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Wavinator

"Psst! Hey you! Yeah, you! I wanna talk to you..."

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Pardon me for making this "Night of The Living Wavintor Posts" but the muse is working overtime... I read about a weird little device that debuted in Japan a few years meant to get people together. It was either a radio or cell phone that continuously broadcasted and listened for signals indicating your interests. Whenever two people got near each other their devices would chime or ring, and presummably (if they were on the subway, for instance, or at a party) they''d have an excuse to strike up a conversation. Wouldn''t this be a godsend in your average RPG? The typical RPG makes you check everyone for what you''re interested in, or tells you EXACTLY who you''re supposed to find and where they are. But what if you''re free-roaming on your own, and want to find the best price for a weapon, or the greatest palm-reader. If there were a large number of NPCs, it would be nice to home in on only those you want to bother with. You could add as many NPCs as you please without worrying about fatigue the player would experience in having to check them all. You could have a screen with settings that the player toggles on or off. As you get rolling in an RPG, you tend to want to do things quickly. The way I''d do this is to have a device, like a PDA or implant, that the player levels up to get or buy. In the beginning, the range would be small, so that they''d have incentive to explore locations and find people. As they level up or can afford better devices, the range increases until, at a glance, they can home in on the best NPCs that meet whatever criteria they''ve checked. ???? -------------------- Just waiting for the mothership...

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Hmm... I agree that a way to quickly identify things around you and evaluate their significane is a valuable feature.

This might be similar to the ship-identifying broadcasts, but on an individual level. Would the NPCs have to have themselves wired to transmit, or could you build an active system that would identify bounty heads or contacts by scanning them from a distance?

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That would indeed be really cool. I can''t think how it could be implemented in a fantasy or anarchic world rather than a socialist or other strongly socially organized science fiction one though.

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Sounds like a great idea. It could be a magical item in a fantasy game. Why not take this even further and have NPCs just go to the player and ask them for stuff? I''m sure this is occasionally done in some games, but in most games you have to trigger events, find quests, etc. by yourself. This could even work for the best weapon prices or best palm reader. NPCs could advertise based on skill level, prices, etc.

You could take this to it''s ultimate conclusion and just make a fully searchable "google" RPG. Any time you go into a town you can just search for what you want and instantly teleport to where you want to go. In this case the exploration aspect is less the standard "wandering around and talking to everyone" and more noise filtering. Some MMORPGs have features like this for finding groups and players, and many large single player RPGs have searchable journals and maps, but I don''t think any game has taken it this far.

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ahh, another Wavinator post run for you lives!!!


It could be a neat little system, I picture some kind of infotech pager system. You type in requests that activly ping all the near by infotech recivers. So you type in "looking for a gunsmith who can make level 5 guns" or "Anyone need a ride to saturn?" These added to pager list, and if any of the pinged recivers are instrested or have what you want they send you message. So you get the message "Ya, I need passage for 3 and 1 six legged cow to saturn, I only deal with level 2 certifed transports, if you can provided those services reply with a quote."

So you exchange little message back and forth like that until you find what your looking for.

-----------------------------------------------------
"Fate and Destiny only give you the opportunity the rest you have to do on your own."
Current Design project: Ambitions Slave

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Good idea, reminds me of my idea of having your party go off and strike up their own conversations to find stuff out, then when they get back to the pub you can find out what they know (ie. a summary of the gossip).

If you allow the player to wander just take out the bits that they encounter... of course that just rewards the player for not talking to other characters.. eek!

This idea came from getting bored with having to talk to everybody in the game to make sure I didn''t miss anything. Which is one of the problems that I have with most RPGs, since it considerably slows it down. I think that sometimes more is less, and less is more.

Sure chatting does add to the ''flavour'' of these games. But I reckon that more action packed games could benefit from such a system.

First thought that came to mind would be calling the phone services, and asking for the number for a pizza / the best weaponsmith in town

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quote:
Original post by Iron Chef Carnage
This might be similar to the ship-identifying broadcasts, but on an individual level. Would the NPCs have to have themselves wired to transmit, or could you build an active system that would identify bounty heads or contacts by scanning them from a distance?


I like the idea of an image recognition system for bounties or people who don''t want to be found. Star Wars Bounty Hunter implied such a system when you scanned the crowd. You''d face a certain way and it''d pick out which of the very similar-looking NPCs actually was the guy you wanted.


