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PPCThug

help with Debian linux

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I downloaded the first two cd iso''s for debian linux so I could see what linux is all about, ok stupid question, how do I burn the iso files onto a couple of discs? I''ve done plenty of burning with both nti cd maker 2000 plus which came with my cd-rw and cd cloner which I got recently but I never burned an iso untill now. both programs seem to have theyre own cd image format and don''t seem to see the .iso files. and while I''m at it I might as well ask if debian linux can install on a ntsf file format partishion
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If your software can''t burn iso''s then there''s other software out there that can. Nero comes to mind.

quote:
Original post by PPCThug
and while I''m at it I might as well ask if debian linux can install on a ntsf file format partishion

Oh dear... I''d say you''re in for a real treat...

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Linux cannot be installed on an NTFS partition, Linux systems normally require atleast 3 partitions, a /boot partition, a swap partition and a / partition. You can choose which filesystem(Ext2, Ext3, ReiserFS, JFS etc.) to use for both the /boot partition and / partition. You need to figure out which filesystems best suits your needs and then use them.

For my Gentoo installation I use Ext3 as my /boot filesystem and ReiserFS as my / filesystem.

Also, make sure that when you compile the kernel you COMPILE IN support for the filesystems you are using and not load them as modules, otherwise you will get kernel panic error messages when booting up and the system will fail to load.

EDIT: I've never used Debian before so I'm not sure whether you need to compile the kernel manually or if it does it for you, if it does it for you then you can just disregard my last paragraph.

[edited by - template on May 26, 2004 5:18:44 PM]

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quote:
Original post by template
Linux cannot be installed on an NTFS partition, Linux systems normally require atleast 3 partitions, a /boot partition, a swap partition and a / partition. You can choose which filesystem(ext2, ext3, reiserfs, jfs etc.) to use for both the /boot partition and / partition. You need to figure out which filesystems best suits your needs and then use them.

Depends on how old the distribution/your hardware is.

Old hardware + old distro needs 3
New hardware + old distro needs 2 (no 1024 cylinder problems)
New hardware + new distro needs 1 (no swap file problems)

old hardware + new distro is jsut wrong. ;-) okay okay, 2. (just the 1024 problem)

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quote:
Original post by zer0wolf
The age of the distro has nothing to do with it, it has has to do with how much of a "holding your hands" sort of distro it is.


linux 2.6 has the capacity to do swap files without performance problems. Previous kernels do not.

Newer distributions have linux 2.6 kernels. Previous distros do not.

[edited by - C-Junkie on May 26, 2004 6:29:07 PM]

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quote:
Original post by C-Junkie
New hardware + new distro needs 1 (no swap file problems)



Although you can work with a swap file, it''s not recommended for a good reason. If you have a swap partition, the system doesn''t need to go through the file system. Essentially, it''s one less HDD seek when accessing the already slow disk (remember, when memory gets full, the swap file entry might be displaced from the FS cache).

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quote:
Original post by C-Junkie
quote:
Original post by zer0wolf
The age of the distro has nothing to do with it, it has has to do with how much of a "holding your hands" sort of distro it is.


linux 2.6 has the capacity to do swap files without performance problems. Previous kernels do not.

Newer distributions have linux 2.6 kernels. Previous distros do not.

Old releases of old distros don't have the 2.6 kernel. New releases of old distros do. Distros like Gentoo and Debian give you full reign on what kernel you use.


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[edited by - zer0wolf on May 26, 2004 6:56:53 PM]

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my pc specs are

amd athlon xp 2400
fic radeon 9500 pro
asus a7n8x
2x 512MB 333 ddr ram
western digital 100 gig hard drive, ntfs file system, five partitions 20 gigs each/
win2k pro

the guy writing the beginners course on linux kept saying that you can do anything on linux that you could do on windows,
most of what I do on windows is playing direct x games, some recent ones are direct x 9, like unreal 2, deus ex invisible war, home world 2, and I hope to get half life 2 when it gets out
I didn''t think linux could run direct x games, I heard about a lin-X? a couple of years ago which could supposedly emulate direct x 6 I think, what ever happened to that?

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