''re reasonably proficient with OpenGL and your tools. However, if you want a really polished project, you need to go a lot simpler.

tj963

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
After one graphics course you guys plan on making an FPS? Ambitious...

I hope you all code really well. Writing a game by yourself can be done, but as soon as you have multiple developers, issues will undoubtedly arise. Communication is key, and when you''re referring to yourself as being "far and beyond" in terms of skill, I already foresee problems.

One piece of advice, to be great you ought be humble...

Other than that, if you guys are organized, motivated and set on ____finishing____ this, I''m sure you''ll get something done. How much it deviates from your initial design (I hope you actually have one) is dependant on time constraints and of course your abilities.

However, if you''re arguing and trying to convince people to use a source repository, well then... you seriously have other issues to worry about before you can start coding. ie. are the people you''re working with capable?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Please people, i''m begging someone, please make a little list like the example in my original post I know it seems unnecessary, i know it seems like it should be obvious and everyone would see the error of this idea, but I already told him this crap is impossible before i even asked for advice. His response is, "What are you, afraid to succeed?" This guy SIMPLY doesn''t get it and the rest of my group just isn''t motiviated enough to reject his idea because he''s making all these false promises to them. I really need a way to make it clear to everyone in my group that if they follow this guy, they will fail. That''s the only way i can make them take a side. I need to make them understand how enormous of an undertaking this is by giving them a list of the techniques that would be involved if they decided to go with it. Otherwise, he''ll just counter my argument with, "All we need to do is build the engine and once that''s done it should be easy!" or something like that.

Thank you for your help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Bashar

However, if you''re arguing and trying to convince people to use a source repository, well then... you seriously have other issues to worry about before you can start coding. ie. are the people you''re working with capable?


I"m not sure, i don''t know them. But the guy that''s causing these problems is suggesting that it would just be me and him coding the majority of this thing. I like the rest of the group though. As for my cocky attitude, it''s a result of this guy asking for the impossible out of me and acting like this is an issue of being afraid to do such a project, not my true personality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by tj963
It totally depends on the features and stuff you want. I mad a mostly complete FPS in a couple days...but it was a Doom style raycaster with no AI, menus, or multiple levels.


Did it have an engine built from the bottom up?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
just FYI, it takes even the most experienced programmer at least 1 year to make an engine "from the ground up". there's a TON involved just on the programming side:

graphics pipeline
physics (including collision detection & handling)
ai
weapons system
camera system
model file format creation / loading
level file format creation / loading
dynamic lighting
static lighting
animation system

and that's only on the programming side. I mean, i work on a team of 100+ people, we've been going for about 8 months non-stop and we haven't even completely finished our engine yet. and that was with a fully functioning engine to begin with that we're just modifying. granted it's a big title, but maybe that will give you a sense of scale for what you're talking about.

so, yeah, no way in hell can you make an engine from the ground up AND design the game AND get all the art assets for an FPS. unless maybe by FPS you mean "each character is represented by a single triangle and you can kill other differently colored triangles by shooting yet more differently colored triangles at them". THAT you can get up and running in 8 weeks no problem.

-me

[edited by - Palidine on April 16, 2004 8:07:17 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by RuneLancer
Why not switch groups? End of problem.


that''s an option i''m looking into. But it''s hard because i don''t have a way to contact the other groups right now and these groups are starting to be set in stone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i hate to sound pessimistic, but the project is doomed. I wouldn''t even bother making a list of items. If it takes a team of at least 20-30 people (not even including play testers, of which there may be hundreds) 2-3 years to get a even a crappy game on the market, i''d be surprised if you guys could put together even a good mockup in 8 weeks. I really mean no offense, that''s just reality. You''ll run into problems you''d never even imagine at every step and half-step (and baby-quarter-step) of the way. If you plan on 8 weeks, it will take 8 months (another sort of software development reality).

If it''s a game-design class, i''d try to develop a game with a very basic gameplay and build that (games like Tetris come to mind, but i''m not saying you should make Tetris again). That *is* a realistic goal.

If it''s just a graphics class, try programming a "demo". That can be fun and creative AND doable in 8 weeks.

While i admire the ambition of this kind of project (i have my own after all), 8 weeks is hardly enough to flesh out a design.

Remember... KISS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by tieTYT
that''s an option i''m looking into. But it''s hard because i don''t have a way to contact the other groups right now and these groups are starting to be set in stone.
Don''t you have a teacher/supervisor? Talk to him. Tell him you have a moron who''s dictating the direction of your team, and you either want a Teacher Edict or a new group.