There''s another way of doing this, too. You could have different social networks if it were a standard thing, such as an implant. You could have criminal networks, corporate networks, freelancer networks, etc. These would be like radio bands. Then you could put some gameplay into contacting the right person and persuading/coercing their network access codes out of them so that you could start trawling or hunting the net.

I don''t know how contacts would work for a lower tech system. For bounties you assume people are wanted and they have a features that can be matched. But if you want to offer someone a job, or want a ride, how could you tell that actively? (Pheremones? )

(BTW, this could work for driving, as well. Maybe cars have radios as standard, and you enter conversation with other drivers just as easily as while walking around town.)

--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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quote:
Original post by sunandshadow
That would indeed be really cool. I can''t think how it could be implemented in a fantasy or anarchic world rather than a socialist or other strongly socially organized science fiction one though.


How about familiars that are busy off in another dimension gabbing with one another and popping back occassionally?

Or magick spectacles? Or animate scrolls or ledgers that you speak to, tell your wishes, and who sing a wordless song to all other like objects in your local area.

See, this is why I never worry about my ideas being stolen. Once you''ve got the bare bones, you can put ANY frame around it!

--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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quote:
Original post by Impossible
Why not take this even further and have NPCs just go to the player and ask them for stuff?



Oh, perfect! It could work both ways. The player enters settings, and NPCs come to him or her. They could even be con artists and enter in settings that aren''t really true.

quote:

You could take this to it''s ultimate conclusion and just make a fully searchable "google" RPG. Any time you go into a town you can just search for what you want and instantly teleport to where you want to go. In this case the exploration aspect is less the standard "wandering around and talking to everyone" and more noise filtering.


I think it''s still important to get players around in your virtual world, though. So by limiting the range or what have you, you encourage their exploration. Otherwise, you have this bizarre phenomena of someone sitting at their computer, sitting at a virtual computer, experiencing the world.



--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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quote:
Original post by TechnoGoth
ahh, another Wavinator post run for you lives!!!



Yeah, I was starting to feel a bit like Agent Smith, with every post in the forum being from "Wavinator."

quote:

So you exchange little message back and forth like that until you find what your looking for.



This is a nice refinement, with you perhaps setting up the final meeting once this phase is done. The person-to-person contact brings about a bit of risk, and has a certain amount of flavor, so I want to be sure that this whole process can''t be automated.

--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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Indeed this would be very cool I know that device what you talking about, it also connects through Mobile Phones and the likes.

For a game it would be cool, but if you dont like the fact that everyone knows everyone because of this device, you could make it so that you could put your self in to a database ingame if you would like to hook up with others or something like that. That way only people really searching for others use this and those lone gunners, or bandit pirates that want to stay anonymous can stay just that..

Just a thought

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another method, not quite as complicated:

A prompt window that is visible at the top of the screen will fill the player in on details throughout the game, based on what object he has targeted or is up against. This would include people as well. A person that is a generic character will be named as such (i.e. "townsperson" or "kid") but important people are deemed proper names, ranging from "The Blacksmith" or "The Informant" up to first names "Garth" or "Elise".

Not quite as revolutionary, but methinks it would do the job if your idea proved too difficult.

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Why dont you just make like in proper RPGs and play it with a roll of dice ?

If my players want to find something, they just go to the nearest person they can find and *ask directions*
If they manage a roll on ... say, their Streetwise skill, it just happens that they are talking to someone who actually can help them.
Depending on how succesful their roll is, they get great informations, or possibly the NPC they are talking to actually *has* what they want (or can lead them where he can get).
For instance, a marginal succes would let the NPC tell you where you should go to possibly get a better answer ("a turbo charger ? is that for an engine ? I dunno, maybe if you go to the SpacePort district you can find somebody that can help you"), a good success would give you some useful info ("If you go to the SpacePort district and you look for a place called Engines Gallore, I am pretty sure they ll have what you need") and an exceptional success would correspond to a lucky shot ("you are lucky, I happen to be selling mine ! Why dont you come with me and we can sort something out")

Think of it as in real life. You are a marijuana smoker and you want some. If you are good at this sort of thing, you ll quickly home in on the kind of area where you are more likely to meet the kind of person that could direct you to a dealer.

