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CProgrammer

laptop and microsofts progress

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I want to buy a laptop this summer, however since Windows Longhorn will come out 2005 i''m not so sure anymore. Is it really smart to buy a laptop designed for WinXP now? You guys think I could easily buy longhorn when it comes out reformat and install that. Will it run fine? Any comments? -CProgrammer

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who says longhorn is coming out in 2005?
that'd be next year?
no it's not coming out till 2006 at least cuz i got the latest version and it's still called a prerelease version not even beta!
If u really need a laptop just figure out what you need one for first if not just get a damn apple powerbook and you'll never regret it!
I've had my titanium powerbook for almost 2 years now and still like it better than any pc laptop I've come across!


If God played dice, He'd win.
—Ian Stewart, Does God Play Dice? The Mathematics of Chaos

[edited by - daveangel on June 3, 2004 9:23:12 PM]

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If you buy a half decent laptop you should have no trouble running Longhorn on it when it comes out.

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quote from Microsoft-Watch

"Microsoft is expected to recommend that the "average" Longhorn PC feature a dual-core CPU running at 4 to 6GHz; a minimum of 2 gigs of RAM; up to a terabyte of storage; a 1 Gbit, built-in, Ethernet-wired port and an 802.11g wireless link; and a graphics processor that runs three times faster than those on the market today."

http://www.microsoft-watch.com/article2/0,1995,1581842,00.asp

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quote:
Original post by AceroSBU
quote from Microsoft-Watch

"Microsoft is expected to recommend that the "average" Longhorn PC feature a dual-core CPU running at 4 to 6GHz; a minimum of 2 gigs of RAM; up to a terabyte of storage; a 1 Gbit, built-in, Ethernet-wired port and an 802.11g wireless link; and a graphics processor that runs three times faster than those on the market today."

http://www.microsoft-watch.com/article2/0,1995,1581842,00.asp


you forgot your [MassiveExaggerationFromEntirelyAnonamouseAnitMicrosoftSource][/MassiveExaggerationFromEntirelyAnonamouseAnitMicrosoftSource] tags on that one

[edited by - Mulligan on June 3, 2004 11:57:50 PM]

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Hey, I''m a MS Supporter and perfectly willing to admit that they are exaggerating, but I don''t find those requirments to be excessive. By late 2005 early 2006 a gig or two of ram and 4ghz CPUs with a dual core (something the current Pentium-M2''s are supposed to have now or in the near future if I remeber correctly) are certainly not out of the question. The only thing that really seems overboard is a terabye of HD space.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Got to hate when the OS alone hogs: "graphics processor that runs three times faster than those on the market today". I''d hate to see windowed mode games on that OS.

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Processing power is not going to double in the next 2 years on average.

Hard drive space is not going to quadruple.

RAM is not going to double.

Bullshit figures.

the video card figures are complete and utter nonsense.

My guess?

Microsoft makes software for the "average" user. The average user can not afford what will likely be the extreme high end in 2 years time.

Processing speed in 2002: 2Ghz max.
RAM for (reasonable) computers in 2002: 256MB
video card memory in 2002: 128MB

Today we have 3.4Ghz chips, 512MB of ram, and 256MB video cards.

With those increases, and the extreme difficulty that chip manufacturers have been having with new production processes, I have an EXTREMELY hard time believing that we''ll outdo that within the next 2 years.

More likely setup:
2-3Ghz chip.
512MB-1GB RAM.
10GB hard drive space (assuming windows takes up 2-3GB at max, about a 75-100% increase over windows XP when you factor in the driver database, the cabinet files, etc.) Hard drive space has never been an issue.

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Since you can pre-release-test Longhorn today, I doubt it will require anything near those figures. Look at the Windows XP requirements:
- PC with 300 megahertz or higher processor clock speed recommended; 233 MHz minimum required (single or dual processor system);* Intel Pentium/Celeron family, or AMD K6/Athlon/Duron family, or compatible processor recommended
- 128 megabytes (MB) of RAM or higher recommended (64 MB minimum supported; may limit performance and some features)
- 1.5 gigabytes (GB) of available hard disk space*
- Super VGA (800x600) or higher-resolution video adapter and monitor
- CD-ROM or DVD drive
- Keyboard and Microsoft Mouse or compatible pointing device

Maybe double that, at the most. How can an operating system that draws a couple of windows on the screen require a graphics card? What would Microsoft put in 1 terrabyte of hard-drive space if even Encarta Encyclopedia is a few gigabytes? The requirements cited there are ridiculous. You also have to remember that the majority of computer users don't have 2 GHz CPU's even now, because they only use them to run their office apps and internet browsers.

Their objective is to get Longhorn on as many PC's as possible, and thus make a few hundred more dollars off each Windows user. That and probably some sort of restrictive licensing system for a "new model of computing".

[edited by - Matei on June 4, 2004 7:00:48 PM]

[edited by - Matei on June 4, 2004 7:02:31 PM]

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