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Ok you may have heard this many times before. I am a major noob with C++ and computer programming but i want to learn. What would i start with ?

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quote:
Original post by KazukiKazama
Ok you may have heard this many times before. I am a major noob with C++ and computer programming but i want to learn. What would i start with ?



Go to your a bookstore and find a book you like on the subject. If you don't already have one, get a compiler. You can use Dev-C++. It's a fairly nice IDE and it comes with MinGW (Windows port of gcc). You can also use it with Cygwin (Another Windows port of gcc) if you want. Borland has a commandline version of their compiler avaliable for free. If all else fails you pay for Microsoft's compiler.

You might also consider taking a class.

Other my disagree with me, but I don't see any reason why you can't learn C or C++ as your first programming language.

[edited by - prh99 on June 9, 2004 5:49:52 PM]

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Microsoft also has a free version of their VC++ compiler and more: click

quote:
Other my disagree with me, but I don't see any reason why you can't learn C or C++ as your first programming language.


This varies from person to person, i first learned some QBasic and later on Basic and i think that was the right way for me, this because C or C++ was probably far too complicated for me at the time (i was like 12 years old). I stopped programming for some time and a while ago i decided to learn C++ and it's really a matter of time for me to really understand things (sometimes i look at some code i really didn't understand a month ago and i just fully understand it). If you find C++ too difficult (don't give up early) you might want to try Visual Basic or something.

[edited by - Tree Penguin on June 10, 2004 5:27:56 AM]

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I think it''s more difficult to switch languages than to begin with one more complicated. Start with C++, but don''t concern yourself with the more complicated peices. Make sure you understand WHY you need something before you begin to understand it. If you don''t think it''s absolutely necessary, skip to the next subject.

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I''m agreeing with Tree Penguin here. Way back when I had a windows 3.1 computer with QBASIC already loaded into DOS, I spent most of my time programming on it. Very good for a beginners language and there''s a ton of reference material on it (although little of it is less than 5 years old). I wouldn''t start out with C++ just because the learning curve is so high. Starting out a completely new language is hard; Right now I''m trying to learn MySQL and PHP on the fly for my page and find simple tasks such as a hit counter to take hours of my time. Good luck though.

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This forum is focused on math & physics, not programming in general or C++. Therefore, I''m moving this thread to the general programming forum.

Graham Rhodes
Principal Scientist
Applied Research Associates, Inc.

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quote:
Original post by Jiia
I think it''s more difficult to switch languages than to begin with one more complicated.


I would have to disagree. C++ has many inherent traps that can catch new programmers and discourage them from learning the language further. Starting with a language like Java which uses an extremely similar syntax but removes some of the tougher parts of C++ can be a good idea. Plus, I''m never one to discourage exposure to a whole plethora of languages. Learning to do the basics in many languages will only help make you a well-rounded programmer.

As for introductory C++ books...well the subject has probably been discussed to death here, but I have found 2 very good: Bruce Eckel''s Thinking in C++ (available free online) and Cay Horstman''s Big C++.

Scott.

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I started with C and then moved on to C++. It took many years before I acquired any sort of "mastery" of the language. Given that C++ and Java are so prevalent today, I would recommend learning one of those - it''s extremely easy to transition between the two (Java is probably the more newbie friendly since it lacks pointers).

I do not believe that it is difficult at all to transition between programming languages, so long as you make an effort to distinguish between programming concepts and language concepts. In other words, it is important that you understand inheritance and then that you understand C++ classes, or that you understand looping and then understand the ''for'' loop.

A good book will make an effort to explain to you certain general programming concepts that are applicable under any language, and then will go about showing you how to write the code in C++. Go to your local book store and browse through the programming section. A book like "The C++ Programming Language" is probably a bad pick at your level, because its purpose is to explain C++, not programming in general (which is far far more important). I''m sorry to say that I don''t have any specific book suggestions offhand, as I haven''t looked for that type of book in quite some time. But look for a book that recognizes the distinction between the language and the concepts.

A good foundation of knowledge in programming is worth far more than quickly learning a specific language. Another poster commented on how difficult it was to learn PHP after learning C++, which is always the case if you don''t have a good deal of fundamental understanding. I recently had to write a full fledged administration toolset for a website in PHP and MySQL and did it in 2-3 weeks with no prior experience using either one (It was about 4,000 lines of code when completed). But I had a very solid understanding of programming in general, so the learning curve was not very steep. Getting used to the syntax of a language has a relatively SMALL learning curve, if you''ve already got your fundamentals down.

So, to answer your question, look for a book that does a good job explaining *programming*, not just C++. Go to your bookstore and spend a few hours browsing around.

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i started on c++,

i would recoment that you get a book on the basics. when you lean that go on to object orientated programing in c++.

thats how i have done it. and how it is taught in the uni.

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