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RobD122

What to do next?

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I''m sure this was posted before however after searching for a while I couldn''t find it. I think I have a pretty good grasp at the basics of C++ after learning as much as I can online about console applications. I finished making a working hangman game in the console. So now I''m left with what to do next. I was planning on heading towards Win32 and picking up that book by Charles Petzold to learn that. The only thing is that I was wondering if I should be doing that as the next step to game programming or if I should go in another direction. Any suggestions will be appreciated.

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I think that the easiest environment for someone new at game programming (espicially someone used to console programming) is a combination of SDL and OpenGL. OpenGL handles all the graphics and SDL handles all that ugly Windows stuff and input and sound and basically anthing OS specific besides graphics (it can actually do graphics, too, but not nearly as well as OpenGL). Look at NeHE's OpenGL tutorials and SDL's website for more information.

Zorx (a Puzzle Bobble clone)
Discontinuity (an animation system for POV-Ray)

[edited by - clum on June 9, 2004 11:14:44 PM]

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I have a book written by Charles Petzold about Win 32 API, but if you are going to be making games you don''t need to go that deep. It is a great book though. I really loved the nehe tutorials. They are a great place to start. Don''t overlook the Redbook for opengl. It is a valuable resource for learning things that you don''t see in tutorials, or venturing ahead on your own. Look at it here: http://www.dcc.unicamp.br/~lmarcos/courses/mc603/redbook/

The next parts are where this starts getting fun. Start playing with graphics and sound and stuff like that. You''re programming skills will have to expand into areas of GUI programming, networking, threading and lord knows what else, but if you got this far you shouldn''t have any trouble with the rest of it.

There is also the option of using Game Engines, Mod''ing Games and creating Levels and such. These make not be directions you want to go in, but the more you learn about them the more rounded your skill set becomes.

Good luck,
--L2S

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Well I have had previous game dev experience other than programming. I used to work on a couple of teams for level design and modelling. The closest to programming for a mod I''ve come to was with a bunch of guys changing parts of a game''s demo to include other weapons/vehicles and a new map etc. Thanks for your input, I''ll take a look at those sites.

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Another option for getting off the ground quickly these days is to use a .NET langugae and managed DirectX ( C# , VB.NET plus a few others ).

If you know C++ then C# isn''t a major leap.

Who knows , one day it may even be cross platform

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quote:
Original post by Keem
Another option for getting off the ground quickly these days is to use a .NET langugae and managed DirectX ( C# , VB.NET plus a few others ).

If you know C++ then C# isn''t a major leap.

Who knows , one day it may even be cross platform


Unlikely, windoze is stupid like that.

--------------------------------------------------------
Life would be so much easier if we could just get the source code.

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quote:
Original post by Venerable Vampire
quote:
Original post by Keem
Another option for getting off the ground quickly these days is to use a .NET langugae and managed DirectX ( C# , VB.NET plus a few others ).

If you know C++ then C# isn't a major leap.

Who knows , one day it may even be cross platform


Unlikely, windoze is stupid like that.

--------------------------------------------------------
Life would be so much easier if we could just get the source code.


Mono, Dot GNU .Net is available for other platforms (although they haven't implemented everything).

I'd forget about learning win32 programming, it's not really that useful, you'll never need it outside of tool development and if you want to make GUI apps (e.g. tools) use Windows Forms in .Net or for cross platform development an API such as GTK instead of the Win32 API. ]

Take a look at SDL which is a nice API for 2D and can be used to setup OpenGL windows. You can use it start making some simple 2D games, starting from things like pong and breakout going up to more complicated things such as Pac Man or even a full blown 2D RPG.

[edited by - Monder on June 10, 2004 9:49:43 AM]

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Alrighty looks like SDL is the most recommended. I already know C# too though so that''s not something I have to turn to.

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quote:
Original post by RobD122
Alrighty looks like SDL is the most recommended. I already know C# too though so that's not something I have to turn to.


I guess my .NET game programming / graphics library is already usefull enough for a starter - it has already got much of SDL's functionality (works on Linux/Mono too!):

ManagedGL - the cross platform game library - open source

Take a look at the benchmarker included, it is a good ManagedGL tutorial on itself.

[edited by - Sijmen on June 10, 2004 2:23:00 PM]

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