Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

To change careers?

This topic is 4945 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

I''m currently a network engineer for a large telecom company in the U.S. - we all know that field is less than steller at the moment. I have been playing games since I can remember - since the old Atari 2600. I am currently going to school to get my B.S. degree in Computer Science - I plan on a masters as well. I know everyone in their brother would like to get in the gaming industry, but I know its a lot of hard work and many hours. Its not nearly as glamorous as many may think. However, in lieu of my present field going down the tubes, I would like opinions about the future of game programming in the U.S. Someone recently told me they saw an article indicating that the game industry will supercede the Hollywood movie income by 2010 - I cannot seem to locate that article. It looks good from the outside looking in, but with those of you that have been looking in the game business for a while now, what do you think/feel? Thanks....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The game industry already surpasses box office sales, but that''s beside the point; how much money *YOU* make is going to be another story all together.

How much did the Key Grip for The Matrix make? Probably a lot less than Keanu Reeves.

Most of the money goes to people wearing suits, not people in front of computers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Last I heard, the gaming industry was already larger than the movie industry. I, too, lost the article, but if you think that most software (games and regular applications) these days is about $40 - $50 new, including console games (very popular), in addition to the fact that everyone these days has at least a single console system (several hundred dollars), it quickly adds up. It can easily overshadow the less than $10 you pay per person to see a movie, even if you include other areas like concessions, merchandise, VHS/DVD sales, etc.

And the gaming industry is growing. Unlike a lot of other hightech fields, game development is more difficult to outsource because of the extremely close contact and communication a development team needs to maintain. Game development is such an interactive and tightly nit process that you need that instantaneous ability to change direction or communicate new ideas. There''s also a lot of project management involved for a game to get done well and on time, and that works more effectively when everyone is together as well.

Speaking about growth, Electronic Arts recently consolidated several of their studios into a massive complex at Playa Vista, California, and they''re getting ready to go on an aggressive hiring campaign over the next few years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by zapper23
Actually Etnu, aside from the producers of the games, the main pay goes to the lead programmers.


who also arnt in front of the computer the title lead programmer is misleading. They dont program all that much their not (usully) like john carmack.

[edited by - wannabe 1337 on May 30, 2004 1:08:39 PM]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Outsourcing will never happen in the game industry; games are art. You might outsource, say, a physics engine implementation (or rather just buy one) or a graphics engine, but you wouldn''t outsource your story writers or whatnot.

Hence, there will always be a need for top tech talent in the game industry. The question that remains is how many of those posititions will be available in the years to come.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:

Actually Etnu, aside from the producers of the games, the main pay goes to the lead programmers.



Programmers can get paid a lot, but if you think "the main pay" from, say, EA sports titles, is going to ANYONE other than the shareholders ultimately, you''re kidding yourself.

Game studios that work independently, and then just pay a company to publish them (similiar to independent film studios who sacrafice some of their profits to the distributor) may rake in more cash, but generally speaking, the pay distribution is similiar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Where to start...

The game industry goes through its own cycles. The last few years have not been good for people looking for jobs in the game industry, though it is better now than a year ago.

The comparisons between the size of the video game industry and the size of the movie industry don''t mean a lot. People quote numbers without knowing what is actually being counted.

Among the non-upper-management types, programmers are generally paid the most. However, keep in mind that programmers in the game industry are paid much less than programmers in other industries.

Outsourcing is a reality of the game industry, too. It is already happening, though sometimes it is hard to make a distinction because the video game industry is an international industry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My biggest concern is that I spend all this time getting my CS degree and then cannot use it. Are pretty much all other programming jobs (not including gaming) moving overseas to Asia? The IT industry is being killed by outsourcing.

I really hope the government passes some laws to make it less attractive for companies to outsource. Its getting pretty ridiculous. I was recently informed that the HP CEO stated they were moving alot of jobs overseas because there was a scarcity of knowledgeable engineers in the U.S. I, like the person who informed me, are now boycotting HP - too bad I still have to buy their ink for my printer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Buy an Epson printer, my mom works there

The US game industry better still be alive and kicking in 7 years, or else there''s going to be a lot of rampaging going on *angry eyes*!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There isn''t a "lack of engineers" in the U.S. If that were the case, there wouldn''t be such a high unemployment rate among programmers.

It''s "lack of engineers who are willing to work for $500 a month with no benefits and no job security".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quote:
Original post by Etnu
There isn''t a "lack of engineers" in the U.S. If that were the case, there wouldn''t be such a high unemployment rate among programmers.

It''s "lack of engineers who are willing to work for $500 a month with no benefits and no job security".


I agree...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites