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bioagentX

What to do

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I'm in a predicament where I want to start programming games, in particularly reading Lamothe's famous Tricks book. I'm currently reading C++ from a school textbook, and to be honest, I've gotten really sick of it. Since it's a school textbook, the authors created a lot of their own classes and objects instead of using ANSI standard ones, (i.e: their own string class). The book tends to be structured like so: Programming info review problems case study Excercises Up to this point, I did all the review problems to help solidify my knowledge of programming. However, I'm getting tired of these problems since they're all pretty similar and have no other purpose other than to rienforce the material. My question is: "Do you think it would be better if I just learned the programming concepts through applications I made on my own or games, or should I stick with these review problems and put off the game programming for a little while?" Thanks for any reply, --BioX [edited by - BioagentX on June 9, 2004 10:17:16 PM] [edited by - BioagentX on June 9, 2004 10:18:22 PM]

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Is there any reason why you can''t do both? You should obviously continue to do the problems from the text book but I don''t see any reason why you cant experiment with games in your spare time.

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I don''t know, I never really thought of it like that. The way I thought of it was that I was reading this C++ book so I would be relatively prepared for other books. I guess I just like to complete things before moving on. But now that you mention it, I think I might consider doing that.

Thanks for your reply.

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If you have limited knowledge of your chosen language, you can still create "games". I think my first game was a magic 8-ball type thing, the user entered a question and the program generated a random response my program became more and more complicated until I realised that I had advanced enough to create slightly bigger and better things.

You don't need to shell out for other books just yet, you can simply apply the knowledge that you have already obtained, games don't have to be heavily graphical and complicated and even though learning from a text book is very educational, it can only teach you so much. Putting what you've learned to practical use is what really drives it home.

You seem serious about this so I'm sure you'll do extremely well.

[edited by - tiffany_smith on June 9, 2004 11:10:05 PM]

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