Be pro-active. It''s your education.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by leiavoia
i hate to sound pessimistic, but the project is doomed. I wouldn't even bother making a list of items. If it takes a team of at least 20-30 people (not even including play testers, of which there may be hundreds) 2-3 years to get a even a crappy game on the market, i'd be surprised if you guys could put together even a good mockup in 8 weeks. I really mean no offense, that's just reality. You'll run into problems you'd never even imagine at every step and half-step (and baby-quarter-step) of the way. If you plan on 8 weeks, it will take 8 months (another sort of software development reality).



I"m not offended, this is what i wanted to hear. This is totally my opinion of the whole situation.

Oluseyi: Yes. I've already emailed the teacher and he said that the teams are not set in stone yet but the concrete is setting. I also just emailed him asking for contact information of other groups.

[edited by - tieTYT on April 17, 2004 3:00:59 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
asif you can''t just tell him to go get stuffed, and tell your other teammates whats really going to happen. Kick him out if u have to.

Thats just a joke, 8weeks to make a game where you not only have a mech, but also a person within it.

you are going to come up with all sorts of problems you couldnt even begin to to think of. They only appear as you make them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
First piece of advice:
Try to change teams if possible. Development teams where the dominant member is over-ambitious, impractical, and lacking in common sense are more likely to fail. I''m guessing that the final team grade will be merely based on what the team produces, it wont be based on the adversity you have to overcome working with difficult team members. So try to pick a better team in the first place. In fact picking the right team is the best way to ensure success for any project.

Second piece of advice:
If you''re stuck with the original team, then the best way to deal with over-ambitious features is to prioritise the features, what MUST you have in the game for it to be a FPS, what features SHOULD you have, what features would you LIKE to have, what features WONT be there. Try to limit the scope/features as much as possible (e.g. drop the level editor, just have text file descriptions of the level, flat ground is a good idea, etc). Hopefully you will then have a list of say 20 features in priority order. With these features, now plan to develop a first prototype by week 3 incorporating MUST have features, a second prototype by week 5 incorporating SHOULD have features, and a final product by week 7 incorporating LIKE to have features (leaving a week for final testing).

If overambitious projects are carried out like this, then you may find that rather than 3 weeks, it takes 8 weeks to develop prototype 1 - but at least you have developed a working FPS with the MUST have features included. At the other end of the scale, the less ambitious projects are more likely to get prototypes 1, 2 and final product finished.

This is a standard project methodology used in the business world and it is called DSDM - Dynamic Systems Development Methodology (www.dsdm.org)

Finally don''t be too ambitious with your MUST have features for prototype 1, what Paladine recommends:
unless maybe by FPS you mean "each character is represented by a single triangle and you can kill other differently colored triangles by shooting yet more differently colored triangles at them".
is a good starting point and good advice for prototype 1.

Good luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Re "The time it takes to build a FPS"

1.5 year in Java.
2.5 years in C++
Team 5-7 people (but rather 14), motivated to finish it.
Bigger teams have lower productivity gains. So team of 28 people wont be 28/14 faster.
(I actually like a temporally team member rotation. Graphic guy is supposed to do some programming, programmer AI design, AI guy sound, sound guy a little graphic. You have got the idea ~_^. You never know, there could be some undiscovered gems. And they would a little rest in the process. Of course this is nearly impossible with "freeware/voluntary" project, people working on them have regular work as well, so any bit of free time is actually helpful.)

Of course you can download some free engine, extend it and be done pretty fast. (With possible restrictions on distribution.)

to OP. It seems to be a nice communication problem. ^_^ Have you selected project lead?

[edited by - raghar on April 17, 2004 9:45:39 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Seeing as how noones actually provided you with the list you've asked for, and I consider myself unable to provide an accurate estimates of the tasks involved, a possible suggestion would be to simply show them this thread, which has plenty of experienced programmers saying the project cant be done - that should be enough to convince them if they're even semi-reasonable.

Also, it might help you to already have another more feasible design written up and ready to go if your trying to convince these people to do your project instead of this other guy's unreasonable one. Yes, I know you said you have an alternative idea, but how about some design documentation you can show them, otherwise its really just your word to them that your idea will actually be more feasible. Maybe you could even have some code done if your up to it.

One other thing that may help you convince them is to get an open-source FPS engine and/or game, and show them how complex and long the source code is (I'd suggest either doing it with the lead guy absent, or with source thats licenced in such a way as to be unusable to you, just in case your leader decides to use it instead of it helping you convince the others the project is unfeasible).

If you have the free time and skills required, and you cant find any other options, it may be worth your while to create a very simple solo-project to submit, so at least you have something to hand in.

