• Advertisement

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Sigmund Freud : Second Biggest Influence on Xenogears

This topic is 5037 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Just thought I''d share this with you guys. Of course the bible is the first major influence on this classic RPG but I would like to share information concerning this guy''s theory. Pretty interesting how the game designers look up information and study other people''s theories(for Xenosaga they studied Mizrahi''s Will To Power theory) just to design a game. http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/freud.html Which leads to my first question. Do you guys deeply study a subject before designing a game? Jehovah is viewed by Gnostics as fundamentally evil, jealous, rigid, lacking in compassion and prone to genocide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement
Freud being an influence on Xenogears, oh yeah. As I recall, it was somewhat there in FF7 as well.

As for using Freud in designing games, or any political, social, philisophic, psychological theory, I''m not sure how the gameplay can reflect it, but the story definately can. I''d think it''d actually help a lot of games out, since it gives the game a theme to work from. However, its a bit important to decide WHY you want to add this subject to the story. Is it a support, a parallel, or a criticism? Some may think that Liberalism is a big joke, so, the game you design could reflect a criticism of F.Hayek''s ideas.

If you need examples of this, read "In The Penal Colony" by Franz Kafka. Big criticism of Christianity. And to see it at play in a game, Crono Trigger (circa 11000BC) is a support of Christianity. Weird, but nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Often, there will be influences that can be tracked back through the genealongy of thought for some distance. The creators of Xenogears might not have had a copy of Freud''s complete works next to their workstations while they typed the code, but perhaps they had read Aristotle''s Nicomachean Ethics, which is a far earlier occurrance of many of the ideas Freud later, erm, "adapted" for use in psychological fields.

It''s easy to study a thinker or writer in a class and think, "Whoa! This is just like that video game I was just playing! It''s awesome that the designers of that game incorporated this thinker''s ideas into their project!" when in fact those designers have never read anything that thinker wrote. The structure of shared knowlede and philosophical tenets is a large and spooky tapestry, a seething mass of interconnected threads and fluctuating relationships. Be careful not to see any part of it too clearly. If it seems obvious that idea A is a direct descendent of idea B, you''re probably missing out on a whole lot of nuances.

[/rant]

To answer your question, I like to see a strong metaphysical basis for a game world, or a clever application of old ideas in new contexts. The Matrix was, for me, reminiscent of Plato''s allegory of the cave, and the ring from LotR seemed like Gyges'' Ring, but watered down. Gyges'' Ring was used to demonstrate the corrupting inherent in mankind, while Sauron''s actually possessed evil power, and so the allegorical value becomes literal. I like the original better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
In my opinion, studying a subject is one of the most important steps in designing a game. It doesn''t have to be a specific philosophy or some deep meaning, but there should be some inspiration and motivation.

Things a designer should study:

Actual environments: Every setting of a game is grounded in some sort of actual environment: a city, a tropical island, a forrest, a specific time period (futuristic games require more imagination) Studying different settings carefully will give you more inspiration, more accuracy (if desired), more of a feel for where and when the game is taking place.

Social Interaction: If your game has deep characters then the designer better be studying the people around them, what makes characters intriguing, attractive, repulsive, etc.

History: If the game has a theme (war, philosophy, government, etc) then the designer should be studying the history of those topics to get inspiration for parts of the games.

Characters: If the main character in the game is an animal, then study animal habits, read about them, watch the nature channel, ideas will jump out at you. This especially works for sci-fi monsters and aliens which are all some mutated combination of imagination and multiple animals.

More...

The game designer is responsible for creating the game as a whole, therefore he or she should have created a complete world down to the finest detail and possible player movement in their mind first, then translate that world into a game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
no way - the writters of xenogears knew what was going on. Sure, they might not have know all of freud beliefs, but they got the just of it, and if you think that they got it from another source that freud copied, your wrong. The ''id'' is something that was completely freudian, if in only name. Now the main character, Fei, has an id which is seperated from him (freud would call it multiple personality born from trauma) and the character in the game was named ''id'' need more evidence go ahead and ask - psych student

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you''re just talking about the basic terminology and such, then you''re no doubt right. However, it''s not so profound as you might think. I doubt they had any overriding motive to espouse Freudian psychology. Brave Fencer Musashi used historical figures and vaguely alluded to historical events, but it''s not exactly a biographical piece. Little gems of information can be found most anywhere.

I put this one about on par with the name "Persephone" in the second Matrix movie. Slightly clever, vaguely intellectual, but not particularly profound. The word "id" might be Freudian, but the concept, used as generally as Xenogears used it, is not his creation. That story would be possible without Freud''s influence, and only the word would need to change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just to give this conversation an interesting dynamic, since we seem to be split on wether or not the staff of Xenogears had read any kind of information on Freud, how about the Kabbalistic influences that Xenogears has? They''re subtle, but Krelian does refer to key concepts by name, and the whole ending/final boss scene is part of Kabbalist mythos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Advertisement