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Paul Cunningham

XP or XP's

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One thing that i havn''t seen done in RPG''s is to have more than one type of Experience Point. Is there a reason for this? I was thinking of a system were the player gets skills to start the game with. Each skill improves by collecting experience points which are automatically put into the appropriate skill. When the skill maxes out it creates a fork of new skills to excel in. The player can select from this point which new skills that they want to work on next. Example: 1st skill would be Melee fighting; 2nd skills would be bludgeoning, piercing, slashing weapons 3rd skill would be a weapon specific skill. After this the player can go back to the first skills and go for projectile or go back to Melee fighting and work on a new 2nd skill. Another XP system was to have to different types of XP 1. Academic and 2. Practical. You would get Experience points in these separate categories for doing differnent tasks. As you go up level in one XP category it wouldn''t be called level 1 practical, instead it would be something like -Level 1 practical is called harmless and Level 20 practical is dangerous - Level 1 academic would be called dumbass and Level 20 academic is called genious -. This way a play doesn''t think of their character a level 1, 2 or 3 etc instead they have something a bit more descriptive like "I''m a Dangerous Dumbass" or "I''m a Harmless Know-it-all". Skill''s would be seperated into these two XP categories so when a character goes up a level in (lets say) practical then there would be "X" amount of skills in this category that they can place skill points into. I can see a lot of potential in having more than one XP counter in a game. I was just wondering why it hasn''t been done or maybe it has?! I love Game Design and it loves me back. Our Goal is "Fun"!

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I like the idea of separating the theoretical and practical aspects of a skill. The thing is that I am not sure this is needed. I mean, for instance in the P&P RPG I used to play, you would have a theory of combat skill and the related skills that are learnt through practice (Weapon skills, Dodging, Parrying, etc).
As well, you have a Theory of Magic skill, and each spell is a skill on its own.

I loved the system used in Stormbringer RPG, where each time you would do a critical using a skill, you would gain a mark in this skill. Then at regular intervals (end of scenario, generally), you would roll the dice to know if you could increase in those skills where you got marks (one roll per mark). The higher your level in the skill, the more difficult the increase (to take a sort of learning curve in account). On the other hand, you could simply increase your level through XP, in which case there was no difference made by the current level you were at, but the increase would be smaller.
So far, I don''t think there has been a really interesting way to show the difference between theory and practice...
Maybe those ideas would be a good start ?

youpla :-P

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quote:
Original post by ahw
, you would have a theory of combat skill and the related skills that are learnt through practice (Weapon skills, Dodging, Parrying, etc).

Practice as in? When you fight your fighting skill is automatically increase slowly? When you fight with a halberd your halberd skill increases slowly?

I guess this does have it''s benifits over the first system i mentioned if the player was controlling a human. As the system that i mentioned probably made skill improvement a little "too" manual. Hmmm, thanks





I love Game Design and it loves me back.

Our Goal is "Fun"!

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I''m going to re-mention an experimental system that came up somewhere in the really early days of "what''s with stats?".

It separates "skill" into three areas:
- ability: your natural, bodily aptitude. Things like Strength and Dexterity in ADnD...
- knowledge: your theoretical mastery of a subject.
- skill: your practical mastery of a subject.

Abilities are pretty unchangeable - barring certain special effects and a LOT of training.
Knowledge can be trained quite well, through self-study ( very slow ) or through being taught ( much faster ).
Skill can be practiced by yourself or with teaching. Total skill level is bounded by your knowledge in a subject - no matter how much you practice, if you don''t know everything, you won''t be able to do everything.



Give me one more medicated peaceful moment.
~ (V)^|) |<é!t|-| ~
ERROR: Your beta-version of Life1.0 has expired. Please upgrade to the full version. All important social functions will be disabled from now on.

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My game will used a variant of the chaosium system used in stormbringer. As in stormbringer, each time you use a skill you have a chance to increase it. Besides, at the end of the day, you can distribute stress points which are given by the GM. The stress points allow the player to evolve the character the way he wants, whereas the skills improves depending on the way he plays.
Each skill level costs more points than the previous one (I have yet to establish the learning curve).

This way I can choose to reward the player for his roleplay. Anyway, the skills wont evolve very rapidly, because I want the characters to do things using their brains (or the players brains) rather than using their muscles.

There are roots skills, these will evolve together until a certain level, then separatly.

"Between the time when the oceans drank Atlantis and the rise of the sons of Arius there was an age undreamed of..."

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I like the use-increase idea for skills, but what''s to stop a person from repeatedly casting fireball at a wall over and over again then going out into the game world with Grand Master skills? Yes, I suppose this is practice, but shouldn''t you only gain by actually using it in the field?

--------------------
Just waiting for the mothership...

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Well, there is only a slim chance that the skill actually increase, so he would have to practice for a long time. Moreover, the player impersonate a traveller, so staying to long in one place could mean he doesn't want to travel anymore... Sort of game over then. ( Well, perhaps he will be warned of its anti-rolistic ways before)

As it has been previously said magic is a tremendously difficult task but for the simplest of things. In this game, the only fireball you can do is a static spherical zone where air transmutate itself into fire. So much for the fireball. Besides, if he can do that more than ten times a day (practice a lot this one), i would be surprised. To spice the life of a would-be magician, he will probably be killed if someone else discover his magical abilities (great cataclysm due to magic abuse).




Edited by - DungeonMaster on August 28, 2000 3:43:10 PM

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I''ve been working on a similar system. The player must first take part in adventures to gain Adventuring Experience, which is a value assigned to how much that player as accomplished in his/her class. Then, the player takes his/her character to a training room. In said training room, the player exchanges his/her Adventuring Experience Points and works to build up his/her Attribute Experience, which is like regular levels in your average RPG. Then, when the player has enough Attribute Levels, he/she can then exchange levels gained for skills, i.e a given skill, called Guided Blow, requires that the player exchanges three levels to gain said skill. The player can never go below level one, and can only have a given number of skills (to allow for excessive levelling). Said skill is very weak when first acquired, but the player can level up the skill to improve it. Figure into the system that there is also Magic Knowledge experience and Magic Usage experience (for each spell), and you end up with something ungodly complex... which is perfect for micromanagement freaks, but horrible for the rest of us. I''ve got some "dumbing down" to do, yet.

-Jaemes Weare

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Well personnaly, i think that buying your skills is a little too unrealistic. For me you learn new skills by practicing them. To learn to play harp, you play harp. The training is good, if the master is good, and if he can bear his student ;-)

Still training takes times, and the player should feel how boring two weeks of training can be. Moreover, trainers should be rare, unless you place the action in a very cultured world, where learning has been elevated to an art.
The high priest of Mandaar then said :
"One duty above all : the guidance of the youngs, always answer to their question, whatever they may be. No knowledge should be restricted."
Of course using some necromantic lore is forbidden, but not knowing it.

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Well, I wasn''t suggesting that you *buy* the skills - more along the lines that you trade your experience for the skills that a trainer will provide. The experience is only there to prove that you have what it takes to use the skill.

-Jaemes Weare

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