Same thing here, the roll would be modified by the area you are in (a squeaky clean posh estate), the location/building (a seedy looking bar), and other conditions (at night, on a "free trade" planet).
Obviously some things are just NOT available, or very difficult depending on where you are, etc.
There are quite a few factors here, but the idea is still sound, IMHO.
Similarly, you wont go ask a cop where you can get some hash... (well, unless you live here in Ireland, uh uh )

If your roll was succesful and you were given directions, then a new "interesting location" would appear on your map, for you to visit.
Of course, here I am relying on your ability to generate such locations and characters on the fly. Just like in a real RPG.

I dunno about you, but I think it''s a more elegant solution than the "rabbit out of a hat" that you are proposing here.
If you can keep things in the roleplay, rather than use some out of character gizmo.

Of course, a gizmo like a phonebook, or town guide, could be used in character to get the answer you want. You would do your skill roll on the given item, and would get answers in a similar fashion to that used with NPCs. And there would be similar restrictions to the things you could find (i.e. you would get big bonuses for particular things, but other info would be impossible to find. A phonebook would allow you to find a person, but it would be much harder to find say, a particular item).

The difficulty I see in implementing the system would be on the freedom given to the player to ask questions.
How do you make it so that they can look for almost anything, while ensuring that the appropriate roll is made.
How do you let the player ask questions ?

Not an easy one, eh ?


Sancte Isidore ora pro nobis !

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quote:
Original post by ahw
Why dont you just make like in proper RPGs and play it with a roll of dice ?

...

The difficulty I see in implementing the system would be on the freedom given to the player to ask questions.
How do you make it so that they can look for almost anything, while ensuring that the appropriate roll is made.
How do you let the player ask questions ?

Not an easy one, eh ?



No, it''s so much easier to do things in a pen & paper RPG because you have a massively powerful computer figuring things out-- the human brain.

You could imbed a possible random encounter in every citizen, yes. But I see two problems with this:

First, if the player''s skills are too low, they''ll be back to asking everyone in the whole town for what they need. In a city the size of Manhattan or Paris, that just won''t cut it (not that RPGs ever give us towns this size, but just pretend for a moment.)

Secondly, if any townie is a possible contact, players will sit at the airport / spaceport essentially "farming" contacts. That is, they won''t explore the city looking for people to talk to. It''s rather like sitting on your computer in a chat room. Everyone comes to you, so to speak. There''s no sense of adventure of actually running around different neighborhoods, and there''s no danger inherent in possibly being in a bad place at the wrong time.

With the broadcast gimmick, you at least have targets on radar that you have to physically move in range to address. This theoretically will get you moving around the city, and thus make the city more valuable as a gameworld object.


--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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Ah but that''s where roll modifiers come into play my friend
If you sit at the airport, mostly you ll be asking business travellers, students, families going on holidays, military crew on transit, traders. So you would get bonuses on your roll for the kind of stuff whoever you ask to would know about.
To get what you want, you would have to go to the right kind of place, and ask the right kind of people, to increase your bonuses and thus increase your chance of success.

I base my idea on the fact that every NPC you talk to isnt just a NPC, but has stats that make him/her a unique individual (from the moment you talk to him, that''s the trick)

See, the power of the computer is precisely in the area which is the most difficult for a human Storyteller : the computer can generate large amount of data on the fly without even blinking, totally fooling you into thinking the character you are now asking directions from is ''important''.
With a bit of experience, a human DM can do the same, but it''s still pretty difficult if you have never done this before.

Another thing I see, is that you are thinking in the same lines that we have seen used and abused by all RPGs so far. That is, "find the NPC with the dialogues".
It''s ridiculous. Why would it be any problem to reassign dialogues to the NPC the playe are adressing at the moment ?

Again, in PnP RPGs, if my players are roleplaying great, and are asking the right questions to that NPC I just totally improvised, and are making the right rolls, then I dont have a problem taking the dialogues and info I had planned to give them later on when they were supposed to meet the ''important NPC''.
But the players being them, surprised me and took another path.
Well, no problem, copy/paste onto the new improvised plotline.
Same difference, and the players never saw the difference.

I dont see why it''s so difficult to separate dialogues/info/interactions from the NPC. Possibly it''s because I am assuming other elements of design in the back of my head which you aint, but still, you can see where I am coming from, no ?


Sancte Isidore ora pro nobis !

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quote:
Original post by ahw
Another thing I see, is that you are thinking in the same lines that we have seen used and abused by all RPGs so far. That is, "find the NPC with the dialogues".
It''s ridiculous. Why would it be any problem to reassign dialogues to the NPC the playe are adressing at the moment ?



