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MMORPGs are so boring

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They really are usually you sit there holding the run button for like 10 mins then you kill some monster that lacks any kind of A.I. Then you go back to the town then repeat. Zzzzzz.

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For one they can make the worlds less void. All the ones I''ve played usually have big empty boring worlds. There''s no real reason to have a vast empty space that serves no purpose than to be a tedious trek.

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Ilike the mmorpg`s the 13-16 yr olds make that are coded in teh visual basic!

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A keyboard macro does wonders for games like that.

If the game wont accept external keyboard inputs, then I usually go for the elastic band and masking tape method.

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quote:
Original post by Code_Dark
quote:
Original post by wannabe 1337
Ilike the mmorpg`s the 13-16 yr olds make that are coded in teh visual basic!


Odd, I never knew any of them were ever completed...


- CD



// Brought to you by Code_Dark
| DShaw Encryption | Righting a wrong- my contribution to the world.



VB MMorpg thats been running for 2 years and is gtting pretty big, Quest :: Free Online RPG

Ive played it on and off for 2 years, it''s pretty decent for a free 2d rpg coded in vb.



Sharp Basic - Coming summer 2004!
Sign Up For Sharp Basic Beta Testing!!!

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I feel that I must mention Progress Quest in this thread... An interesting, free MMORPG with a streamlined interface which I think is coded in Visual Basic...

Did I tell you about the hidden 3d-graphics mode?

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quote:
Original post by Man_with_a_Plan
They really are usually you sit there holding the run button for like 10 mins then you kill some monster that lacks any kind of A.I. Then you go back to the town then repeat. Zzzzzz.



Yeah, this is exactly what keeps me away. Lag and the race of the status bars. Great, can''t wait.



--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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Its the level treadmills that do me in.

God I miss you classic UO... Remove Trammel and Feluccia, and I''ll play you again.

*huggles his UO*

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I never played big house MMORPGs, but they have no justifications to make a boring game. They get a shitload of money, so they should spend at least half of the money for teh game (ie. hire more people, do more quests, events, enlarge the world, etc.).
Smaller MMORPGs, OTOH, don''t have the resources to add new content all the time, so they can get boring. That''s one of the problems we have, and I plan to change it (the first step was embedding a scripting language in our server, to make the quests creation easier).

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I just don''t get the very premise - lets get thousands upon thousands of gamers together into one giant megaworld, have them come on as often as possible and....

(deep breath here)

break off into small teams and go beat up unimpressive AI monsters in gameplay that was old when NetHack was new.

Wow, its like Nethack and IRC rolled into one! omfg that''s incredible!

Yeah, I don''t like MMORPGs. Its not the MMO thats the problem, nor the RPG. I just don''t know who decided that the two things that needed to be merged were dungeon crawlers (which are traditionally for very small groups of players) and massive amounts of players.

Now, MMORTS or MMOFPS, I could try - but I''m too cheap to play those ones.

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quote:
Original post by Raduprv
I never played big house MMORPGs, but they have no justifications to make a boring game. They get a shitload of money, so they should spend at least half of the money for teh game (ie. hire more people, do more quests, events, enlarge the world, etc.).



When I see trends like this I say "why make fille mignon when your customers will eat dog food?"

It''s like the old complaints of poor TV programs-- stop patronizing poor product and it will change!

--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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The only MMORPG I have ever played was runescape. I allways used to think that if I ever played an MMORPG I would become totaly addicted, but instead I ended up getting really bored really fast. It seemed like the most pointless game I had ever played. Then again I have heard it''s a pretty crappy MMORPG.

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quote:
Original post by Man_with_a_Plan
They really are usually you sit there holding the run button for like 10 mins then you kill some monster that lacks any kind of A.I. Then you go back to the town then repeat. Zzzzzz.


I thought that''s what most RPGs were like?

Kidding aside, it sounds like they''re lacking the forward-driving element most offline RPGs seem to have - storyline.

