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Underwater physic

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I''ve got some interesting in submarines moving underwater and collision them. How to calculate the resistance force of water ? What kind of resistance occurs when turning ? Friction ? How to calculate ? Any speciality in collision ? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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If you''re just dealing with a single submarine then I think everything will work as normal, just slower (since you require more force to move through water since it has a higher density than air). Collision detection is normal as well.

It starts getting interesting when you have multiple objects and you want currents induced by one object to affect the others. For this I can see two options, either do a fluid simulation of the water or take two toy submarines into the bath, watch what happens and code it as if statements

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Search the forum archives for "drag" or "drag force". The equations for drag for objects in air can be applied to objects in water as well. This will partially help you. For example, this can give you quite good estimates of drag for the submarine as it moves foward, accelerates and deccelarates along its axis.

Since a submarine is a long, slender body, you will get side forces as well due to the water, and this comes into play when turning. I don''t have any immediate advice on this, other than to give you some search terms to try in google:

"slender body"
"slender body lift"
"slender body drag"
"slender body theory"



Graham Rhodes
Principal Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.

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joanusdmentia,

GOOD point about flow interactions with multiple objects! I think EverIce can ignore this and treat the objects individually---from a fluid flow/fluid forces point-of-view---for a first cut. The mass and size and slow motion of the subs probably means there would only be very subtle, higher-order effects due to flow interaction.

Graham Rhodes
Principal Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.

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