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Game Dev Should I?

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HI, im asking this question with out expecting a arragont reply im new with c++ i can barly make a console-mode program that says hello world and ask for an age and prints it back onto screen, anyway i wondering isit worth it learnin c++ and all that mombo jumbo and startin game dev i mean after readin some of these threads ive realised its nearly impossible is this true or is there another hobbie i can look into? d.b

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quote:
Original post by daviebwoy
HI, im asking this question with out expecting a arragont reply im new with c++ i can barly make a console-mode program that says hello world and ask for an age and prints it back onto screen
You just started. Can''t tell. It''s like asking your teacher in the first day of the semester, "Hi, do you think I can pass the final exam?"

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It's just like any other learning process. It just takes some time and dedication to the task at hand. If you really want to learn it you can.

The most important thing, in my opinion, is to pick something as soon as possible - something simple you want to try to make. Learning by reading a book without understand a practical application of the knowledge won't help you much, and you'll learn faster if you're learning things you are using immediately.

[edited by - SantaClaws on April 21, 2004 3:02:58 PM]

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it just depends really on wheather you like programming or not. if you dont enjoy programming, then, no, your not going to like making games. if you enjoy programming (and want to make a living out of it maybe) then game programing is an exccellent hobby. i didnt even know if i would like programming or not when i started going to school, i just kinda said "scrwe it". i started learning programming my second semester at school (5 months ago) and i loved it from the begining. im going to work as a professional programmer one day and for now im having fun making my own little games, not to mention im learning a lot about programming while doing it. i started learning to program when the rest of my class started to learn to program (5 months ago) and right now, our class just yesterday learned what a structure is. (yes, a structure, not even a class). my class is struggling with learning structures and im already working on my third game with graphics . so like i said, if you want to work as a programmer, this is a wonderfull hobby which will help you get a job one day.

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thanks for the fast! replys, anyway ive got a book by sams publishing called sams teach yourself visuall c++ in 24 hours i was recommended it and i can say in the 2nd chapter wich is page 21(i think) it start tellin u about classes and structors and wot about of memory boleans have after reading chapter one and two of this book i cant be botherd to go on its so confusing does anyone know any good online tutorials or anything that can get me started so i can start making easy 2d games like tetres or falling blocks please referre me to all the links and stuff u fink ill need and what''ll be helpful sorry for my spelling ive bin smoking and once again thanx for the fast replies

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quote:
Original post by daviebwoy
sams teach yourself visuall c++ in 24 hours
Don''t buy that book. I have been hearing bad things about it. In addition, IMO, learning a language like C++ takes at least a month or two to grasp, not 24 hours. People want to do everything as fast as they can, and some people turn this behavior to profit. Learn XXX in 24 hours, Learn Japanese in 1 day, etc. Don''t buy any of those books.

I can''t recommend a good book either since I learned C from a very old C book that''s out of print by now, and C++ from forums, chats, and tutorials, but I have heard Deitel&Deitel is a good one.

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ok i understanded chapter one well easierly but chapter 2 read this:


Using Different Variable Types:
So far, you''ve used integer (type int) variables, one of the fundamental types avaible in C++. They''re called fundamental types because they are basic data types that work just like built-in types. The names of the built-in types used in C++ include the following:
. Bool is a Bolean variable that can have the values true of false.(easy)

. char is a vairble normally used for storing characters. In visual C++, it can have any value from -128 to 127. If char is declared as unsigned, its range is from 0 to 255, and no negative values are allowed (EASY! still)

.A short int variable, sometimes just written as short, is similar to an int, but it can contain a smaller range of values.A short variable can store any scalar (whole) value between -32768 and 32767. If a short is declared as unsigned, its range is from 0 to 655535 (im lost from there on)
wots all that mumbo jumbo shit im gettin so confused but i aint typin no more of the book anyway is there any good tutorials u''z used from of the net that got u writingc++

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I think maybe programming isn't the right hobby for you ... !?
There is nothing to understand there.
Just remember there is a chapter where different kinds of variables are explained.
If you have troubles with variables later look it up.

Read from many sources. Don't try to understand every detail.
Things will make more and more sense.

