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TITAN

any good x86 assembly programming books?

19 posts in this topic

If you want to learn for DOS then I recommend:

The Revolutionary Guide to Assembly Language and Master Class Assembly Language.Both are by Wrox Press and are damn fine works with plenty of great examples.

As far as Windows in assembly there is only one book currently out there ... Windows Assembly Language and Systems Programming by Barry Kauler. Unfortunately this is meant for Windows 3.1 not 9.X\NT platforms.

I am currently working on an outline for a Win32 ASM book. But, as of right now, the only resources are on the internet.

- Chris

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thanks for the help i only program in dos so far using djgpp i am pretty much a beginner i would like to start programming for windows but i think i should practice more in dos i found something http://webster.cs.ucr.edu/
seems helpful so far and its free so....
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Actually,

Writing assembly in Windows is FAR easier than anything in DOS. 80% of what you do is make calls to the API.

In DOS you have to worry about segments, and other headache causing stuff. In Windows the memory model is FLAT so you don't have those worries.

Anyway, just some thoughts. Unlike C, ASM sucks to learn on DOS and I have seen many people get discouraged by it, or start thinking that ASM is difficult. There is no valid reason for learning DOS ASM anymore now that DOS is dead. If you plan on using ASM for anything at all in the future I would suggest just learnign Win32 ASM.

Good Luck.

- Chris

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yeah ill try win32 ASM but im not a master at c right now what things do you have to worry about when writing windows programs anything i should know before trying it out
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Head over to this web site. It has numerous tutorials that you can check out.

Http://win32asm.ownz.com

I also have a series of articles for GamDev in the works, which are on game programming in Win32 ASM. They may be of use to you once they come out.

In the meantime check out the site and take a peek at how easy it is.

- Chris

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thanks a lot cant wait for your articles
that site is pretty good i downloaded masm32 and tried it out still learning how to use it right now but it looks nice again....thanks for all the help everyone
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what??? i am totally confused checking those tuts was my first look at windows programming you have to do so much extra stuff anyways bit do you have a web page?
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Yes ... I have a web site:

Http://www.fastsoftware.com

However ... when I changed over my web site I took down a few things. There is plenty of code up, but nothing for the true beginner.

It may seem like there is A LOT more stuff that you have to do, but in reality there isn't.

A basic template is provided in the masm32 package and you can build off of those examples.

Just take the time to read through Iczelion's tutorials and everything will fall into place. Start at WinMain in the examples and follow the code to see how it works. It is almost like a C program.

If you go to my site download the applications ZIP file and take a peek at my code. It is better commented and should be able to help you out if your run into any problems.

- Chris

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Inner Loops
by Rick Booth
ISBN: 0-201-47960-5

Pentium Processor Optimization Tools
by Michael L. Schmit
ISBN: 0-12-627230-1

------------------
DavidRM
Samu Games
http://www.samugames.com

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ok im starting to understand how a windows program operates
but now i need more info on assembly a commented example creating a few variables and then setting up a loop subtracting or adding to those and displaying their current value in the window would be very helpful
its strange learning assembly AND windows programming at the same time
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Creating a variable is just like in DOS ASM except for when you need to create a Windows Specific Type of variable.

myVar1 dd 0 ; Creates a DWORD ( 4 BYTES ) with a vlaue of Zero == INT in C.

myVar2 RECT <> ; Creates a RECT struct. NOTE: There are no value in the parenthesis

myVar3 RECT <20,20,100,100> ; Creates a RECT with X,Y COORDS at 20,20 and 100 x 100 in size.

That is all you need to do to create a variable.

Loops are extremely easy using MASM's High level syntax.

mov eax, 0
.while eax < 10
inc eax
mov ebx, 2
add eax, ebx
.endw

I will be covering all of this in much greater detail in my article series. The first one should be up sometime next week.

It will take a few issues to get completely through all of the basics and such.

- Chris

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i never learned dos ASM but that helped some variables had me confused i could see stuff like buffer1[128]:BYTE which looks like a nice array of bytes altho when i try that i get errors ???
and then i see stuff like your examples
varname dd value
i dont think i need anymore help for a while ill mess with it until i can get it to do something thanks to all who gave me lists of books
and to bit for so much more
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Want a good asm book?

Graphics Programming Black Book.
Micheal Abrash.

asm and a whole lot more.

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well i just got the win32 api ref very helpful now maybe i can do a little better wont help me with ASM but itll sure help with the windows part so far ive changed the look of my window a little but its early in the morning and i must get some sleep so i cant play too much

------------------
TITAN
titan_ct@hotmail.com

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"Assembly step by step" by duntemann is a good book if your starting from scratch and it's funny to boot.
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i thought this topic had died
but then i get back from running from floyd
and theres a reply......anyways
thanks i havent had a chance to buy any books i went back to learning some more
dos c/c++ windows scares me

------------------
TITAN
titan_ct@hotmail.com

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