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Oilers99

An attempt to add eloquence to a simple question.

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All right. I''m a pretty active person in the world of online forums. I know how annoying it is to deal with a newbie who asks the same question you have been fielding for years, but bear with me. I''ve been at amateur game design, from a purely conceptual viewpoint for a while now. It all started with a contest back over at Gamespot''s forums, where we were asked to submit game design documents. Since then, I have realized that what I really want to do with my life is design games. However, actually finishing a great fan project is a necessity, in my mind, to at least prove to myself that I can do this. Now this is where this board comes in, I suppose. Though I have browsed this site a bit, I have only found a bit of information. Right now, I have the fortune of knowing someone who is willing to show me the ropes, but I should also be pursuing programming based knowledge independently. This game aspires to be programmed in Visual Basic. Keep in mind, that if you throw around any programming terminology, I shall immediately go blank. I know absolutely nothing of programming, though I believe that if I get started, I shall take to it well. However, that doesn''t change the fact that I shall need very basic sources for learning. Therefore, I press you for some of the most base, and accessible information on programming, and more specifically, Visual Basic. The truth has to be out there, after all.

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It''s Oilers! :O

msdn is a great resource if you have a specific question or know what you are looking for. The homepage of Visual Basic is http://msdn.microsoft.com/vbasic/.

As for learning the basics, I personally think it''s best if you take a class (What I did) or have a friend help you. I don''t really have any for beginners resources I can give you, though.

I could be way off, but I think it''s best to get some programming theory before you go into a specific language. Have someone explain to you what variables and the different data types are, etc.

I''m sure that the more talented programmers that frequent this board will have better advice, though.

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I suggest you learn C++ instead of Visual Basic, having switched from VB to C++ myself. C++ is not that hard, but offers greater performance and tells you how things really work, unlike VB. Of course, the option is up to you. I''ve heard that VB.NET has much improved too.

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quote:
Original post by Arsene Zanetti
I suggest you learn C++ instead of Visual Basic, having switched from VB to C++ myself. C++ is not that hard, but offers greater performance and tells you how things really work, unlike VB. Of course, the option is up to you. I''ve heard that VB.NET has much improved too.


Well, I would have to get to the point where I knew what I was getting into first, wouldn''t I? But actually, I plan to use my knowledge less to become a programmer, and more to support the project, which is to run in Visual Basic. Although I don''t know the effectiveness of it compared to other languages, it is the one I shall need to know specifically for this project. If I am guessing correctly, there is information that pertains to programming in general, and information that is specific to a language. The former is the most pressing, with the basics of the later, to Visual Basic in particular, coming in after that. I presume I shall have a much easier time of pursuing additional programming knowledge independently once I have a much clearer idea of what programming is about.

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Lucky's VB Gaming tutorials are a pretty good place to learn a lot of the basics in VB, and they cover various areas. The projects deal with VB6, and most of the DirectX ones are focused on DirectX7, although there are also DirectX8 tutorials. A more general resource thats good for beginners is Gamedev.net's For Beginners section, which answers many basic questions and the like.

Start off with some smaller projects in order to learn the language properly, some common suggestions include Pong, Tetris, Snake, PacMan, etc. These may seem silly, but they use a lot of the techniques you'll be using in a larger project. Even smaller things while your learning can help - if a tutorial contains a little demonstration program, do it, it may not seem useful (and the resulting program probably isnt), but it will get you used to the functions, syntax of the language, etc.

And you can always come here to ask for help (after trying to solve a problem yourself of course, we arent here to just do things for you ) How to ask questions the smart way gives some good guidelines that many users here like to follow when posting questions, but it isnt a requirement of posting.

Some other good VB programming sites include:
DirectX4VB
VB Fibre (covers optimization, may be a little advanced at first).

quote:

I suggest you learn C++ instead of Visual Basic, having switched from VB to C++ myself. C++ is not that hard, but offers greater performance and tells you how things really work, unlike VB. Of course, the option is up to you. I've heard that VB.NET has much improved too.



A well written VB program can perform quite well, almost as well as an equivalent C++ program in fact. Many VB programs ARENT written all that well, and until recent versions VB was lacking some important things such as support for use of DirectX, which gives it its bad reputation. By all means learn C++ if you'd like, it IS more powerful and flexible, but VB is also perfectly acceptible.

Hope that helps - have fun developing some cool games!


//EDIT: added some more info


[edited by - kazgoroth on May 26, 2004 3:49:17 AM]

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