It had to be following a game tutorial for me too (a simple one in German).
I'm writing a tutorial ... but it looks scary.
I'll have to organize it better.

I could never learn about pointers for example without knowing what I'll need them for.
But as soon as I know that something is important it gets interesing.
That is how it should be IMO.

About tutorials ... there are many articles there:
http://gamedev.net/reference

Recently those links were posted here.
They look great as far as I can tell.
http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial
http://www.uow.edu.au/~nabg/ABC/ABC.html

---
Tolop

[edited by - Clueless on April 21, 2004 4:12:48 PM]

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Ok, first things first...

quote:

A short int variable, sometimes just written as short, is similar to an int, but it can contain a smaller range of values. A short variable can store any scalar (whole) value between -32768 and 32767.



To be honest...i'm not really sure what you don't understand. In that short you can fit values in the range of -32768 to 32767. If you start at 0 and keep adding you'll eventually come to 32767, and when you add one more it will "loop", that is you will NOT get 32768, you will get -32768. That is because a short can't keep values larger than 32767. Not sure if this makes any sense...

quote:

If a short is declared as unsigned, its range is from 0 to 655535 (im lost from there on)



Right, so you have a number that equals 33000 but that dosn't fit into a short. If you try it will "loop" and become negative, and not the value you wish. Now one way to solve this problem is to type unsigned short someVariable; . This way your short will range, instead from -32768 to 32767, from 0 to 65535. Unsigned basically tells that a variable of this type can't be negative(...or has no sign infront of the value ).


And for those tutorials. I have learnt very much from GameTutorials.com and their C++ tutorials. They are easy to understand and they start with the most basic, and in time advance to more complicated stuff...

Hope this helps


[edited by - Android_s on April 21, 2004 4:06:09 PM]

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I definitely agree with Oluseyi. Even though my prefered language is C++, I realize that it isn''t exactly easy, and it''s way beyond easy for someone who isn''t already use to, or at least, very naturally inclined to understand programming concepts.

Python and Java might be good places to start, although I have little experience with them, so I can''t strongly agree or disagree here. But I do know that there have probably been a lot of people here (including myself) that learned on some form of BASIC. QBASIC can be a pretty simple way to learn basics, or Visual Basic can be quite nice too, especially since you can get reasonably nice looking, and easy to use visual interfaces very quickly.

But there will probably be those people who say, "Bullcrap, beginners can manage quite well learning C++ first." They''re correct, sometimes. But on the whole, most people would probably be better off learning an easier language first. Unless you insist on (potentially) pushing yourself quite hard, and are prepared to have a huge degree of determination (because it might be required), go with something easier for now, and come back to C++ after you feel confident about the basics of programming, at least.


Most of the greatest evils that man has inflicted upon man have come through people feeling quite certain about something which, in fact, was false.

-Bertrand Russell, Unpopular Essays, "Ideas That Have Harmed Mankind"

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thank you very much for ur replies and for da guy dat asked if its a joke its not as much of a joke as ur mum giving me head last night anyway i think ill look into tryin c basic first thanx

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Ok, i don''t know if this is waaaay back or not, but the guy that wants to know about the book with the C++ in 24 hours...

Take the advice of everyone here and start with an easier lang. i''d suggest Visual Basic. it''s not that difficult, mostly plain english, and you have a compiler, abi, limited, with MS Office. The VBA in Excel can be used to store data, and you can even have graphics and stuff. we made some simple random roll dice games and things just by learning VBA.

That led to good a healthy background in VB6, and now i''m learning C++.

But i definately agree. don''t start at C++ if you don''t understand variables.

«§øùl Ëס§†ëñçê»

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daviebwoy:

Firstly a warning; Any more personal attacks like that and you'll find yourself "nearly banned".

Now for the advice; I'm glad you're going to stick with it. Learning to make games is a long and involved process, it takes time and dedication. Persistence is what's going to get you through so don't give up.

Visit the forum FAQ for some links to good tutorials and some basic pointers for beginners and if you haven't already, visit "Start Here" for a very helpful step by step guide.

[edited by - tiffany_smith on April 21, 2004 5:12:56 PM]

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