Yeh, I agree. Who wants to talk to every character in a Final Fantasy game?

However, I''d say that depending on the character (if they aren''t totally generic clones) there might be some different ''stylistic'' choices. Ie. One person would tell you something differently to another. But I suppose you could just have 3-7 standard sentences.. and a list of different words that could be substituted.

These bandits have really been getting in the way of my mining/stagecoach business, my brother / friend / neighbour told me / said that / etc. they live up North / by the River Teoch.

etc.

And important NPCs would still have their prescripted dialogue.

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I remember in the Zelda games that when you walked up to somebody and hit "B" it was as if you had just told them your life story. Perfect strangers would say things like, "So you're looking for the Master Sword?" or "Good to meet you! I've heard good things about your Uncle!" or "If you're going to sneak into the castle, you should talk to Jeremy."

Maybe if you could start off a conversation in a number of different ways, you'd be able to get some information from anyone, but specific information from a few. "Can you direct me to the railway station?" might be a good thing to ask anyone, especially if you're looking to get your buttocks fondled *rimshot*, but "Who do I talk to if I want a big illegal ship upgrade?" should be used with restraint, and "Where does Jimmy Randall live?" Would mean nothing to the average citizen.

Edit: I put brackets around the letter B above, and bolded the whole post. Hah!

[edited by - Iron Chef Carnage on April 24, 2004 2:01:57 PM]

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quote:
Original post by ahw
Ah but that's where roll modifiers come into play my friend
If you sit at the airport, mostly you ll be asking business travellers, students, families going on holidays, military crew on transit, traders. So you would get bonuses on your roll for the kind of stuff whoever you ask to would know about.
To get what you want, you would have to go to the right kind of place, and ask the right kind of people, to increase your bonuses and thus increase your chance of success.

I base my idea on the fact that every NPC you talk to isnt just a NPC, but has stats that make him/her a unique individual (from the moment you talk to him, that's the trick)

See, the power of the computer is precisely in the area which is the most difficult for a human Storyteller : the computer can generate large amount of data on the fly without even blinking, totally fooling you into thinking the character you are now asking directions from is 'important'.
With a bit of experience, a human DM can do the same, but it's still pretty difficult if you have never done this before.



Okay, I'm inclined to agree in principle but not in practice. Two reasons why: First, art. In game, asset limits limit you to only X number of costumes and Y faces. You'd have no idea whether or not you've already talked to someone when people look so similar. You could give the NPCs names over their heads, breaking immersion and logic, but then you'd task people to remember dozens of different names. I think the brain deals with faces far more efficiently than labels, sociobiologically speaking.

Second, you still theoretically have to wade through NPCs to get what you want in most cases until you make your roll. I can't count the number of times I just wanted to shout out in a crowded marketplace, "which one of you idiots sells the minigun I need to advance into the enemy's base?!?!" With a beacon approach, you know generally where to go and who might have what you want.

quote:

Another thing I see, is that you are thinking in the same lines that we have seen used and abused by all RPGs so far. That is, "find the NPC with the dialogues".
It's ridiculous. Why would it be any problem to reassign dialogues to the NPC the playe are adressing at the moment ?



You're only considering the singular case. COnsider: The system reassigns the dialogs to the NPC you conveniently happen to be talking to. You leave the area. Now is that dialog-response chain locked to that NPC? Or, when you talk to another random NPC, does the the system again reassign the either part or all of the dialog to a new NPC? What happens if you talk to 20 random NPCs throughout the gameworld, making your roll successfully for each? Does the percentage chance that a random NPC having what you want go down the more random NPCs you speak to for the sake of continuity? Are all these guys just going to be, by happenstance, related?

If not, then once you lock a dialog with an NPC, you're back to square one: Searching out that NPC again (God help you if you met her at a crowded train station) and, while trying to find her, dealing with an endless supply of NPCs who don't have what you need.

quote:

I dont see why it's so difficult to separate dialogues/info/interactions from the NPC. Possibly it's because I am assuming other elements of design in the back of my head which you aint, but still, you can see where I am coming from, no ?


