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Manip

Super Mario Land 2, Small?

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Today I have been playing Super Mario Land 2 for the Game Boy (Black and White). I was wondering, even taking into account that it is black and white how is it so small. The entire game is only 500kb in size, it contains at least 30+ monsters and traps, levels, sounds and all sorts of things. I could make a Mario animation, given in colour that would be more than 500kb so I just don''t understand how they fitted so much in so little.

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Remember that everything is a hell of a lot smaller, and the restrictions of black&white.

You say you could make a mario animation that would be > 500kb. Cool, but try making the same animation using a 2colour palette (i.e black & white), and limit yourself to 8x8 sprite or smaller. You''ll find that the size of your file will shrink a hell of a lot more with these kind of restrictions.

Additionally with these kind of restrictions applied across the board ( i.e the entire game ) it''s not suprising that the game fits into 500k.


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1) They most likely use 8bit images.
2) The animation sprites are not that big; they don''t need to be. So an 8bit 128x128 sprite bitmap is only 6kb. So if they use a compressed image format, it will be a lot smaller considering it''s black and white. Might take it down to 3.xkb.
3) There''s most likely not a lot of code. That''s in the sence of comparing it to something like HALO.

-UltimaX-
|Designing A Screen Shot System|

"You wished for a white christmas... Now go shovel your wishes!"

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Actually, the original GB uses only 2-bit images (4 possible variations of gray, from black to white).
Otherwise, UltimaX is correct.

-Nik

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quote:
Original post by Manip
I could make a Mario animation, given in colour that would be more than 500kb so I just don''t understand how they fitted so much in so little.

500kb for an animation? You must be crazy, to pick an image at random, my desktop wallpaper is only 130kb, and thats in true colour, not 4 colours. And it could easily contain all the animations for the game.

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quote:
Original post by Nik02
Actually, the original GB uses only 2-bit images (4 possible variations of gray, from black to white).


Furthermore, they''re encoded with a sort of custom RLE compression. I''m not sure on the details, but any docs on emulators should be able to give you a brief rundown of the technique used. It''s a little painful compared to straight uncompressed bitmaps, but hey, it works.

Even if it were uncompressed, three frames of running animation comes out at (8x8x4x3) 768 bits. 96 bytes. Pretty small, huh? Oh yeah, that''s sans-header. The palette and all would take up a bit of space but if you were to cram your images in 8x8 blocks into a file and store the palette only once, you could end up with pretty small graphic files. And unecessary trouble unless you have VERY rigid constraints.

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quote:
Original post by RuneLancer Pretty small, huh? Oh yeah, that''s sans-header. The palette and all would take up a bit of space but if you were to cram your images in 8x8 blocks into a file and store the palette only once,

If its anything like GBA coding, then typically data like animations have no header, they just get converted into raw data and linked as array data. And the GB only had 4 shades of grey, so you wouldn''t even need a pallette.

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The origional gameboy was pretty slick with what all it could do given it had a variation of the ANCIENT Z80 microprocessor (can you say ''trs-80 model 1''?). There are tons of gameboy emulators, assemblers, and even a c compiler around (a port of the ''c for small devices'' compiler). It could be pretty fun to play with.

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The original GB is over twelve years old - I remember it being quite advanced then. I bought one from the first batch to arrive in Finland It had Tetris to go with it; ahh, the nostalgy...

-Nik

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If you think 500kb is large for a game, check out .kkrieger. I haven''t tried it (crappy graphics card), but for a 96kb game it seems pretty darned good.

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