[edited by - kazgoroth on April 17, 2004 11:09:35 AM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Here an example list following on from previous post. It''s just an example off the top of my head, there''s no estimates, but it shows how to break things down into a prioritised list with MUST have, SHOULD have, LIKE to have, and WONT be having features. It also shows breaking the project into 3 phases, with working prototypes being delivered at the end of the first 2 phases, and these prototypes evolving into the final product for the final phase. What is important here is that if you have severely underestimated the work, or overestimated your team''s capabilities, or ran into major hurdles when trying to work together, at least you have something that is finished with the early prototypes which you can hand in.

Prototype 1, week 3, MUST have features:
1. render an object as a triangle
2. render 2 or more objects as triangles
3. provide support for objects to be added or deleted from scene whilst app is running
4. get camera moving in world just turning left and right and moving forward and backward using keyboard
5. render a flat floor
6. allow objects to move with velocities, so the engine updates positions every frame
7. provide simple object collision detection (bounding spheres)
8. provide simple mechanism for steady framerate (not too fast)
9. add shoot function which creates an object (bullet) at the camera with a velocity in the direction the camera is facing, no up or down orientation just straight ahead
10. provide a hit feature whereby if the bullet object collides with the other objects, those objects are deleted from the scene
11. provide a scoring feature whereby when there are no objects left the level is complete, a message is displayed and the game ends.
12. test what you have done on other computers, especially those that your teachers/lecturers will be using
13. fix bugs found in testing
14. retest
15. ensure that the required documentation is complete, e.g. game design guide, engine design, user guide, etc

If you can do this, then congratulations you have produced something that could be classed as a FPS, albeit a very basic one, and you have finished your first game as a team. The player can move around, the scene gets updated, and there are these triangular objects (the enemy/targets) that the player must shoot. Hopefully, depending on the team''s skill levels, how you work together, how much effort you put in, this is completed by week 3, however you never know it might take 8 weeks. Nevertheless prototype 1 is finished, and if necessary this can be the final product. If you are on schedule then you can go on to the next phase of the prototype, if not you can just polish up what you already have (for course work, documentation is always the best thing to polish up last minute, since you''re less likely to break documentation).

Prototype 2, week 5, SHOULD have features:
16. support for texturing (objects and floor)
17. support for more complex object formats, an object can be made up of multiple triangles (a mesh), an object can consist of simple primitives likes blocks, spheres, cylinders, cones etc.
18. different types of objects (some are enemy/targets others are static like blocks, trees, houses)
19. support for textured skybox
20. sound effects
21. simple object animations (e.g. explosion when object is hit)
22. read in level information from a text file (e.g. objects, types, positions)
22. support for multiple levels
23. add mouse control
24. test what you have done on other computers, especially those that your teachers/lecturers will be using
25. fix bugs found in testing
26. retest
27. ensure that the required documentation is complete, e.g. game design guide, engine design, user guide, etc

This prototype should make the game less basic and more interesting with textures, simple 3D objects made out of more advanced primitives than just triangles, multiple levels, etc. The enemy do not move or they might just be targets you have to hit. As before, if prototype 2 is finished, this can be the final product if necessary. If you are on schedule then you can go on to the final phase of the prototype

Final product, week 8, LIKE to have features:
28. enemy objects AI, they can shoot back at you
29. handle the player being hit, reducing player lives, ending game if no lives left
30. add enemy movement and animations (simple enemy, simple animation, like hovertanks rather than something walking)
31. support for more complex object formats, perhaps reading in object format from a file, or using a 3rd party 3D model format
32. show the player''s gun from first person perspective
33. test what you have done on other computers, especially those that your teachers/lecturers will be using
34. fix bugs found in testing
35. retest
36. ensure that the required documentation is complete, e.g. game design guide, engine design, user guide, etc

You would be doing very well if you finished this final phase of the project, my guess is that you will not. This isn''t a problem because at least you will have something that looks finished to hand in with the prototype 1 or prototype 2. During the project stick to doing things in order, dont start prototype 2 features until prototype 1 is complete even if they are more interesting. Dont allow feature creep or new features to be added. If there is some work/feature you haven''t foreseen, then give it a priority in comparison to the other work and place it in the prioritised list, this might mean that some lower priority features are pushed out of the product completely (e.g. 31 and 32), or some feature is moved into a later prototype (e.g. 22 and 23 moved to final product phase). Some of the things to do at the end of each phase aren''t really features they are things you must do and are immovable (e.g. testing, bug-fixing documentation).

Finally, whilst it is important to have a prioritised list of features, its also important to make it clear to everyone what WONT be in, e.g.