I think it would be technically feasible, but have serious continuity problems. You end up with two choices:


  • Either everyone in the game world appears to know everything, provided that players make their rolls. That means that the butler, homeless guy, shaman and exchange student all know about the secret genetic research base, and you now have to invent a context why, especially the more NPCs the players talk to. Not only does this kill suspension of disbelief and veracity, players now no longer need to choose who they talk to for the most part because the GM will always give them the information, whether they should logically know it or not
  • Or, everyone doesn't know everything, and in the best case scenario can only act as a funnel to the REAL person you're trying to reach. This is really no different than the interest-detecting gizmo.



--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

[edited by - wavinator on April 24, 2004 11:15:31 PM]

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quote:
Original post by Iron Chef Carnage
Maybe if you could start off a conversation in a number of different ways, you''d be able to get some information from anyone, but specific information from a few. "Can you direct me to the railway station?" might be a good thing to ask anyone, especially if you''re looking to get your buttocks fondled *rimshot*, but "Who do I talk to if I want a big illegal ship upgrade?" should be used with restraint, and "Where does Jimmy Randall live?" Would mean nothing to the average citizen.



There''s an expectation that the larger the population, the more that everyone''s a stranger. So if you can walk up to anyone and have that encounter be automatically relevant to exactly what you need, you''ll have players thinking that kismet rules the universe.

For this reason, I''m very inclined to have NPCs who can toss of generally known information, random factoids, a bit of pregenerated history worded correctly (such as where they''re from, what they did), and litter this all with opinion and some ignorance. This is just cultural flavoring.

But if you''re really itching to simply get something done without the chit-chat, you''ll tap into the various social networks and upgrade your equipment to do so.



--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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quote:
Original post by Wavinator
Or, everyone doesn''t know everything, and in the best case scenario can only act as a funnel to the REAL person you''re trying to reach. This is really no different than the interest-detecting gizmo.



Yes. My point exactly ! I am just trying to avoid the "gizmo" concept because I think it''s, well, like I said "out of character". I dont like directing my players with big neon signs flashing "this way for the next part of the story", and I feel this is exactly what the gizmo does : "let''s cut the chase and give you the XP right now". This implies that the rest of the world is going to be boring and repetitive and can be safely ignored.
Why not just play Experience Quest while you are at it !
I mean, come on !

Just because the player rolls the dice doesnt mean he has a chance in hell to suceed. That''s what I meant when I talke of modifiers. Just because a player has a skill doesnt mean he actually *has* a chance of succeeding if you as a DM decides that, for dramatic reasons, the player shouldnt succeed at all.
Case in point, my players got visited by a Goddess and one of them decided to ATTACK her (The sheer horror of playing with people like that !). Did I roll a dice ? You bet I didnt.

Same in our case. Some things you can ask for to anyone ("Where is the town hall"), some you can only ask if conditions are met (say, unless you are in the Docks district, in a seedy tavern, no one will know about Seedy Sam the Smuggler. Or possibly you would attract unwanted attention from respectable citizens that would report you to the Guard...)

I still think with a *good* design, there could be some really interesting possibilities for gameplay.
Maybe this should be something to try as a separate project. Design some sort of unique dialogue system that allows for such open style gameplay ? It would make sense in a supposedly open style universe, wouldnt it ?




Sancte Isidore ora pro nobis !

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On a side note, those cell-phone/radio devices you referred to are being used in England as a way to hook up with strangers for some risky sexual behavior.

Sounds like a worthwhile idea for a game though Wavinator.

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LOL That''s exactly what I remembered those gizmos being talked about too The idea being that instead of approaching some total stranger in the street asking them if they are gay, the "gaydar" simply buzzes or something if you meet another gay weraing one...
...go figure !


Sancte Isidore ora pro nobis !

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quote:
Original post by ahw
Yes. My point exactly ! I am just trying to avoid the "gizmo" concept because I think it''s, well, like I said "out of character".



Out of character in a sci-fi game where implants are as common as tatoos?!?!?!

Actually, I do understand, and it does limit me to using technology as a gimmick. I have to assume, then, that all races you can interact with are on a similar standard. That''s not too hard, because they come from the post-apocalyptic remains of one great civilization, but it is a little contrived.

It would also be darned convenient, though, too.

quote:

I dont like directing my players with big neon signs flashing "this way for the next part of the story", and I feel this is exactly what the gizmo does : "let''s cut the chase and give you the XP right now". This implies that the rest of the world is going to be boring and repetitive and can be safely ignored.



I understand your point. But keep in mind that this isn''t really for a story. This is for an open-ended environment where you choose who to interact with, more like a sim. Sure, the missions will have story and chained together people you''re supposed to talk to, but in that sense, it''s contextually appropriate for you to know who to go to in most cases.