I''ve not played any, though, so I don''t know how much that''s true. I hear at lot from players about their low-level stories, but it''s one of these things where you only get out as much as you want to put in; if you don''t take charge and decide what you want to do yourself, the role you want to take on, then you''re left just standing around asking "What''s next?"

(I''m going to try moving this from the Lounge to the Game Design forum in the hope that it''ll be more productive that way. My apologies if it doesn''t work. )

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I''ve played 2 MMORPGs (Star Wars Galaxies, and City of Heros). I got both because friends had them and begged me to join so we could all play together, and because they did indeed look pretty appealing to me. (my friends also tried to drag me into a 3rd MMORPG, which I resisted)

SWG I loved for a month. I was thrilled to explore all the different areas. However, eventually I became disenchanted when I realized that nothing was really unique. There''s too much really to go into, but very suddenly, everything became bland to me. I quit playing almost immediately after, and never went back.

CoH I just began about a month ago. For 2 weeks I played it almost non-stop. Recently I''ve begun to feel a bit burnt out on it and so I''ve cut back significantly. However, unlike with SWG, I dont feel any desire to actually quit. I still have fun when I do play, I actually *enjoy* the manner of leveling, and there''s a number of stories involved that I''m eager to see how they pan out. As of now though, I''m just taking my time.

Definately though, I prefer the more dynamic, competetive, and skill-based type of gameplay found in online FPS''s. I played Tribes2 for over 3 years straight. (And I''d still be playing it if my new video card would handle it better).

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I definitely agree with the original poster. Like a few others above I''m trying to change that as well.

There are two problems plaging the MMO industry as I see it:
a) real lack of continued content (as was stated above - the more successful they are, the more money they SHOULD have for content, writers, development, but the less they are ACTUALLY spending)

b) lack of innovation in interface.


Lets start with the second and go back to the first in a bit.

Right now with the way MMOs are scripted there are basically only 9 things you can do: kill, protect, collect, trade, deliver, combine, destroy, type text, or pilot a vehicle.

That''s it. Very very limiting. My wife plays a lot of mystery games like Nancy Drew, Uru and the like which arent online games, but have story-driven interfaces that are part of the environment and the game. One of the things that is needed to save MMMOs is more interaction with the actual gameworld via interfaces like computer control panels, bombs to diffuse, levers to switch on and off...i mean you can think of an infinite number of them and they all make the game much more immersive...which is the strength of an MMO. Living in the world.

Now the question of lack of content development. Games are a business and who wants to spend more money when you can deliver sub-par work and make millions? Well as evidenced by this thread those days are coming to an end. Players are expecting more and they need it to be interested.

Our team is taking a kitchen-sink approach. Sure everyone has projects that they say they have high aspirations to complete but indulge me. The only way MMOs are going to survive is to expand the content through interaction with the world and an expanded grouping of genres. MMOs like There and Second Life are taking interesting approaches to content already. Combine FPS with MMO with RPG and even RTS. Throw in vehicle driving. Throw in world building. Throw in crafting. And thats just the start. Make it all meaningful and dynamic.

There will always be a set group of people who like MMOs...but until the worlds get more lifelike and lifelike with a purpose, people will be discouraged to play them.

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quote:
Original post by Vanquish
b) lack of innovation in interface.

Right now with the way MMOs are scripted there are basically only 9 things you can do: kill, protect, collect, trade, deliver, combine, destroy, type text, or pilot a vehicle.

That''s it. Very very limiting. My wife plays a lot of mystery games like Nancy Drew, Uru and the like which arent online games, but have story-driven interfaces that are part of the environment and the game. One of the things that is needed to save MMMOs is more interaction with the actual gameworld via interfaces like computer control panels, bombs to diffuse, levers to switch on and off...i mean you can think of an infinite number of them and they all make the game much more immersive...which is the strength of an MMO. Living in the world.


Interesting that you should mention that. There''s an MMO design that I''m almost constantly almost working on a prototype of, and one of the things I''ve developed in it is a completely minimalist interface. Most of the time, the only GUI you have is a red bar along the top of the screen; all interaction is done through movement keys (forward backward left right jump crouch strafe, and that''s about it) and the two mouse buttons.

