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sirSolarius

Visual Studio .NET 2003 vs. MSVC 6

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I have the opportunity to get VS .NET for $100 from a student license, but I already have MSVC 6 enterprise... is it worth upgrading? Sorry if this is the wrong forum, but I didn''t know where to put this.

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IMHO, if you are going to stick with C++ there is no compelling reason to upgrade. If you want to do .NET, you need VS .NET.

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definetly upgrade. The optimising compiler may be free, but VS.net''s debugger for said compiler makes it worth it. Also it''ll give you an oppurtunity to have a look at C# and vb.net.

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quote:
Original post by jeeky
IMHO, if you are going to stick with C++ there is no compelling reason to upgrade. If you want to do .NET, you need VS .NET.


Are you kidding? VS6''s C++ support is pitiful. Things have changed quite a bit in five years.

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quote:
Original post by sirSolarius
And I can just open up my existing VC6 code in the .NET compiler, and it''ll work with full optimizations and everything?

Well, it defaults to managed extensions (i.e. using the .NET framework). But once you turn it off, your code is good to go. Since .NET is more standards compliant you might have to change a few non-compliant things in your code. But for the most part, its a painless process.

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quote:
Original post by Zipster
Well, it defaults to managed extensions (i.e. using the .NET framework). But once you turn it off, your code is good to go. Since .NET is more standards compliant you might have to change a few non-compliant things in your code. But for the most part, its a painless process.


Eek! Is it painless to turn off the managed extensions, or is that another big process?

And where can I find a list of compliance changes between MSVC 6 and .NET?

Thanks much everyone, I''m very seriously considering the upgrade now.

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The quirks of MSVC6 are definitely a pain (like how VC6 will put a for loop variable outside the scope of the for loop, arg). But, the company I''m working at now still uses VC6, and we''ve decided that the benefits to upgrading to 7 still don''t outweigh the hassle it would be to update all our projects and potentially fixing incompatibilities with our (rather complicated) build system. If there was something substantial that we would gain from switching to 7, then we would- but I think most of the benefits of going to 6 to 7 are somewhat superficial. So, for you being a student (and $100 is a lot of money for a student), you might want to make the same decision and just stick with 6.

Of course, if you want .NET support, then the discussion is moot.

Anyway, here''s my list of advantages to 7:
- better language support (like that for-loop variable scope thing I mentioned)
- much much better support for C++ templates
- project file is in XML format, and is really easy to edit with a text editor (the VC6 project file is actually in text format too, but it''s an ugly mess)
- better support for multiple projects per "workspace" (called "solution" in 7). Personally, all the things that I work with are one project per workspace, so this doesn''t affect me.

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quote:
Original post by Zipster
quote:
Original post by sirSolarius
And I can just open up my existing VC6 code in the .NET compiler, and it''ll work with full optimizations and everything?

Well, it defaults to managed extensions (i.e. using the .NET framework).

No it doesn''t.

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