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Unnoobish N00b

Is C++ useful for hobbyists?

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Whenever someone asks what language to use it''s almost C++ and the reason most of the time is because you''re going to have to learn it anyways if you plan on working in the industry. I know C++ but haven''t used it in a few months. I''ve been using Java but too slow since I plan to make a graphics intensive games but I want to be more productive so I don''t know. There must be some reason other than you have to learn it for this and that, right? You can skip this part, it''s only why I don''t want to use C++ for that purpose. ********* Is there a reason to use C++ if you don''t plan on going into the game programming industry, I certainly want to but it seems according to post around here your pay is extremely low and there won''t be much more of a industry where I live(the US) in the future. I won''t mind business program and I think system programming is seems like all types of computer engineering/software programming jobs are going to be rare in teh future and hard to get. And even if you can get one it will be low pay. ******** So there''s my reason for wanting to konw why C++ is a good choice for hobbyist. I''m mainly intrested in a productive language that I can easily distribute. And ins''t too hard, I know age doesn''t matter but I''m only 14 and haven''t dwelled too far out of the math I"m learning in school. But a lot of C++ game programming tutorials seems to need linear algebra(not from experience but from article and posts and such), even though I plan to do 2D only. So is C++ the right choice for me if I don''t plan on going into hte game dev industry? What is more productive, C++ or another language? Any help is appreciated.

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quote:
I know C++ but haven''t used it in a few months.


Really?

Use whatever language you want. It really doesn''t matter on a 1+ Ghz computer.

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Productivity is more based on how proficient someone is with a particular language than the language itself (unless you''re programming in something silly.. like cobol). The bottom line is to use the language that fits you. I enjoy C++ because it has excellent flexibility (and compatibility), is relatively simple, and has an unbelievable amount of learning resources available.

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Well didn't want to have to make a reference counter or any smart pointer type thing and have to deal with memory evertime. Causing less time spent on the main objective.

Is it frowned upon to use libraries like Boost? If i wanted to use STL containers, will I have to add both of them(can I even do that?) or does something like Boost already have them.

Does it make it too slow say to mix boost and SDL or whatever API I use?



[edited by - Unnoobish N00b on May 28, 2004 7:05:34 PM]

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If you''re not going into the game industry, and you''re not planning on writing Doom 10 in your parents basement, I see little point in messing with C++.

Use some language that allows you to focus on the problem rather than on the minutiae of the implementation. There are lots to choose from.

/me refrains from commenting on the "c++ is simple" statement.

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quote:
Original post by Unnoobish N00b
Well didn''t want to have to make a reference counter or any smart pointer type thing and have to deal with memory evertime. Causing less time spent on the main objective.


Er, what? C#, Java, Lisp, Python etc... would help with this.
Garbage collectors do exist for C++, but they are not as robust as ones disigned into other languages. C++ with Managed Extentions (C++.Net) has a good garbage collector, but this is a new language not C++; it only works with .Net.

C++ requires you to use reference counters and smart-pointers to write reliable code (that is exception safe and thread safe).

quote:

Is it frowned upon to use libraries like Boost?


No, quite the opposite. It shows you are familar with the tools available to the C++ community.

quote:

If i wanted to use STL containers, will I have to add both of them(can I even do that?) or does something like Boost already have them.


Yes, you can and should use both. Boost has additional containers that augment the STL.

quote:

Does it make it too slow say to mix boost and SDL or whatever API I use?


No.


In the case you wouldn''t want to use the STL nor boost, you wouldn''t want to use much of C++ - it''s a better candidate for C; e.g. drivers and code for micro-controllers.

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Thanks for the replies.

Well seeing as I already tried Java. I might look into the other languages listed. Python seems to be popular and if I decide to use C++ again I may use it with C++. Though if there aren''t actually too many hinderances with using the multiple libraries I may stay with C++.

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I would recomend you to start of with Python. So you can learn think logical without mess with memory managerment and so on. When you feel confortable with Python you maybe want to go for C++ or stay to Python.

http://www.cis.gsu.edu/~shong/oojokes/

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What do you recommend again? Don''t think he got it the first three times...

I like C#. It''s more addicting than crack cocaine.

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quote:
Original post by Arild Fines
/me refrains from commenting on the "c++ is simple" statement.


Talk for yourself.

Anything is simple once you live and breath it.

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