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No game project is a failure

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Unless all you do is create an empty project, none of your programming attmpts have failed. Hear me out. I start a new project about every week. I could sit down and make a game start to finish, but I rarely do. And here is why, I don''t code to make a game. I code to learn. Was your first porgram that loaded a bitmap a funtional game? No. Was it an attempt to make a game? Probably. The one thing that stands in my way of making a great game is that I don''t have the motivation. I have the skills, the goal isn''t too high, but it would feel alot easier if I were being paid to do it. So my message to all of you is to keep failing, but only as long as you learn while failing. Just as long as you add a new working feature, feel free to fail. wow its late...

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I agree with just about everything except that it''s easier if you are getting paid.

IMO the easiest programming is what I do for myself for my own personal project. It isn''t any easier for me at least if I''m writing code for someone else.

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I agree with DrEvil. Getting payed to do it takes all the fun out of it :-( If you do it as a hobby for yourself, you get to be your own boss :-)

But basically i agree. However, doing an entire project start to finish teaches you things as well. There are some things that will make a game so much better if implemented but that are absolutely painfull to program (*cough* networking *cough*). If you never stick the project out, including the boring bits, you''ll never get a broader scope and will never get experience in some areas you may be unfamilar with.

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If I get paid for it, it is something I can do very well.
If I do it for free, it is something I love to do.

None is easier than the other. The first pays with money, the second pays with fun and self-esteem.

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There are some things where even getting paid does not make them feel worth the time. Every year I decide to do a programming project that seems like it''s out of my ability. In high school I would sign up to present the project at the science fair and now I sign up to present at the undergrad symposium at college so I have a date to work towards. Even though what I work through is only about an 8 month cycle. It gets VERY difficult towards the end when you are bored of looking at the same stuff and you just want to get it done and out the door.
I remember reading how developers want to see projects that show you have the ability to stick to a project and it seemed so trivial and easy to work on something for extended periods. I only really understood what that meant when my project cycles started to move beyond 3 months. I''m sure someone here with real world industry experience can vouch for me that long projects are difficult. I''ve even read that they look for experience that shows that you have that ability to work on projects with long product cycles when hiring.

~Wave

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Guest Anonymous Poster
I disagree. Most game projects are utter failures. You may learn something along the way, but if you set out to do something and fail to do it, well...you''ve failed. There''s nothing wrong with that, but you can''t pretend it was a success.

Also, you haven''t truly learned something until you have finished it. You''ll learn more finishing off that "last 10%" then you think.

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quote:
Original post by Anonymous Poster
I disagree. Most game projects are utter failures. You may learn something along the way, but if you set out to do something and fail to do it, well...you''ve failed. There''s nothing wrong with that, but you can''t pretend it was a success.

Also, you haven''t truly learned something until you have finished it. You''ll learn more finishing off that "last 10%" then you think.


Atleast one learns the cause of the failure and try to avoid it in future. So a failed project becomes the cause of success of a future project so it is not a "FINAL" failure.

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