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Getting the rhythm right

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I thought I wasn''t bad at playing the piano, but I can''t successfully play a song with good ryhthm onto my computer through a MIDI keyboard. Whenever I look at the score, I see that I went off by small amounts in various places, making the whole thing look kind of crazy with dotted notes and crazy ties. And the metronome just confuses me. However, I find it very annoying entering notes by hand. Is there some way you can give "hints" to the expected rhythm with the program adjusting to that? BTW, I use Anvil Studio (though I''d actually rather use something made for linux, I just never looked around too much), and this is just a minor hobby so I''m not willing to buy any commercial software. Zorx (a Puzzle Bobble clone) Discontinuity (an animation system for POV-Ray)

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You don''t want a quantised performance; you want a natural performance full of discrepancies. If you go through and fix everything, or enter it by hand, then the performance will sound unnatural and mechanistic.

Some people spend hours going through their tracks putting in lots of little "mistakes" to make the parts sound authentic...

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yeah i have that when i want to print out the score. in logic (i know for sure) there is a function that allows you to turn it into a more readable score. but i use cubase now and not touched logic for a number of years, in fact ive not done this for a loing time but im sure there is a function in the score that will let you get rid of cazy dotted nots and crazy hemi semi demi quavers. ill have a play around in cubase in a bit and see if i can find out what the option is.

if you quantise your music afterwards tyhat sorts most of the problems out but you dont get the live feel and it lines up the notes to the snap you set it at. setting the snap to anything more than 16 will be ok but it still means you get crazy looking scores

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Is there no option to do some sort of partial quantizing... ie. moving notes part of the way towards the bar/note/beat boundary, and better still, only moving those which are a certain distance away?

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I was using Anvil Studio but now I'm looking for good software for Linux. Not that I'm even sure the MIDI works in Linux on my system, but...

edit: I'm getting Rosegarden. Looks pretty good and it has export supported for CSound and LilyPond, both which I have played with and am impressed with.
edit2: I just realized that it requires KDE, which I don't have installed. It would take me a long time to install because I use LFS, with which its hard to install anything. But it might be worth it.

Zorx (a Puzzle Bobble clone)
Discontinuity (an animation system for POV-Ray)

[edited by - clum on June 1, 2004 12:49:42 PM]

[edited by - clum on June 1, 2004 12:53:36 PM]

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Actually, contrary to what an earlier poster mentioned, quantization IS the solution to fixing minor rhythm problems. You do want very "human" sound, but this doesn''t mean human rhythm errors are acceptable. As an experienced pianist, I can tell when someone changes the rhythm of a piece during a performance for effect, or because they actually made a mistake.

Simply experiment with different quantizations (I think that''s a word). In FLStudio, I would quantize a recorded performance to 1/4 steps, or at most, 1/2 steps.

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Generally you quantize to a resolution...16th note works well for slower pieces, 32nd for faster ones (unless they have lots of insanle fast parts).

As pointed out, this makes your playing pretty mechanistic. It''s generally used for writing a synth part or bass or something which has a very rigid rhythm, but when you can''t be bothered to show such high accuracy on those.

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