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Tiwanacu

Future Of Game Programming

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I don''t think anyone would disagree with me if I said the current best choice for developing games for Windows is C++ and DirectX. My question is where is the future going? There are so many changes in the future of programming what is going to be the best choice in the future. There are so many options right now. dotNet Java What does the future hold? I read that all development for Windows by 2007 will be in dotNet. Is dotNet with DirectX suitable for game development? Is if fast enough? If it is not then what will a developer use? Will C++ ever become unsupported for Windows? Let me know what you think. I would love to get some idea of what game developers see as the future for game development.

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im using c++ and directx, but im now thinking i should of went with opengl, i rather the multiplatform idea,

I believe there are more resoruces on opengl and other utilities for input detection, sound, and theres winsock whichi think i will learn over directplay

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"I don''t think anyone would disagree with me if I said the current best choice for developing games for Windows is C++ and DirectX."

I disagree.

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Well, right now it is where all the money is. Most families run Windows systems. Crossplatform is nice, but just about every game we see on the shelves that''s worth a damn comes packed with DirectX.

What''s nice (and hope-inspiring) is that there have been games (though very few) that offer the user the option of either using DirectX or OpenGL. If the future of game-programming depends on people like us, who appreciate Linux and tolerate Windows, maybe we''ll come to a point where we''re coding games to work with either DirectX or OpenGL, so we get the best in people-pleasing crossplatform.

Or maybe Nintendo will come out with the next best thing and we''ll all switch to platform development.

=) I''m not holding my breath. For now I''ll study DX and get to OpenGL when I can.

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This may start a bit of a heated discussion, but I really beleive that within the next 5 years you will see a big shift towards linux using OpenGL as the 3D API, and possible SDL for everything else.

As more people start using linux, the games will have to follow. With nVidia and ATI supporting linux with good drivers there is no reason not to make games for it.

That said, right now my engine (or start of) was made in windows... however I am currently learning more about linux programming, and makefiles so I will be swithing to linux full time for programming. I will also make sure what ever I make will run in windows.

Anyone else agree with me on this?

Mike

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quote:
Original post by mrhodes

Anyone else agree with me on this?

Mike


Yes and no,

Yes, because a larger userbase may result in the belief that a large number of profit will be received by doing so, but no, because there are so many flavors of Linux, and to release binary distros for them all, (they wouldn''t release the source code with makefiles), would be way too much effort for the amount of additional revenue (testing, hardware profiles, etc).

~Graham

----
while (your_engine >= my_engine)
my_engine++;

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It uses DirectDraw, and only has a 3D layer when using OpenGL.

~Graham

----
while (your_engine >= my_engine)
my_engine++;

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I don''t think that developers are likely to move away from C++ any time soon ; C# is nice in some respects, but it is not currently a viable option even for PC-Windows-only games, and not available on any consoles (X-Box?).

X-Box 2 will presumably have .NET framework (or parts of it anyway) built-in, so it will be possible to write games using Managed DirectX, but I imagine some houses will continue to use C++

They almost certainly share a lot of code between different platforms, and different games - they are aimed at different devices and different types of game - the houses are going to want to be able to reuse libraries, tools, and developer expertise.

As far as rendering is concerned, this is really a no-brainer, because the houses always rewrite the rendering core for each game / platform anyway to get the most out of the hardware.

Mark

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Languages such as Java and C# are certainly the future. From a professional standpoint, the benefits afforded from using them in a large team are huge. It''s not going to be too much longer before they hit mainstream in the games industry (relatively speaking).

As for platforms, I don''t see Linux ever becoming a viable gaming platform until the community starts to encompass more mainstream gamers. The commercial Linux game market is tiny. There have been several games released on Linux over the past few years with a very low return on investment. I tend to agree with the opinion that those who use Linux as a primary desktop system are not the type of people who buy games. The most common excuse is that they are open source zealots, and while I''m sure that''s true to some extent I think the real reason lies in another direction.

The Mac, on the otherhand, has proven to be a viable market for indies. Take some time to do some research and you will find that most multiplatform indie titles get an equal (or near enough) share of sales on Mac as on Windows. I expect that the market for Mac games will grow, even if Apple''s share of the desktop market lags behind Linux. It''s a different crowd, and a large number are willing to pay for good games.

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