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Opticon

A Synth Question...

4 posts in this topic

This area of the message board doesn't see much action, so here goes... I don't want to sound like a total idiot, but terms like "synthesizer" and "keyboard" are a little loose and are causing me a little confusion. I have a Yamaha PSR-225 which is a basic, simple midi keyboard. It has a bunch of pre-sampled voices and doesn't really do much except add some effects. What I want to look into getting is a synth... but what kind? I know there are those strange sounding contraptions that wail at the movement of your hands... the real old things. I've even heard the keyboard I have be referred to as a synthesizer. What I am looking for is a Keyboard that allows for the creation of your own strange sounding voices by setting tone, echo, digitizing, etc... So basically I am not sure which types of synths I should be looking at. Can anyone help me??? P.S. I am talking hardware here... I know there are some great soft synths out there, and can find them easily... need the hardware version for later... Edited by - Opticon on 9/6/00 10:39:39 PM
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Well Opticon..

That's a very general question. How about some more detail?
Like:
- What kind of music are you planning to make?
- Do you want built in sequencing and/or effects?
- What's your price range?



zero
static music




Edited by - LJG on September 7, 2000 1:50:04 AM
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You''re right, that was a little more general than I hoped it to be... I''ll narrow it down a little, LJG... what type of synths do you use? What do they do? How do they work?
I''m planning to make all types of music from Pink Floyd-ish sounding stuff to atmospheric music...
Built in sequencing might be helpful, and effects definitely. I am just looking for more than a simple pre set panel voice with some added effects. I am interested in building an original sounding voice, and change the oscillation over time... pulse sounds and drawn out pitch bends... spacey sounding stuff (Think Pink Floyd - On the Run, Welcome to the Machine, Cluster One).
Price range is not much of an issue now... once I know what I am looking for, I can look around for something I can afford.

Sorry if I am being too general again. If I knew more of what I am talking about...
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I myself use some old Korg and Roland stuff,but do most of my work with a combination of the keyboards and the computer.

I really like the Korg Triton. Great synthesis section,nice sequencer,effects,and sampling. I have a rack version on order now ( no one can seem to keep them in stock )

It really is a matter of taste. My best suggestion is to go to music stores and play around with what they have. It''s the only way to really hear the boards in action.

Also, you can go to the major keyboard maker''s sites and check out what they have. Roland,Korg,Yamaha,etc.



zero
static music


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Thanks, that is very good advice... Now all I gotta do is find a music store around here that has a synth or two on the floor. The place down from me had a Korg Digital Piano for $800 and it had like 6 voices. That was pretty much the extent of it''s capabilities... Thanks a lot, LJG!

BTW, I downloaded all your music... It''s great!
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