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Formulas of Final Fantasy

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I was wondering if any one could give some ideas of how stats are calculated in RPGs, such as the Final Fantasy series? Like Attack, Evade, Defense of you and your enemy, and also the amount of HP that is taken off for every hit. If anyone has any ideas please tell me.

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Most RPG systems are pretty arbitary, there isn''t really a "right" way to do it. I suggest you look at Dungeons and Dragons or some pen and paper RPG to get ideas. Stats generally aren''t calculated, but are manually entered and tweaked by designers until they are balanced.

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I know final fantasy tactics uses some formulas for dealing damage, it can be found here FFT along with a lot of other information about the battle mechanics.




[edited by - NicolasX on May 17, 2004 8:06:02 PM]

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As long as it makes sense and seems to work, then there''s nothing wrong with it. For example, if a guy with strength S hits a guy with defense D, then you might choose to deal (int)((double)S / D * randReal(0.8, 1.25)) damage, clamped to the range [1, 9999], for example. You should use a formula that increases with S and decreases with D, plus it should have randomness, and it should also not produce extreme results. In this formula, someone with a defense of 1 will be given 5 times as much damage as someone with a defense of 5, and you could be getting some absurdly high damages.

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quote:
Original post by Aprosenf
As long as it makes sense and seems to work, then there''s nothing wrong with it. For example, if a guy with strength S hits a guy with defense D, then you might choose to deal (int)((double)S / D * randReal(0.8, 1.25)) damage, clamped to the range [1, 9999], for example. You should use a formula that increases with S and decreases with D, plus it should have randomness, and it should also not produce extreme results. In this formula, someone with a defense of 1 will be given 5 times as much damage as someone with a defense of 5, and you could be getting some absurdly high damages.


I''m assuming your replying to what I said. The formulas make sense, and it''s extremely rare to do any damage over 1000 under normal circumstances (that is, by not degenerating a character so it can be releveled back up to 99). The only character that I can think of that does large amounts of damage is Orlandu, he''s the games strongest character anyway.


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I would also advise you to look at a pen & paper RPG. A quite simple system is used in Dungeons and Dragons, and it''s available on the net for free...

Here you can find the system reference document for the latest edition. It includes nearly everything you need to know to play the entire game. You should look at this part about combat basics. It''s a pretty comprehensive system.

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Either use subtraction or division for attack and defence. A/D or A-D. Your chance to hit should be Acc/Evade or Acc-Evade. This applies to most things. Just tweak the numbers how you want to. (If you use subtraction, make all negative numbers into zeros)

Edit: Also, avoid too many random numbers...

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[edited by - Nathaniel Hammen on May 20, 2004 4:35:10 PM]

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