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TITAN

win32 asm article

7 posts in this topic

Your welcome.

If you, or anybody else for that matter, can think of something I neglect to cover, or don't spend enough time on, please let me know.

I want to make this thing as useful and fun as possible. But, I can't do it w/o feedback ( good or bad ).

- Chris

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Hey Chris!

Glad to see you writing Windows ASM programming articles! :-) Well, since you asked for feedback, I would like to merely suggest these:

* Forget about the little things--I am
sure no one who reads this tutorial is
really newbie to ASM...
* Instead, each addition, reader should
should have a "articleN.exe" meaning
you should walk us through to create
an app. Lets say first step is a basic
MessageBox displayed, then a window,
then go on to GDI--just to touch it,
and jump to DDraw. See?
* Stay on your topic, and,
* Take your time, and explain everything.

So far, everything is good, but what I wish you improve for the next article is that you walk us through step-by-step in making that template you did... please walk-us-through next time. :-)

And, don't take any offense, just think of them as suggestions. When I write tutorial, I wish someone will give me feedback! Its hard to get useful feedback, really, and I hope this is useful feedback.

- prauppl

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Thanks for the suggestions.

Actually, next article we are doing just that -- walking through more of it. I won't be touching on GDI though ... way too much other stuff to cover.

I am covering the main game loop, development of a Direct Draw library, and bitmap library in detail next time. I am only grazing over the innerworkings of DirectDraw in ASM though, it gets pretty ugly the further down you delve.

Anyway, that is what is coming and I am trying to break it down as nicely as I can so we can step through each piece.

BTW, my reason for covering the basic instructions wasn't really to teach people anything. But to mainly illustrate how few are actually used in Win32 ASM programming.

- Chris

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Sounds cool then! :-) Oh yeah, I never understood the basic function declaration in ASM... :-)

All I know is that when I used NASM, the parameter list starts from [ebp+4]... doh! I am not even sure of that! ;-)

Thanks btw! :-) Maybe you can show us how to make ASM easy...

- prauppl

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Yes, you are correct about the parameter list ... but we won't be covering it.

We are going to use some special High Level pseudo-ops to make our lives extremely easy. So we can focus on learning how to write bitchin' games, instead of me giving a basic assembly primer for the seven articles.

After this next article, all primer material will be finished and we will be focusing stricly on game programming concepts. In fact, the primer is complete about halfway through this next article ... and then we get into the code!

- Chris

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Could you possibly throw in a refrence to what different registers do. I've never done asm before you article, and I am interested in learning more, but i haven't seen a refrence for all the registers.
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For Win32 purposes they are all general purpose. We do not deal with segments since we are in flat memory model, and as I mentioned above we won't be directly using the stack frame register EBP.

As I go through the series, if a place comes up where a certain register is used a certain way I will cover it. But, in general, a register reference is unnecessary for Win32.

- Chris

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thank you so much sounds like this will help quite a bit cant wait for the next part!!!!
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