To pick up an object, you look at it and left-click. When you''re holding it, you left-click to bashWith/attack/use it, left-click-hold-release to throw it, and right-click to drop it. If it''s an interactive element that you can''t pick up, such as a lever (and oh, yes, there will be levers... great big ones, with knobs on the ends), then left-click will be ''use'' and right-click will be ''alternate use.'' Simple.

Of course, my whole design is pretty atypical of MMO games, so it''s not terribly relevant.

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Funny, I had the same idea for a system (just FPS with mouse) - however for very complex equipment, I was thinking of a gesture based interface.

What about inventory though? People like to keep stuff.

Anyhow, my approach was this: you start out with dick-all. Naked on a plain. There is no stuff - things are made by getting basic objects (bones, rocks, jewels, etc) and using gestures on them (shear a sheep for wool, make rope, get sharp rock and use it to carve bow, make bow, make arrows, etc etc etc.) Eventually magic or AI slaves/labour creatures could be used to automate processes.

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Some old friends and I were discussing this last night in IRC, and we figured that one of the main issues of boredom is no noticable "passage of time" in the game.

That is to say, nothing ever really changes in the environment, it''s always the same. Sure you may have quests to do... but when do they actually affect anyone other than yourself and your party?

Though I only played Asheron''s Call for a few days, these guys are fans of it, so maybe they''re a bit biased, but they said AC *did* seem different because of all the content that they added every month.

Why hasn''t anyone else done an AC-version of a MMOG? But noo.. let''s follow EverCrack''s method. Grr.

-Greven

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I''ve played UO, EQ, DAoC, JumpGate, EVE, and recently, Horizons. My co-workers keep trying to get me into City of Heros, but I''ve noticed they are talking less about the game as time goes on. In fact one even admitted he''s getting bored with the game, as it''s just all combat. Which is my original estimate of the game; Once the new-car smell wore off, you''d be shuttling it back to the lot.

I had more hope for a game like JG or EVE, but their implementations were fairly broken. Considering that all three recent space-sim MMORPGs have basically taken a nose dive, I''m not sure the idea is doable. At least without some sort of radical change in the game mechanics. (And then it might not be much of a space-sim anymore...)

I too get tired of the Progress Quest-like gameplay. That design is intentional. If a game shows you everything in just a week, then there''s no way the publisher can continue to make money from your $12.95/mo subscription. So, to me, I feel like a lot of MMORPGs artifically limit how far and fast you can grow. And no matter how well the game tries to hide that, I still see numbers and progress meters. All there just to keep me enslaved so I will shovel out another month''s worth of money.

Horizons was fun until I reached around level eighteen or so. And then the newness wore off and I saw many, MANY hours of killing mobs until I could level up. The game was even less interesting than DAoC, since like in early UO, you could be a one-man tank in Horizons. At least in DAoC you had to find other people to work with in order to make an effective mob/player hunting team.

I dunno. I don''t think I will ever be that interested in MMORPGs as long as I feel the game is just trying to hang on to my monthly subscription with simple level treadmill gameplay. I think I''ll just stick to small-time multiplayer. I still have fun with Battlefield 1942 or even Team Fortress Classic, and that game is ancient.

---
- 2D/Pixel Artist - 3D Artist - Game Programmer - Ulfr Fenris
[[ Gaping Wolf Software ]] [[ GameGenesis Forums ]]

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I find them boring, too.

I also agree with Evil_Greven.

The interface and monster ai isn''t what makes them boring, to me.
It''s the lack of progression.

What these games need are the forces of good and evil battling
for control. How about hiring some full-time writers to lead
both sides?

Not everyone wants to play the knight, and that should be a
limited position anyways. You should be able to take a place at
the King''s court and conspire to overthrow it for the other
King. If a town is attacked by ogres, you shouldn''t be able to
spawn there. The ogres should attack NPCs, PCs, destroy
villages and just try to take the town over. They should have
the ability to succeed.

-Hyatus
"da da da"

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