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Guest Anonymous Poster

Where does one start in all of this?

10 posts in this topic

I think its best to start building up a game idea. Something that other game developers hasnt donne yet. But also have all the existing ideas with your idea. When you have reach to a nearly donne idea I think you should search for a crew. Then I mean the team you would work with. Then its almost a must to have knowledge about something in the game indostry. You could for example be a good drwer or just know the history of game dovelopmet. You could also have knowledge about something you realy need to make a game like to be a 3d artist or a programmer. Then Its just up to your team and your self were to star. For example Programming your own game engine or stell someones other!

Try starting there It should probably ork. It works for many. But if your realy going into the game indosry you should start learning programming and seek job at any bigger company and build up your karier there!

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That will work if you just want to be a designer. If you plan to program though, you'll wan't to learn a language like C++ and then write a simple game (a text adventure or tetris clone).

--TheGoop

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What he said just now is fully corect if you start programming you should first learn how to do a simple game as a tetris clone. To start programming is easy. You first bye ( If you pick the option to learn the language of c++) a book about that language you pick. There is many languages. Try to read texts what your languge is about. Find tutorials that suits your kind of programming. But first by a book. WWW.gamedev.net should have links to pages were to read about these books. When you find a book that suits you then go to your local book story. They should have it. If you live on the country or the book store dont have it you could get it via internet and pick the book up from your local post office after ordering it. Simplier then that it cant get!!!!
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Buy "Windows Game Programming for Dummies" by Andre LaMothe.

You cannot get a better starting point for game programming. You need to know some C, though.

If you dont know any C, then get "The C Programming Language" by Kernighan and Ritchie.

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i am reading a book now called pratical C++, im about half way through it and am picking up the basics of the language... where would i find a copy of Game programming for dummies? Im assuming its made by the same people who make the rest of those bright yellow dummies books right?
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1) Learn C/C++
2) Learn some graphics API (DX, OpenGL)
3) Create some small games

While doing this, you should read any article and any post you can find, it will help you much. Game development is the hardest job in the industry and this not without reason. Starting is easy, but finishing them is really hard. So better begin with something small and get more experience, after that, create a bigger game, ...

Most of the games by young guys will never get finished, because they want to create Starcraft 2 without having ever developed a small game. There's a nice interview with Andre LaMothe on www.perplexed.com/GPMega/ where he's saying something about this point.

CU

------------------
Skullpture Entertainment
#40842461

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Im only 16 years old, and I dont want to do some big games, yet. Because I have realised that it would take TO long and require TO many persons. At the moment Im learning DirectX and also doing a "test game", a snowmobile game, just to do the things I learn, when I'm ready wit that I will try to do a new game, a little more advanced. I plan to start it around next summer. Reason: I'm spending to much time on school (wich is'nt a bad thing =), so I never get the time to programm except on holidays and weekends =)

------------------
Martin Björklund

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Jordan,
Practical C++ is a really great book for some in-depth analysis of C++, including what kinds of pitfalls the language has. I do have one suggestion: DON'T LEARN TO CODE LIKE THAT GUY!
The author has really HORRIBLE variable names that make his code difficult to understand.

A few quick examples:
(on p. 139)
void summfunct {
LETHAL omigosh(cout);
... ...
if(... ...) // GREAT BIG OMIGOSH
omigosh.s() << ... ...;
}

another example, on p.74:

class alpha {
public:
alpha beta(alpha numeric);
const alpha *gamma(const alpha&) const;
void delta(int);
int theta(const);
private:
int sigma;
char * tau;
aleph null;
eta pi;
alpha *omega;
};
alpha particle;

I could go on and on page after page, but
as you can see, this stuff is hardly comprehensible.
Seems like this guy needs to go read some of Steve McConnell's books, such as Code Complete.
Whatever you do, just don't adopt his style.

-Justin Hust

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Hello.
Where does one start in this whole process of game design/development? And once you start whats the logical order to move in,
any help would be appreciated


Thanks

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