But for sorting out the wheat from the chaff in semi-random encounters, I like the idea of being drawn towards different people with different beacons. It even stops you from asking 100 unrelated people at the airport about something which only one of them knows about.

quote:

Just because the player rolls the dice doesnt mean he has a chance in hell to suceed. That''s what I meant when I talke of modifiers. Just because a player has a skill doesnt mean he actually *has* a chance of succeeding if you as a DM decides that, for dramatic reasons, the player shouldnt succeed at all.



Yes, but consider that you''re thinking like a DM, not like a player. Have inflicted upon you the desire to talk to someone in all of Paris about clueing you in on where to get advanced computers, for instance, and imagine having to wade through the sea of "nope, can''t help you responses." You''ll quickly get disgusted, and while NPCs will never number that many, consider a city that is segmented in such a way that there could be the illusion of thousands of NPCs, as they get randomly created and destroyed as they move through your boundaries of perception. Not fun.

quote:

Case in point, my players got visited by a Goddess and one of them decided to ATTACK her (The sheer horror of playing with people like that !). Did I roll a dice ? You bet I didnt.



LOL! I think the main difference here is that you''re creating highly specific content while I''m trying to come up with a generic system that can be turned specific, then giving you the ability to seek out those NPCs.


--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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quote:
Original post by stevelat
On a side note, those cell-phone/radio devices you referred to are being used in England as a way to hook up with strangers for some risky sexual behavior.




quote:
Original post by ahw
LOL That''s exactly what I remembered those gizmos being talked about too


Aha! So this is a FUTURE TREND, then, no? So it is conceivable that it would spread from less libidnic uses to more everyday, practical ones? That you could have multiple wireless networks which these things operated on?

You could have criminal networks set up in constantly moving abandoned buildings in the slums, which criminals use to hook-up with other criminals. You coudl make this a religious pilgrim thing, and definitely appropriate for any faction.



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Just waiting for the mothership...

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Yeah, since it does exist, it would make sense that such a gizmo could *possibly* be extended to something bigger.

But think about this : such a gizmo allow you to find people "with common interests" without openly displaying those interest. But what prevents people who want to find you to also wear those same gizmo to hunt you down ? Uh ?
Case in point : since gays have adopted the skinhead look as a defensive mimicry tactic, what prevents a skinhead to wear one of those gizmos to go gay bashing ?
Or in your game, if networks of gangsters wear one of those "tags" set on a specific frequency to avoid eavesdropping, what prevent the police forces to develop scanners that will listen in on a frequency range to spot broadcasters, and develop a database of frequently used frequencies that are used by various groups...

I dont think as a system it would be viable for very long.

Now having a database on your PDA, similar to an adress book, but that you could extend to contain more "interesting" info by loading plugins. *that* would make perfect sense, and you could use your "gizmo" system.

I think my point was just that I dont like taking out the roleplaying element when you can use it.
The only difficulty (the biggest, obviously) being to develop a new style of GUI.
But dont you think designing a new concept of GUI is a bit more interesting than reusing 20 something years old concepts ?


quote:
Wavinator
Yes, but consider that you''re thinking like a DM, not like a player. Have inflicted upon you the desire to talk to someone in all of Paris about clueing you in on where to get advanced computers, for instance, and imagine having to wade through the sea of "nope, can''t help you responses." You''ll quickly get disgusted, and while NPCs will never number that many, consider a city that is segmented in such a way that there could be the illusion of thousands of NPCs, as they get randomly created and destroyed as they move through your boundaries of perception. Not fun.


I think if my players are stupid enough to stay in the street and wait until statistics give them what they want, they deserve the boredom they will receive.
A good player would narrow down his "search domain" until the chances of finding someone that can help them would be significant.
That''s why I think it would be interesting/challenging to design an interface that allows the player to ask very open questions to any stranger in the street so they can go through that narrowing process.
First person you meet in town, a teenager with his mates : "Hi there, do you know guys where I can go to party in this town ?"
If you succeed your roll, they give you the name of a district where they would normally go to party. If you fail, they jsut dont know. If you fumble, they probably send you to some gangster bar where you ll probably get into a fight or worse

Of course, if you have your "hitchiker''s guide to the galaxy" handy, you could just look up "where to party" on this town and go and find out for yourself


Sancte Isidore ora pro nobis !

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