Product WONT have the following features:
1. There will be no complex terrain, just flat ground
2. There will be no complex collision detection, just bounding spheres
3. There will be no indoor levels
4. There will be no 3rd person view, so you don''t have to worry about modelling the player
5. The player will not have the ability to get out of their vehicle
6. There will be no level editor
7. There will be no large levels, since there will be no bsp or complex frustrum culling, therefore only small levels will be supported
8. No joystick control
9. No shadows
10. No lightmapping
etc.

Don''t underestimate how difficult it is to work in a team on the same application, I know you originally thought that 2 programmers could work on their own applications (game, and level designer), but I think a level designer is out of the question for 8 weeks, so you will all (2 out or 4) be working on the one application. This is where it is important to split the application design up logically. Also 4 people working for 8 weeks doesn''t necessarily mean 32 man weeks of work. How much time can each of you devote per week, if its 4 days per week rather than 5 (9 to 5), then thats less than 7 weeks each (28 man weeks total). If only 2 are programming then thats 14 man weeks on programming, etc.

Best of luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Kazgoroth
Also, it might help you to already have another more feasible design written up and ready to go if your trying to convince these people to do your project instead of this other guy's unreasonable one. Yes, I know you said you have an alternative idea, but how about some design documentation you can show them, otherwise its really just your word to them that your idea will actually be more feasible. Maybe you could even have some code done if your up to it.



Ok, that's a very good idea, i'll try to get on that.

quote:

One other thing that may help you convince them is to get an open-source FPS engine and/or game, and show them how complex and long the source code is (I'd suggest either doing it with the lead guy absent, or with source thats licenced in such a way as to be unusable to you, just in case your leader decides to use it instead of it helping you convince the others the project is unfeasible).



That sounds like a good idea, but even if it's licenced i think he'll say, "This makes it even easier, cause now we have somethign we can look at to tell if we're going in the right direction or not". I think if i tell my team that most likely we'll end up building a game where you're a triangle, you shoot at triangles, and you shoot triangles, that will convince them that this game is a shitty idea. Of course i'd rather just switch groups. My idea is an advanced version of pong, it's much more reasonable to expect cool graphics from that type of game in 8 weeks than his right? Or should i expect to be using triangles for everything too?

abstractworlds: thanks

[edited by - tieTYT on April 17, 2004 2:37:06 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For my graphics unit at uni I made a very simple FPS style demo in about 8 weeks. I stress VERY SIMPLE. It consisted of one large room (No portals etc), shadow mapping, 1 weapon, basic physics, basic collision detection, and no model for the player (you can''t see yourself in a fps ).

During the construction of this FPS I ran into all sorts of nasty suprises that you can only see when you reach them. I had one particularly bad one with the collision detection that took me about a half a week to resolve.

What your team wants to do is over ambitous in the extreme. Just my simple FPS chewed up a huge portion of my time and many sleepless nights. The media construction for you game alone will require atleast one person going fulltime and that would be just for the utter basics. The animation (keyframing, kinetics) will require another person full time. The graphics/core system will require another fulltime and the game layer will require another. And all of these will have to be done concurrently whilst ensuring compatabilty with each other. You are in for a nightmare of a ride that will very likely end disasterously.

And if you are thinking of adding multiplayer to your game, FORGET IT, it will cause a whole case load of unforeseen problems even greater than those you will experience in all the other areas of your game design. If you include multiplayer your entire game engine has to be built around it and you will need to handle 101 whatifs for network communication. You cannot slap the multiplayer portion onto your game after you have mostly completed the game.

Go for something simple, maybe a 3d asteroids or space invaders clone.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
My idea is an advanced version of pong, it''s much more reasonable to expect cool graphics from that type of game in 8 weeks than his right? Or should i expect to be using triangles for everything too?


Well, this does on the surface sound like a much more feasible idea, a pong clone is very doable as long as you are organised and put in the effort. As to the ''cool graphics'', that all depends on exactly how cool you want your graphics, and how advanced the gameplay itself is. A pong type game can be made to look very nice even with very simple graphics, as it is by nature a simple game and therefore doesnt require any overly complex graphics. My advice however, is to make sure your gameplay is working properly before you worry about the quality of the graphics overly much (although dont neglect the graphics to the point where it detracts from the quality of the game).

Even if you favor the idea of switching to a new team, it would probably still be a good idea to produce some documentation (and maybe even a start on the coding) for your idea, as the team you join could very well have thier own idea. Also, be prepared to work on someone else''s idea - at this stage its more important for you to pass, and to hopefully get good grades - you can always make your cool game design later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement